Friday, January 22, 2021

Ada Lum, Forgotten Burlesque and Vaudeville Entertainer

Ada Lum was a burlesque and vaudeville performer. According to the New Orleans, Louisiana Birth Record, at Ancestry.com, she was born Ada May Chuck on August 19, 1892. Her parents were Chuck Lum and May deBoer who married on July 30, 1890 in New Orleans.

Ada’s father gave his name as “Lum Chuck” to the city directory company and census enumerator who thought his surname was Chuck. The 1894 New Orleans, Louisiana, city directory listed “Lum Chuck”, a dry shrimp seller, at 99 1/2 Bourbon Street. His next listing was in the 1899 directory and his residence was on Tulane Avenue. His address in the 1900 directory and U.S. Federal Census was 613 Conti Street. The census said Ada’s father was born in China and her mother, of German parents, in Louisiana. Her father’s final appearance in the directory was 1901.

Ada’s talent was reported across the country in 1910. Possibly the earliest account was in the January 4 edition of the Evansville Press in Indiana. The same story and photograph were published in many newspapers.

Beautiful Chinese-American Girl Tackles Sing-Hop Life
Miss Ada Lum, 19, who is singing and joking in vaudeville theaters in the south and middle west, is said to be the only Chinese-American on the stage.

Her father was Dr. Cago Lum, of New Orleans, Chinese physician and president of a large shrimp packing company. But before he died his fortune dwindled by unfortunate investments.

So Mrs. Lum, his white widow, is teaching school, and her daughter is behind the footlights.

There were at least five articles about Ada. The Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), September 4, 1914 said

Few of the patrons realized that Miss Ada Lum enjoys the distinction of being the only Chinese American girl on the American stage today and has a very bright future in store professionally. In an interview she related how she first entered upon her professional career, and gave a short account of her own and her parents’ remarkable life story.

A young Chinese of noble blood came to this country a number of years ago to enter the University of California. Chi Woo Lum had letters of introduction to some of the best families on the Pacific coast and was received in their homes as an equal. Under these conditions he met and fell in love with Miss Lum’s mother, then a budding young debutante. They eloped and were married in Chicago, he entering upon a career of importing merchant at which he was successful. Miss Lum was the issue of this violent love affair, which stirred the entire country, and after an education in a convent had aspirations for a theatrical career, leaving home to join James T. Powers’ company as a show girl with a small speaking part. She afterward joined the Lyric Theatre Stock in New Orleans, which gave her a bast [sic] amount of experience preparing here for her present engagement under the management of Jacobs & Jermon, for leading business, at which her success was instantaneous.

The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), December 29, 1915 said

The Ambitious Performer
By Charles Henderson
There is a little joke connected with the Charming Widows show at the Empire theater this week, a show, by the way, that Phil Isaac, manager of the house and a Cleveland man, cherishes as his own. Isaac is naturally very proud of his burlesque show, and it occurred to the writer to ascertain what some of the members of the company thought about it.

Ada Lum is the prima donna of the troupe. Why shouldn’t a burlesque shoe enjoy the luxury of prima donnas? This one does. The show also has a chorus—this is explained for the benefit of you who have never seen a burlesque show. Those of you who have will regard my recitative as superfluous and tedious. However, Alma McClean, is a member of the chorus, a chum of the prima donna and extraordinarily pretty. So, we arranged a consultation with Ada Lum and her chorus firmed, Alma, yesterday. The combination is, really, an almost perfect burlesque one, save for the principal comedian, who was absent.

What do you suppose those two girls disclosed, which is what I meant above when I mentioned a joke on the Charming Widows? They aren’t widows at all, but would very willingly take the first step in that direction, namely, marriage, and they made no bones about it, either. Ada Lum was inclined to scoff at the title of the show, too, because widowhood really has no share of the plot of the piece, and widowhood seem, right now, so far removed from any personal equation that may include her.

Isaac, however, explained away the apparent incongruity by saying that a burlesque show is a burlesque show, and the name means no more than Joe or John or Fanny when attached to an individual.

The Ambitions of Ada.

“It is the show itself,” he said, “just as it is the individual that counts, not the title. I am sorry that we haven’t more widows in the troupe, but it can’t be helped now unless we can hurriedly find somebody to marry our girls and then die or otherwise dispose of themselves.”

“I’m anxious to get married,” was the frank confession of Ada Lum. “I’m tired of the stage, on account of the constant traveling around. Give little Ada a home, and I would be happy. Furthermore, I don’t care who knows it. I will promise to sing only at my own piano—and please marry me to a man who will provide one—and burlesque will know me no more. And I don’t want to be a widow, either, I want this marriage thing to last.”

Ada Lum also announced that she was a good cook, can sew and make her own clothes and when it is related that she is pretty, you may regard her matrimonial status as clearly outlined as her own frank admission of her ambition. …

Ada Lum, a tall, statuesque beauty, is a New Orleans product. In her nationality she is a peculiar combination, too. her father was a Chinese and her mother a German. She is decidedly proud of her lineage, too, and sees not a thing odd in it. …

The Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 31, 1918 said

Burlesque Queen Has Much to Do
Ada Lum Bosses the Chorus and Wins a Popularity Contest.
Popularity contests, especially as conducted by newspapers, are not usually conclusive in the popular mind. This week, tough, Cleveland entertains a Cleveland girl who was the winner—or, shall we say, the heroine—of such a contest, and none are likely to resent her victory. The girls is Ada Lum, and she’s a sure-enough burlesque queen.
Her victory in the popularity contest last winter was over every other woman of the stage in America, and this week she’s driving about Cleveland in the seven passenger, six-cylinder car which a New York paper awarded as the prize.

Miss Lum is featured with “The Avenue Girls” at the Star this week, but she’s more than a featured performer. She is putting on all the ensemble numbers, arranging the dances and the like, and she gets a lot of fun out of it.

“I’ve been dancing and singing on two burlesque wheels for eight years,” says Miss Lum, “and when I tackled this job I found I has a lot of steps and kicks in the back of my head. Now all I have to do is tell the orchestra leader to play, and stand around and persuade the girls to perform thus and so.

“Many of them, of course, have has burlesque chorus experience. They nay not know the particular combinations of steps which seem to me to be this song or that one, but they do know something of ensemble dancing. If i can show them how one step fits with another, when to kick and when to wiggle, and make them work for me, I’m all right. If I can’t I just don’t pit on ensemble dancing numbers.

“This is a hastily made show, for a short booking, and, of course, we don’t pretend that the chorus is as well trained as it would be after a season’s work. But the girls do have some idea of their steps, and they haven’t had time, yet, to get slovenly. We’re rehearsing all the time, too, which counts. Ordinarily, in the regular season, a burlesque troupe lacks opportunity for every day rehearsals, and people get careless. it is so easy to improvise anyway.”

Improvising, for that matter, is the bane of the burlesque magnate. Burlesque performers, like those in any other kind of music show where comedy counts, have the knack of getting their own laughs in their own ways, and they aren’t at all careful to follow the book. Presently there is trouble, and, if their contracts fail to hold, there is danger that when they quit they take the laughs and the good hoakum [sic] with them.

“The Avenue Girls” is a short run show, with engagements only in Cleveland, Toledo and Detroit, but it’s a good show for that reason. Its principals are a capable lot, and they are using their own stuff. Very often it is new to those with whom they work, and the result is a genuine spontaneity which is lacking in most machine-made shows.

Miss Lum is one of those burlesque favorites who, it is reasonable to expect, won’t always be a burlesquer. Her presence, and her real abilities as a comedienne, a singer and a dancer, would seem to fit her for any kind of music show or revue. She has burlesque contracts ahead for some seasons, but contracts do not always hold.

Like as not she’ll be back, one of these days, as a Broadway favorite. She’ll be welcome in her home town anyway.

The Binghamton Press (New York), December 30, 1918 said

Burlesque Star Is Unusual Type
Ada Lunn [sic], Prime Donna in Beauty Revue, Is Daughter of Chinese Physician

Theater-goers who remark frequently about the appealing beauty of Ada Lum, prima donna with Rube Bernstein’s beauty Revue, playing at the Armory Theater tonight and Tuesday, may be surprised to learn that she is a composite of oriental and occidental parentage, being the daughter of an American mother and a Chinese father.

Ada Lum’s mother, herself said to be a woman of unusual beauty of the southern type, lived in New Orleans, La., where she met and fell in love with Dr. Sing Yet Lum, a Chinese physician and a highly educated man, who was practicing in that city. They were married and went to the doctor’s former home in Shanghai, China, on their honeymoon, remaining there for two years, and it was in the ancient city that Ada Lum was born.

As a baby, she looked like a normal Chinese infant, but as she grew to womanhood she assumed largely her mother’s type of beauty, retaining, however, the slightly slanted eyes and the tiny feet of the high caste Chinese women.

She displayed a fondness for music early in childhood, inheriting this trait from her mother, who was both a singer, and a splendid pianist, and she was looked upon in New Orleans as a child prodigy. She was educated in a New Orleans convent and was never permitted to appear in public until she was almost out of her teens, shortly afterward she was announced as a “discovery” by the famous French Opera Company of New Orleans and became a full-fledged prima donna.

It was there that Rube Bernstein, himself a French Canadian, first heard of Ada Lum sing, and he was so taken with her voice and unusual beauty that he offered her a salary she could not well refuse and obtained her signature to a contract for a term of years. This same Ada Lum is today said to be the highest salaried prima donna in burlesque and, in the words of her manager, “well worth it.”

Billboard, May 10, 1924, said

Chinese-American Prima Donna Who Shares Honors With Comics
Ada Lum was here in New Orleans and as a child impressed her parents with her vocalistic talents sufficiently to warrant them in providing special tuition along these lines until she became noted in amateur circles as an accomplished vocal and musical instrumentalist specializing on the piano.

Her stage debut was under the auspices of the Sacred Heart Academy while a student there, and this led up to a professional career that had its beginning with the J. T. Powers Musical Comedy Stock Company and similar companies in and around her native city.

Seeking broader fields that would bring her to the attention of managers in the larger cities of the North, Ada sought for and obtained an engagement with Jacobs & Jermon in the “Gus Fay Show” and remained under their management for four seasons. Later she transferred her activities to Detroit under the Sam levy management at the Cadillac Theater in burlesque stock and from there to the I. H. Herk shows on the American Circuit, and more recently to the Columbia Circuit, where she is garnering fresh laurels as a prima donna, likewise a comedienne in a big scene with Will H. Fox and Harry Koler in Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun”, which was reviewed in detail in April 26 issue.

In 1914 another singing career was launched by American born Chinese Josephine Moy also known as Lady Tsen Mei. She performed in vaudeville and appeared in a few silent and talking pictures. Perhaps Lady Tsen Mei was inspired, to some degree, by Ada.

The Michigan Marriage Record, at Ancestry.com, said Ada married Frank J. Noonan in Detroit on August 7, 1916. Noonan was thirty-three years old and a manufacturer. She was a Philadelphia resident and Noonan of Cadiz, Ohio.

New York Clipper, February 21, 1917 said

Ada Lum, prima donna of the “Charming Widows,” has just announced that she was married August 7, 1916, to Frank J. Noonan of Cleveland, O. They will spend a belated honeymoon in San Francisco and Hawaii at the end of Miss Lum’s season.

At some point they settled in Cleveland, Ohio. In the 1917 city directory Noonan was listed as a salesman at 7011 Fullerton Avenue. He did not appear in the 1918 directory. On June 14, 1918 Ada filed for divorce, in Michigan, due to non-support and desertion. The divorce was granted February 6, 1919. They had no children. The New York Clipper, March 5, 1919 said “Ada Lum, prima donna of the “Beauty Revue,” was granted a divorce from Frank Noonan in Detroit last week by Judge Mulheiser.”

Ada was still performing in 1929. At some point she retired from the stage. In the 1940 census “Ada M. Noble” was married to Bruce Noble, who was thirteen years older. Living with them was Ada’s mother, “May E. Lum”, age 67, whose birth year was essentially the same as “May Chuck” in the 1900 census. An obituary for either parent has not been found. What became of Ada Lum is a mystery.

Below is a selection of newspaper and magazine articles, photographs and advertisements from 1910 to 1929.

Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), June 30, 1919

Beautiful Chinese-American Girl Tackles Sing-Hop Life
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 1, 1910
Beautiful Chinese-American Answers Call of Footlights
Spokane Press (Washington), July 6, 1910
Beautiful Chinese-American Girl Tackles Sing-Hop Life
Tacoma Times (Washington), July 6, 1910
Beautiful Chinese-American Girl Tackles Sing-Hop Life
Seattle Star (Washington), July 7, 1910
Beautiful Chinese-American Girl Tackles Sing-Hop Life
New Orleans Item, October 16, 1910

Lively Comedy Is the New Bill at Victor Theatre
The Victor Theater, starting with Sunday’s matinee, will offer another good farce comedy in “The Doctor’s Assistant,” which is scheduled to run forty-five minutes. Included in the performance are a number of good songs and dances by pretty girls.

The Victor boasts of having the only Chinese American soubrette in the South. She is Miss Ada Lum and her singing and her beauty have attracted much attention.

The Victor recently passed into the hands of Mr. Judah B. levy, who operated the popular Canal street show house very successfully last season.

New Orleans Item, May 18, 1911

New Majestic.
Large audiences this week have proved that the programme arranged by the management has pleased its patrons. May Collins, billed as “The Dutch Girl,” Terre and Hyams, are singers and dancers; Annie Adams, Ada Lum, Britt Wood and Thornton and Wagner, and motion pictures complete the programme. …
Variety, May 20, 1911
New Orleans
Majestic (L. E. Sawyer, mgr.)—After a run of nearly two years, the Tyson Extravaganza Co. gives way to vaudeville. The initial bill contains Thornton and Wagner, Ben Clark, Louise Morel, Ada Lum, May Collins and Terry and Hyams. 

New Orleans Item, May 22, 1911

New Majestic Theater.
The New Majestic theater, at Burgundy street and Elysian Fields avenue, was crowded Sunday afternoon and night and the audiences were greatly pleased.

The headline act, the Three Musical Coattas, offer an interesting number. Their repertoire extends from ragtime to grand opera.

Carroll and Carroll, “The Hebrew and the Soubrette,” are funmakers of merit. In addition to being clever dancers nd singers they have new jokes. Bobby Byrd, Carl Lang and Ada Lum are also on the bill.

The motion views were up to the standard of this theater. The films shown swede interesting and instructive. 

New Orleans Item, May 24, 1911

New Majestic.
Five meritorious acts and motion pictures worth while seeing make the bill at the New majestic theater this week worthy of special mention. There are few better musicians than the “Three Musical Coattas.” Ada Lum, the popular singer, Bobby Byrd, in a novelty act; Carl lang, a capable singer; Carroll and Carroll, “the Soubrette and the Hebrew,” and motion picture are on the bill. 

Variety, May 27, 1911

New Orleans
Majestic (L. E. Sawyer, mgr.; agent, Charles Hodkins; rehearsal Sunday 100.—Musical Coattas; Carroll & Carroll; Ada Lum; Bobby Byrd & Carl Yang. Week, Brit Wood, entertaining; Ada Lum, magnetic; Terry Hyams, hearty appreciation; May Collins, applause; Mr. Thornton, of Thornton & Wagner, is an excellent pianist.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), June 30, 1912

Vaudeville Gives Bright Promises
Gayety.
… Ada Lum, who has a good voice … 

New York Clipper, July 6, 1912

Philadelphia
Gayety (John P. Eckhardt, mgr.)—The Summer season of burlesque continues week of July 1. The Langsford-Flynn fight pictures are an added attraction. the show provided last week was full of ginger, and the patrons were entirely satisfied with the offerings. Joe Rose and Sam Michaels are Yiddish comedians of high order, and they kept the fun going at full tilt in the burlesques. Edna Hill, Friendly and Gordon, and Ada Lum were the interesting numbers in the olio.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 7, 1912

Gayety—That merry aggregation, “The Girls from Havana,” will hold the boards at the Gayetty this week. There are thirty-five of the maidens, and two snappy and humorous burlesques have been provided, during which many tuneful musical numbers will be rendered. Ada Lum’s Living Art Models will be another live wire feature to the show. …

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 9, 1912

Gayety Has Havana Girls
Pretty and lively, and offering a tonic antidote for the warmth of the day, the Girls From Havana came into their own at the Gayety Theater yesterday. The aggregation possesses many amiable comedians and not a few sprightly leading women. A delectable feature of the show was Ada Lum, who with her Living Art Models provided an aesthetic treat equal to any the popular house has offered. … 

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 14, 1912

Gayety—An organization of pretty girls, known as “The Quaker Belles,” will furnish amusement for the week at the Gayety Theatre. Alice Wilson, that dainty little blind, with the sweet voice, figure and winning smile, will chirp songs. Ada Lum will be one of the trump cards in the lot. She will please with her repertory of new songs.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 16, 1912

Quaker Belles at the Gayety
Trim and refreshing in their presentment of merry songs and well turned jests, the Quaker Girls scored heavily with an enthusiastic July audience yesterday afternoon at the Gayety. Prime favorites proved to be Ada Lum, who presented her Living Art Models in reproductions from the old masters …

New York Clipper, July 20, 1912

Philadelphia
Gayety (John P Eckhardt, mgr.)—The Summer season of burlesque is a real care dispeller in these dog days. The best last week had no terrors for the patrons, as they were furnished with a decidedly lively show, furnished by Sam Michaels, James Van Leer and Harry Lester, Butler and Le Mar, Alice Wilson and Ada Lum’s Art Studies were the best liked numbers in the vaudeville portion of the show.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 21, 1912

Gayety—A rare treat is in store for Gayety patrons this week, as “The Monte Carlo Girls,” a bevy of sprightly maidens, will arrive. Two breezy burlesques and an olio of six acts will constitute the bill, while among the favorites are Alice Wilson, a gingery comedienne; Ada Lum, noted for her smile …

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 23, 1912

Monte Carlo Girls at Gayety
Sprightly and chic, “the Monte Carlo Girls” appeared in a well-fashioned burlesque at the Gayety Theatre yesterday. The olio of six acts was brisk and lively, and the costuming was elaborate throughout. Ada Lum, a favorite variety queen, won much applause …

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 28, 1912

Gayety—There will be gay times during the week of July 29 at the Gayety Theatre, when “The Moonlight Maids” furnish the fun in a bill of jest and song, burlesque and vaudeville acts. … The program will consist of two burlesques, in which beautiful show girls and “ponies” will have their fling in song and dances. … Ada Lum has one of the principal roles and will also be seen with her fifteen Living Art models. 

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), July 30, 1912

“Moonlight Maids” Hit at Gayety
“The Moonlight Maids” are responsible for a feast of song and merry jest in their burlesque production which appears at the Gayety this week. The program is divided into two parts and everyone has a chance to show what he or she can do. Mickey Markwood and Chic Cameron ably share the efforts of the fun-making. Ada Lum also handles one of the leading roles in addition to appearing with her fifteen living art models, all of whom are well equipped by nature for this role.

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), October 13, 1912

Gayety—In its improved condition, through the judicious application of paint and decorations, this house will have a double attraction this week with the appearance of John G. Jermon’s will-mown “Gaiety Girls,” which has hitherto won golden opinions from the devotees of high-class burlesque. Previous seasons it had the distinction of being second to none in the burlesque field, yet with all this they claim that they eclipse all previous efforts and gathered within their ranks a coterie of performers never before attained in any on company. in the cast will be found … Ada Lum …

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), October 15, 1912

Gaiety Girls at Gayety
There’s no discussing the quality of the show put up at the Gayety last night by the “Gaiety Girls.” With such a combination of clever entertainers as Gus Fay, Clara Douglas Rackett, the Two Macks, Alice Maude Poole, Ada Lum, Billy Armstrong an John Powers, it goes without saying that there was something doing all the time. Th program was full of ginger and vim from start to finish, with many of the latest musical conceits capably rendered. The chorus was an element of beauty and gracefulness, while the costumes and stage effects lent additional charm to the performance. 

Evening Star (Washington, DC), October 29, 1912

Gayety
The “Gayety Girls,” headed by Gus Fay, Carla Rackett and a corps of well trained singers and dancers, played at the Gayety yesterday and last night before packed houses. The show is full of catchy music, lively dancing and amusing comedy from start to finish. …

Others who are well received are Ada Lum and Alice Maude Poole. 

Cleveland Leader (Ohio), November 7, 1912

Burlesque companies come and go and whatever their merit, they have the usual line of nationalities. But the Gaiety Girls’ organization, which comes to the Empire next week, gets away from this rut. It has a genuine Chinese-American soubrette. Her name is Ada Lum and she is said to be “some” soubrette. Her mother was an American actress and father a Chinese nobleman. At least that is the sworn statement of the press agent. …

Buffalo Evening News (New York), February 5, 1913

It is in the person of a full-blooded Chinese girl as leading soubrette. Miss Ada Lum is the daughter of Li Hun Lum, a noted Chinese physician late of St. Louis.

Boston Herald (Massachusetts), March 11, 1913

Waldron’s Casino
Waldron’s Casino presents this week the Big Gaiety Girls Company, headed by the funny German comedian, Gus Fay. The company began a week’s engagement yesterday and crowded the house at both performances. The entertainment is one of the best given at the Casino this season. The burlesque “One Night in Paris,” abounds in laughable situations, bright dialogue and good music, it is elaborately staged and costumed. Guy Fay appears as Otto Getz, a Chicago sausage maker, who gets into all sorts of scrapes and creates laughter by extricating himself from his dilemmas. He is assisted by handsome and accomplished Clara Douglas Rackett and capable performers as William Armstrong, Lee Hickman, John Olsbain, B. Wilson, Margaret LaVoun, Ada Lum, Blanche Roberts, Ruby Gray, Vergie Cline and a chorus of pretty and vivacious girls.

New York Clipper, March 22, 1913

The Gayety Girls.
(Eastern)
Columbia, New York, March 17.
Irish overtures introduced the Gayety Girls 17, with Gus Fay as the principal comedian. As Otto Getz the sausage maker spent “One Night in Paris,” and had a great time with Millie Fontaine, played by Clara Douglas Rackett. Miss Rackett is full of the burlesque spirit and handled the role nicely, with plenty of dash. Her charming personality was helped along with several showy costumes. Wm. Armstrong was a funny Cook Waffles, constantly in and out of trouble; Lee Hickman played the straight as Lucky Change. John Olsbane was the musical director, and B. Wilson the lookout. Margaret La Voun, Ada Lum, Blanche Roberts appeared to advantage in small roles, and Ruby Gray and Virgie Cline were two lively little all-round helpers in the numbers.

The comedy bits included the business with the beer pitchers, the exchange of the dinners and several money transactions. The numbers were “Drink, Drink, Drink,” “Beautiful Doll,” “Good-Bye,” by Ada Lum …

Newark Evening Star (New Jersey), April 8, 1913

Laughter Holds Full Sway at the Gayety
The Gaiety Girls’ Company, headed by Gus Fay, opened a week’s engagement at the Gayety Theatre yesterday, presenting two one-act travesties entitled “One Night in Paris” and “The Rest Cure,” both of which provoked much laughter and displayed a large aggregation of pretty girls.

The most decided hits of the performance were registered by Miss Ada Lum and the male quartet of “Texas Tommy Dancers” in the second. In both exceptional artistic ability was displayed and the audience’s appreciation was proven by the tremendous applause accorded the participants. …

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), June 8, 1913

Gayety—Burlesque and boxing will constitute the bill at the Gayety Theatre this week. The burlesque features will be introduced by “The Midnight Maidens” company … The company is headed by the well-known functor, Pat Carney, whose rare wit and humor is always a delight and a welcome hand will be extended him. … Miss Ada Lum, Miss Elsie Meadows, Alice Wilson, smiles, songs [sic] and dances. 

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), June 10, 1913

“Midnight Maidens” at Gayety
Two laughable farces which were frequently interrupted by musical numbers by a large chorus led by dainty soubrettes constituted the offering of “The Midnight Maidens” at the Gayety Theatre yesterday. The skits were uproarious and fun was dispensed in large quantities by comedians. Pat Carney was funster-in-chief, and his aides-de-camp were Tom McCracken, a Philadelphian, George A. Wood and Joe Rose. Mae Nelson, Ada Lum, Miss Alice Wilson and Elsie Meadows led the singing and dancing. 

Evening Star (Washington, DC), September 9, 1913

Gayety
A burlesque show first-class in every respect is the offering of Gus Fay and “The Gayety Girls” at the Gayety Theater this week. Besides a two-act burletta there is a well balanced olio in which several specialties are introduced.

Gus Fay handles most of the comedy, and he does it in a manner that keeps his audience in continuous laughter. The plot of Schmidt’s Widows, which is the title of the burletta, deals with the trials and tribulations of one Rudolph Schmidt in his efforts to evade his creditors. Many amusing situations result, and Gus Fay makes the most of them.

Supporting him is Nellie Florede, whose singing is one of the bright spots in the show. Others who assist in making the performance entertaining are Eugene merge, John Rockwell, Bert Woods, Walter Wilson, Ike Wall, Edyth Hamilton, Ada Lum and Ester Carnes. …

Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 9, 1913

Gayety
The attraction this week at the Gayety is Gus Fay and “The Gayety Girls,” presenting a two-act musical burlesque entitled “Schmidt’s Widows.” Two large audiences yesterday gave their stamp of approval to the performance. Gus Fay, a German comedian, has a pleasing role as a ladles’ tailor, and three widows, depicted by Nellie Florede, Ada Lum, and Ester Carnes, aid in carrying out the slender plot of the show. Eugene Jerge, John Rockwell, and Walter Wilson fill in capably.

Edyth Hamilton, as “the shop girl,” is the bright particular star of the performance, her “cat duo” with Fay and the chorus being one of the hits of the show. The olio is furnished by Jerge and Hamilton, in a song and dance number; Ester Carnes and the Misses Nevill, Griffith, and Burnham, in a clever musical number; Rockwell and Woods, comedians, and Nellie Florede, who sang a number of songs. The chorus is large and well trained and attractively costumed.

Omaha Bee (Nebraska), November 23, 1913

This week’s show at the Gayety is John G. Jermon’s “Gayety Girls,” which has always been a welcome visitor here since its initial trip a season or so ago. John G. Jermon is known as a producer of more than usual ability and those shows which have been staged and produced under his personal supervision have usually met with the approval of a satisfied public.

The “Gayety Girls” domes here this season with a brand new book and an all new cast with the exception of Gus Fay, the corn-fed Dutch comic, who is still taking care of the principal comedy role. This season’s vehicle is entitled “Schmidt’s Widows” and is form the pen of George Totten Smith and with lyrics and music by Gus Fay and Adolph Silberman. The cast includes Eugene Jerge, Johnnie Rockwell, Bert Woods, Walter Wilson, Ike Wall, Nellie Florede, Ada Lum, Eduth Hamilton, Ray Williams and Ester Carnes. …

Detroit Times (Michigan), January 3, 1914

Gayety
Gus Fay and Nellie Florede are the two bright stars of the Gayety Girls company which comes to the Gayety theater, Sunday afternoon. …

Ada Lum, the Chinese soubrette, who was here last year with this company, will be remembered as a graceful dancer and charming singer. …

Detroit Times (Michigan), January 5, 1914

Gayety
Gus Fay and the “Gayety Girls” are putting on one of the best burlesque shows seen in Detroit for some time in the Gayety theater this week. The show abounds in good jokes, plenty of fun and good dancing. It is in no sense a one-man production, there being many acts and specialties of merit, although Fay, of course, captures the major share of the applause with his German comedy irk. Nelly Florede is one of the best singers heard in the Gayety this season.

She is ably seconded by Ada Lum and Rae Williams, the other two of three charming widows whose relations with Fay, as Rudolph Schmidt, form the ground work for most of the comedy. … 

Variety, February 13, 1914

Montreal
Gayety (Fred Crowe, mgr.).—“New Gayety Girls” did good business. Jerge & Hamilton and the International Musical Maids did well in the olio. Ada Lum, “the only Chinese girl in Burlesque,” scored in “Oriental Night,” a specialty fixed by Joe Chandler, press agent.

Ada Lum, “the only Chinese girl in burlesque,” had to put up a $500 bond for her trip into Canada, and at first had some difficulty in getting through. She is with Gus Fay’s Gayety Girls.

New York Dramatic Mirror, February 18, 1914

Montreal
Gus Fay, with Gayety Girls at the Gayety scored a hit in Schmidt’s Widows. Ada Lum, a real Chinese maiden, was also a feature.

Boston Herald (Massachusetts), February 22, 1914

Gaiety Theatre
Next week’s attraction at the Gaiety Theatre, headed by the popular German comedian, Gus Fay, will be “Gayety Girls” Company, which will begin a week’s engagement at tomorrow’s matinee Feb. 23. The cast includes Gus Fay, Eugene Jerge, Bert Woods, Walter Wilson, Nelle Florede, Edyth Hamilton, Ray Williams and Ada Lum. The new book is “Schmidt’s widows,” by George Totten Smith, with all original lyrics by Gus Fay and music by Adolph Silberman. Many new and startling features are promised with this, including a strong vaudeville bill and a fine chorus carefully selected. …

Boston Herald (Massachusetts), February 24, 1914

Gaiety Theatre
The Gayety Girls, headed by Gus Fay and a strong cast, were at the Gaiety Theatre yesterday. With a new book and new scenery and equipment the show will attract the patrons of this theatre all the week. … Mr. Fay is supported by Nelle Florede, Edyth Hamilton, Eugene Jerge, light comedian and character actor; Bert Woods, novelty entertainer; Ray Williams and Ada Lum. … 

The Sun (New York, New York), March 1, 1914

In Burlesque Theatres.
Gus Kay will be seen with the Gaiety Girls at the Columbia Theatre this week in a new two act satire called “Schmidt’s Widow.” This is one of the shows that the Columbia Amusement Company points to as an example of the advancement that has been made in this form of entertainment. While retaining the form that distinguishes burlesque, it is said to be clean cut and wholesome and at the same time humorous, presented with scenery, costume, and lighting effects that measure up well with the best standards set in pretentious productions of musical comedy. Between the two acts of the burlesque there is an olio of specialty acts. In Mr. Fay’s support are Nellie Florede, Ada Lum, Rae Williams, Eugene Gerge, Billy Kelly, Edyth Hamilton and Thomas Hodgeman. 

The Sun (New York, New York), March 4, 1914

Gus Fay is appearing with the Gaiety Girls at the Columbia Theatre in a new two act satire called “Schmidt’s Widow.” Between the two acts of the burlesque there is an olio of specialty acts. In Mr. Fay’s support are Nellie Florede, Ada Lum, Rae Williams, Eugene Gerge, Billy Kelly, Edyth Hamilton and Thomas Hodgeman.

New York Clipper, March 7, 1914

The Gayety Girls
Columbia, New York, March 2.
“Schmidt’s Widows” is the burlesque, with the following cast:
Rudolph Schmidt ….. Gus Fay
John James Jones ….. Eugene Jerge
Terrence McNab ….. Billy Kelly
Bud ….. Thomas Hodgeman
Betty, the shop girl ….. Edyth Hamilton
Mrs. Flossie Schmidt ….. Ada Lum
Mrs. Susie Schmidt ….. Rae Williams
Mrs. Beauty Wright ….. Nellie Florede
Models and Shop Girls—Morgan Sisters, Cattell Sisters, La Vann, Cushman, Mayers, Larmon, Griffin, Marlon, Kelly, Wilson, Heldelle, Pierce, Harrington, Chapman, Wilson, Wall, May, Waldron, Burnham, Glenn, Stokes.

The plot is very meagre, but it gives Gus Fay a chance to be funny as the fat German tailor, and to disguise himself for a few moments with a beard as a doctor.

Eugene Jerge appears to excellent advantage as the straight; Billy Kelly plays a perfunctory Irishman.

Edyth Hamilton was a gingery soubrette shop girt; Ada Lum was one of the widows; Rae Williams is a buxom and comely singer.

Nellie Florede sang well as the prima donna, and appeared well in a number of attractive gowns.

The numbers in the first act were “Regiment Band,” by Mr. Jerge; “Girl from Arizona,” by Miss Florede; “Rudolph Schmidt,” by Mr. Fay; “Get Out and Get Under,” put over in lively manner by Miss Hamilton and the active chorus, to several encores; “The Cat Duo,” with “Nobody Love Me-Ow,” featured by Mr. Fay and Miss Hamilton, with several chorus girls selected to do the chorus; “Roseland,” well sung by Miss Williams and Mr. Jerge, with the girls in showy rose costume; a singing and talking sextette, and “Picnic Day,” with the ladies band, American flag, etc., to a lively finish. Ike Wall made a big hit playing the detective in the bomb skit, although not billed on the program.

The olio had Jerge and Hamilton in their catchy act, singing “Como and Kiss Your Little Baby;” “Kentucky Eyes,” by Mr. Jerge with a fine dance by Miss Hamilton, and a good double finish. The International Musical Maids played a brass quartette, “The Rosary” solo, on the French horn, accompanied by the chime, was a big hit, and the brass selections, by six, in which the talky eyed drummer girl stood out, served as encore getter.

Nellie Florede opened with “Mother Machree,” then sung “Your Loving Daughter Handy,” and finished with her trump ace, “My Hero,” striking the high notes true as steel.

The second act is a cabaret scene, the opening song, introducing four Russian dancers and four Americans. “Gambling Man” was sung by Miss Williams; “This Is the Life,” served Miss Hamilton an another winner. Gus Fay did “Fall River Line” with the chorus, frequently interrupted by the three man band, with Ike Wall nonchalantly playing the bass drum; Miss Hamilton, in a natty black dancing suit, led the eight buck and wing hoofers, in white. For the finale, Nellie Florede, in tights, sang “The Heart of Maryland,” with the girls in full tights doing march movements.

Gus Fay enjoyed that part of the show from a seat in the aisle. A “sissy” scene between Mr. Jerge and Mr. Fay was amusing. A table scene did not do so much. The band worked on full time at the drop of the curtain.

The staff: Bob Simons, manager; William Vail, agent; Eugene Jerge, stage manager; Melville Browne, musical director; Gus Fay, dance producer; Joe Mullen carpenter; William Hauford, electrician; Ike Wall, property manager; Alice Wilson, wardrobe mistress. 

Billboard, April 4, 1914

New York Burlesque Reviews
People’s.
Gus Fay and his Gayety Girls played Schmidt’s widow, written in tow acts. Gus Fay needs no introduction here, being one of the cleverest German comedians in burlesque He is ably supported by Eugene Jerge, Billy Kelly, Edyth Hamilton, Ada Lum, Nellie Florede and Rae Williams, not forgetting the chorus. Mr. Hurtig must have picked the cream of all his choruses and placed them in the Gayety Girls, of the girls certainly can hold their own with any Broadway production as far as beauty goes. The book is interesting and overbrimming with comedy, although taken as a whole it should be tamed down a trifle. The audience of the People’s is not of the best class, so that may account for dome of the smut used. The olio was very good. Jerge and Hamilton pleased. The International Model Maids could hold a choice spot on any bill. Nellie Florede was well liked. Business was good and the show played to a responsive audience. A testimonial will be tendered to Sam Granet, the house treasurer, Sunday night, April 19. 

The Sun (New York, New York), April 19, 1914

In the Burlesque Theatres
Gus Fay will bring his “Gayety Girls” to Murray Hill Theatre this week, when the new two act burlesque called “Schmidt’s Widow” will be presented. Mr. Fay is surrounded by an unusually capable cast, which includes Nellie Florede, Eugene Jerge, Johnny Rockwell, Bert Woods, Walter Wilson, Ike Wall, Ada Lum, Edyth Hamilton, Ray Williams and Ester Carnes. … 

The Sun (New York, New York), April 21, 1914

Vaudeville and Burlesque
Gus Fay is presenting his Gayety Girls at the Murray Hill Theatre this week, playing the new two act burlesque called “Schmidt’s Widow.” Mr. Fay is surrounded by an unusually capable cast, which includes Nellie Florede, Eugene Jerge, Johnny Rockwell, Bert Woods, Walter Wilson, Ike Wall, Ada Lum, Edyth Hamilton, Ray Williams and Ester Carnes. … 

Evening Journal (Wilmington, Delaware), April 27, 1914

Avenue Theatre to Open.
The Avenue Theatre will open this evening with musical comedy and motion pictures. Sawyer & Suplee, a well-known theatrical firm of Camden, N. J., who have secured a lengthy lease on the theatre, will present a high class show with the rates of admission five and ten cents, and no higher. Th opening bill will be “Two Gay Old Sports,” a musical offering with a laugh every minute. This will be augmented by five reels of “first run” moving pictures. The company numbers a dozen singers and dancers of note. they include: Virginia Tyson, Ada Lum, a beauty chorus of show girls, Al Taylor, Tony Murphy, and Abe Wolford. The principal characters in the musical comedy will be “Mike” and “Ike.” their wit will keep the audience in constant laughter. …

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), August 23, 1914

Gayety—A special effort has been made with “the Broadway Girls” Company to secure the most elaborate and best trained chorus ever offered the public. Miss Hazel Crosby, the “lady dainty of Burlesque”—the little girl with the big voice, together with Baker and O’Neil, “The Census Takers;” Morris and Campbell in the big scream, “Nearly a Soldier;” Savo, the “Jumping Juggler;” Eddie Van, the character entertainer; Ada Lum, the fascinating soubrette and other complete the cast. The entire company works with vim and snap, and finds ample opportunity for the display of their talents, in two musical comedies entitled, “A Day” and “A Night,” which abound in laughing situations and sensational surprises.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), August 30, 1914

“Broadway Girls” in Two Comedies

Everything points to a most successful engagement at the Grand Thursday, Friday and Saturday, when the “Broadway Girls” will be the attraction. A chorus of twenty pretty young ladies and enough talented principals to equip two ordinary organizations of this character, will appear with the production.

Chief among the funmakers are Joe Morris, the Dutch comedian, a sure laugh-getter; Miss Hazel Crosby, the “Lady Dainty” of burlesque; Baker and O’Neil, the “Census Takers;” Miss Ada Lum, the fascinating contralto; Miss Florence Campbell, the sprightly soubrette; Al K. Hall, the eccentric entertainer; Savi, the jumping juggler, and others.

A very palatable bill of fare has been provided, consisting of two comedies entitled “A Day” and “A Night.” During the action of both these comedies, eighteen exceedingly catchy musical numbers will be introduced by the entire company, affording the ladies ample opportunity to display some magnificent costumes especially designed for “The Broadway Girls” by William Adler of New York. A carload of scenery and electrical effects will give a sumptuous setting in keeping with the character of the entertainment provided.

The usual daily matinees are to be given.

Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), September 2, 1914

“Broadway Girls” at Grand Theatre
The “Broadway Girls” presenting two new and catchy musical comedies entitled “A Day” and “A Night” is underlined as the next attraction at the Grand, formerly the Broad, commencing tomorrow matinee. This organization of comedians and singers is said to be stronger this season than ever and is expected to provide an entertainment that will satisfy the most exacting patrons of burlesque.

The management has provided a company of forty people, including a chorus of twenty girls.

Eighteen of the latest Broadway song hits are introduced, together with novelties and sensational features to sustain the impression. “The Broadway Girls” is declared to be the biggest and best aggregation on the circuit, when it comes to burlesque talent.

Among the well known stars who will take prominent part are Miss Hazel Crosby, the “Lady Dainty of burlesque” assisted by “Little Paul;” Baker and O’Neil, “The Census Takers;” Al K. Hall, the eccentric entertainer; Morris and Campbell, the laughgetters in “Almost a Soldier;” Miss Ada Lum, the contralto; Savo, the jumping juggler, and a host of others. The usual daily matinees will be offered.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), September 3, 1914
Comedy Offerings at Grand Theatre
“The Broadway Girls” show at the Grand, today, tomorrow and Saturday is said to be one of the best equipped and well balanced productions on the burlesque circuit.

Miss Hazel Crosby, the “little girl with the big voice,” has the leading feminine role and is up ported by such performers as Morris and Campbell, Ada Lum, Baker and O’Neil, Al K. Hall, the eccentric entertainer; Savo, the jumping juggler, and others, together with a chorus of twenty girls.

The comedy offerings are “A Day” and “A Night,” and combine original melodies, novel ensembles, and other surprises and novelties. matinees will be given.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), September 4, 1914
Broadway Girls Well Received
Good receptions were given “The Broadway Girls” at the Grand yesterday afternoon and last night.

All the numbers in the company’s two burlesques—“A Day” and “A Night”—were well received. The comedy in the two playlets is breezy. The novelties are many.

Hazel Crosby, an attractive little woman, possesses a pleasing voice. Miss Crosby does well with her song numbers, including “Baby Boy,” “Cradle of Love” and “G. A. R.”

Others in the company who won applause were Joe Morris and Al K. Hall, in the principal comedy parts; Nat Baker, Harry O’Neal, Florence Campbell and Ada Lum, the latter two being conspicuous in the musical parts of the entertainment. …

Few of the patrons realized that Miss Ada Lum enjoys the distinction of being the only Chinese American girl on the American stage today and has a very bright future in store professionally. In an interview she related how she first entered upon her professional career, and gave a short account of her own and her parents’ remarkable life story.

A young Chinese of noble blood came to this country a number of years ago to enter the University of California. Chi Woo Lum had letters of introduction to some of the best families on the Pacific coast and was received in their homes as an equal. Under these conditions he met and fell in love with Miss Lum’s mother, then a budding young debutante. They eloped and were married in Chicago, he entering upon a career of importing merchant at which he was successful. Miss Lum was the issue of this violent love affair, which stirred the entire country, and after an education in a convent had aspirations for a theatrical career, leaving home to join James T. Powers’ company as a show girl with a small speaking part. She afterward joined the Lyric Theatre Stock in New Orleans, which gave her a bast [sic] amount of experience preparing here for her present engagement under the management of Jacobs & Jermon, for leading  business, at which her success was instantaneous.
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), September 19, 1914
“Broadway Girls” Are Next at the Gilmore
The “Broadway Girls” company which comes to the Gilmore Theater the last half of next week, is described as the most meritorious and catchy aggregation organized to tour the burlesque circuit. In the elaborateness of its costume and scenic equipments, as well as in the ability of its cast, and the up-to-date quality of the entertainment provided, “The Broadway Girls” is really a Broadway musical review, because it possess a vim, snap an dash that the others often lack.

Two comedies will be presented entitled, “A Day” and “A Night” and they are brim full of song hits, sensational surprises and unique vaudeville features; leo elaborate scenic and electrical effects. Hazel Crosby, the “Lady Dainty of Burlesque” has the principal female role. She is assisted by Ada Lum, a pleasing contralto; Florence Campbell, a clever soubrette; Joe Morris, a funny Dutch comedian; Save, the jumping juggler; Baker and O’Neil, “The Census Takers”; and Al K. Hall, the eccentric entertainer.

The above aggregation appears not only insoles written especially for each one’s particular talents, but they also perform a number of individual specialties. Mention should nor be omitted of the 20 chorus girls who are pretty and who can sing and dance.
Springfield Union (Massachusetts), September 20, 1914
Gilmore
The Broadway Girls
The “Broadway Girls,” an aggregation of 40 burlesquers, will be at Gilmore Theater, Thursday, Friday and Saturday. with the customary matinees.

Miss Hazel Crosby, the “Lady Dainty of burlesque” has the principal female lead.

All the songs are part and parcel of the show, combining tuneful jingles, ensembles and chorus numbers, and have been written especially for this production. Nothing has been overlooked in the way  of careful and finished interpretation. There are 40 people in the cast, including a chorus of 20 pretty girls who know how to sing and dance.

Morris and Campbell in the big scream sketch, “Nearly a Soldier”; Al K. Hall, the eccentric entertainer; Baker and O’Neil in “The Census Takers”; Savo, the jumping juggler; Ada Lum, the girl with the smile, and others, constitute the olio.
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), September 24, 1914
Gilmore Theater
“The Broadway Girls”
Headed by Hazel Crosby, πthe lady dainty of burlesque,” “The Broadway Girls” are at the Gilmore Theater for the balance of the week, presenting two burlettas, “A Day” and “A Night.” All the songs are part and parcel of the show, combining tuneful jingles, ensembles and chorus numbers, and have been written especially for this production. Nothing has been overlooked in the way  of careful interpretation, and in its entirety the production easily ranks with the best of its kind. There are 40 people in the cast, including a chorus of 20 pretty girls who know how to sing and dance. Morris and Campbell in the big scream sketch, “Nearly a Soldier”; Al K. Hall, the eccentric entertainer; Baker and O’Neil in “The Census Takers”; Savo, the jumping juggler; Ada Lum, and others who appear in the olio.
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), September 29, 1914
Howard Athenaeum
This week patrons of the Howard are entertained by that clever organization known as the Broadway Girls Burlesquers. Conspicuous among the comedians are Al K. Hall and Joe Morris. Hazel Crosby is a general favorite. Ada Lum, a coubrette [sic] of unusual charm; Florence Campbell, a clever singer; Savo, the jumping juggler, and others were seen. The opening piece is “A Day.” This is followed by “A Night.” …
Brooklyn Standard Union (New York), October 11, 1914
Star.—If one wishes to drive dull care away and have a hearty laugh, a visit to the Star this week, where the Broadway Girls are underlined, will in no wise be amiss. Without exaggeration the production ranks as one of the best of its kind. Two musical comedies entitled “A Day” and “A Night,” written by Abe Leavitt, marks an entertainment especially out of the ordinary, inasmuch as they contain all that is excellent in burlesque and vaudeville. When it is understood that such sterling stars as Hazel Crosby, Ada Lum, Morris and Campbell, Al K. Hall, the eccentric; Savo, the “jumping juggler,” and others, an idea of the magnitude and scope of the production may be had. There are forty people in the cast, including twenty of the daintiest chorus girls on the stage. All the music has bean especially written for this offering, while the scenic and electrical investitures are of the most elaborate and pretentious order. The usual Sunday concerts will be given.
The Sun (New York, New York), October 11, 1914
Brooklyn Varieties.
The Broadway Girls, one of the best of the burlesque companies, will be at the Star theatre this week. “A Day” and A Night” will be the two acts in which the company appears. Hazel Crosby, Ada Lum, Savo and other well known burlesque artists are in the company.
Variety, October 17, 1914
Ada Lum
Ingenue, “The Broadway Girls”
Management Theatrical Operating Co., Season 1914–15

  
Detroiter Abend-Post (Michigan), October 18, 1914
Cadillac Theater

Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), October 20, 1914

Broadway Girls at Trocadero
In addition to two smart burlesques, called “A Day” and “A Night,” the Broadway Girls provided effervescent entertainment at the Trocadero yesterday. The skits were filled with amusing situations and catchy song numbers and ensembles. A feature of the olio was the dancing of “Milo,” whose execution of Oriental gyrations proved highly entertaining. The specialties included Morris and Campbell, in a patter sketch; Al K. Hall, monologue comedian; Baker and O’Neil, in a skit; Savo, the jumping juggler, and Ada Lum, a vivacious comedienne in songs.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), November 7, 1914

Detroit Times (Michigan), December 2, 1914

The next attraction in the Cadillac theater will be “The Broadway Girls,” headed by Hazel Crosby and Al K. Hall. Two breezy burlesques, “A Day” and “A Night” will be presented, singing and dancing numbers being interpolated. Other principals in the cast are Nat Baker, Joe Morris, Harry O’Neal, Florence Campbell, and Ada Lum. In the olio vaudeville specialties will be offered by “Savo,” the jumping juggler; Morris and Campbell, in a skit called “Nearly a Soldier,” and Hazel Crosby, in popular songs.

Detroiter Abend-Post (Michigan), December 6, 1914

Cadillac Theater
Detroit Times (Michigan), December 7, 1914
Cadillac.
Al K. Hall, a lean and lithe comedian, who can die himself into all sorts of knots; Hazel Crosby, of singing ability; Flo Campbell, ditto, and Nat Baker and Ada Lum, the latter said to be the only Chinese soubrette in burlesque, had “The Broadway Girls,” which opened a week’s engagement Sunday, in the Cadillac.

The show presented is above the average offering of its kind and is well-dressed. The inevitable “Tipperary,” sung by Flo Campbell, was one of the hits of the piece because of the fetching way in which Miss Campbell sang it.

The vaudeville interpolations offered several clever acts.
The Independent (Kansas City, Missouri), December 26, 1914
… Miss Ada Lum, the Chinese-American violinist …
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), February 11, 1915
Empire.
The Broadway Girls will be seen at the Empire next week. The author has prepared two new burlettas entitled “A Day” and “A Night,” in which the stars of the troupe will have roles that permit them to display their talents to the utmost degree.

Among the artist traveling with the Broadway Girls are Miss Helen Crosby, the “lady dainty of burlesque,” assisted by “little Paul;” Morris and Campbell, the protean sketch artists, in “Nearly a Soldier;” Ada Lum, the Chinese-American vocalist; Baker and O’Neil in “The Census Takers;” Al K. Hall, the character entertainer; Savo, the jumping juggler, and others; also a beauty chorus of twenty, who will render eighteen of the latest song hits, together with plenty of novelties and sensational features. 
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), February 14, 1915
Empire.
The Broadway Girls will be seen at the Empire this week. The author has prepared two new burlettas entitled “A Day” and “A Night,” in which the stars of the troupe will have roles that permit them to display their talents to the utmost degree.

Among the artist traveling with the Broadway Girls are Miss Helen Crosby, the “lady dainty of burlesque,” assisted by “little Paul;” Morris and Campbell, the protean sketch artists, in “Nearly a Soldier;” Ada Lum, the Chinese-American vocalist; Baker and O’Neil in “The Census Takers;” Al K. Hall, the character entertainer; Savo, the jumping juggler, and others; also a beauty chorus of twenty, who will render eighteen of the latest song hits, together with plenty of novelties and sensational features. 
Daily Nonpareil (Council Bluffs, Iowa), March 21, 1915
Broadway Girls at Gayety.
Musical comedy of a high degree of merit will be personified by the “Broadway Girls,” a talented aggregation of forty burlesquers at the popular Gayety theater starting this afternoon with the customary matinee. It is seldom such a production has been brought to the attention of local seekers of amusement; those who love to be entertained in a manner befitting any environment, should find capital enjoyment in the two offerings “A Day” and “A Night.”

Hazel Crosby, the “Lady Dainty of Burlesque,” has the principal female lead. She possesses a petite and handsome figure, and a voice only second to Tettrazzini’s.

All the songs are part and parcel of the show, combining tuneful jingles, ensembles an chorus numbers, and have been written especially for this production. Nothing has been overlooked in the way of careful and finished interpretation, and in its entirety the production easily ranks with the best of its kind.

There are forty people in the cast, including a dashing chorus of twenty pretty girls who know how to sing and dance and look bewitching; Morris and Campbell in the big scream sketch “Nearly a Soldier;” Al K. Hall, the character entertainer; Baker and O’Neil in “The Census Takers;” Savo, the jumping juggler; Ada Lum, the girl with the smile, and others constitute the vaudeville olio. Taken in all, a treat of unusual proportion may be reasonably expected—a veritable feast at once for the eye and ear.
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), March 21, 1915
Gayety—“The Broadway Girls.”
A special effort has been made with “The Broadway Girls” company to dress the show well and to back the many pretty scenes with equipment which would be above the average in every way.

Hazel Crosby, the “lady dainty of musical burlesque,” together with Baker and O’Neil, “The Census Takers;” Morris and Campbell in the big scream, “Nearly a Soldier;” Savo, the Jumping Juggler; Al K. Hall, the character entertainer; Ada Lum, the soubrette and others complete the cast. The entire company is said to work with vim and snap and finds ample opportunity for the display of their talents in two musical comedies, “A Day” and “A Night.”

Practically all the musical numbers have been composed especially for the production. This aggregation of burlesque and vaudeville at the popular Gayety theater, commencing this afternoon.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 1, 1915
Gayety
Musical comedy of a high degree of merit will be offered by the Broadway Girls in the Gayety theater, next week. Those who like to be entertained in a manner befitting any environment, should find enjoyment in the two farces, “A Day” and “A Night.” Hazel Crosby has the principal role among the woman. She is well-known to burlesque patrons for her good looks and fine singing voice. The musical numbers combine tuneful jingles, with colorful ensembles and pleasing dances which have been written and arranged especially for this production. There are 40 people in the company including a dashing chorus of 20 pretty girls who know how to sing and dance. The vaudeville olio will offer Morris and Campbell in the sketch “Nearly a Soldier.” Al K. Hall, character entertainer, Baker and O’Neil in “The Census Takers;” Savo. the jumping juggler; Ada Lum, “the girl with the smile,” and other clever folk.
Detroiter Abend-Post (Detroit, Michigan), May 2, 1915

 
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 3, 1915
Gayety.
Al K. Hall, the elongated comedian with the Broadway Girls’ show in the Gayety theater this week, is one of the few entertainers on the burlesque stage with more than a hint of originality in his make-up. He is versatile, and has it all over the stage carpenter when it comes to doing odd jobs both behind and in front of the footlights. On the stage he canning, dance, joke and do contortion stunts. In the orchestra pit he can pound the drum of fiddle the violin like a paid-up member of the Musicians’ union. He caps the fun when he occupies a lower right box, and “kids” the members of his company across the footlights.

The show, which is divided into two parts with the usual olio sandwiched in, is interesting from start to finish. The absence of suggestive lines and low-brow comedy stunts is appreciated. The musical numbers, as sung by a chorus of sprightly young ladies in beautiful costumes, are well worth hearing, even if some of them have been decorating the piano for a season or two.

Assisting Hall and Hazel Crosby, a diminutive prima donna; Joe Morris, a “shine” comedian; Nat Baker, who ought to be in business for himself, and Harry O’Neal. Florence Campbell and Ada Lum are two pretty singing girls. Savo, billed as the Jumping Juggler, imitates Charley Chaplin in fair style. Joe Morris and Florence Campbell appear in the olio in a bit of nonsense, entitled “Nearly a Soldier.”
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 26, 1915
“The Daughters of Eve” is announced as next week’s attraction in the Cadillac theater. The show is said to offer good singing and dancing, enjoyable comedy, vaudeville specialties and feature numbers. The company is made up of burlesque favorites such as Eddie Dale, John J. Black, Jimmy Cooper, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer, Sue Milford and Helen Stanley, and a chorus of 20. Many of the musical numbers are stage on a runway which extends through the parquet from stage to lobby. A special feature will be a new pantomime dance, “The Love of Venus,” by Emil Agoust, Simone De Beryl and a company of 16 dancers. The added attraction will be Tokeyta.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 29, 1915
Cadillac.
The Cadillac theater’s offering for next week will be “The Daughters of Eve,” with an entertainment that is said to be new in every respect and equipped with pretty costumes, handsome stage settings and novel electrical effects. The company includes 11 principals and a chorus of twenty girls, many of whom are Detroiters. Eddie Dale, a popular German comedian, is the principal funmaker and in the supporting company will be found Jimmy Cooper, Harry Peterson, Elsie Meadows, Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Sue Milford, Hugh Skelly, Sam Carlton and John J. Black. Two breezy burlesques, “Handsome Dailey” and “The Stockholders” will be presented with 18 singing and dancing numbers as special features many of them staged on the runway which extends from the stage through the parquet, to the lobby. Simone De Beryl, Emil Agoust and a company of fifteen dancers will present a new pantomime dance called “The Love of Venus” while Tokeyta will be seen in a series of Egyptian dances.


Detroit Times (Michigan), June 23, 1915
The Cadillac theater next week will present “The Follies of Burlesque,” the entertainment to consist of two lively musical burlettas, new songs and dances, and a variety of vaudeville and feature acts. New scenery, pretty costumes and novel electrical effects are promised. The company includes George Clark, Jimmy Cooper, Sam Carlton, Lew Brown, Ada Lum, Mabel Clark and Helen Stanley, with a chorus of 20. Eddie Drury’s big quartet will contribute new songs, jokes and comedy stunts; Simone De Beryl, Emile Agoust and company of 16 dancers will present “A La Parisienne,” a new pantomime dance which will be staged with special scenery and costumes.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 26, 1915
Cadillac.
“The Follies of Burlesque,” equipped with pretty new costumes, attractive stage settings and novel electrical effects will be the Cadillac theater offering next week. The company is a large one and numbers many players who are popular in the field of burlesque, including George Clark, Jimmy Cooper, Sam Carlton, Lew Brown, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Mabel Clark. As an added attraction there will be Eddle Drury’s Big quartet, offering the latest songs, jokes and comedy. Simone De Beryl, Emil Agoust and company of 20 will present a pantomime dance. “A La Parisienne;” Ada Lum, Mabel Clark and Helen Stanley will also offer vaudeville specialties. The chorus will have several dashing numbers on the runway.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 28, 1915
Cadillac
A rather good brand of summer burlesque is being dispensed in the Cadillac theater this week by a band of entertainers masquerading under the classic title, “As You Like It.” The performance commences with a ludicrous skit, “The Seminary Girls,” and winds up with “A Day at the Beach,” both burlettas being designed to give the members of the poultry chorus an opportunity to display plenty of lingerie and fleshings as they prance up and down the board runway, over the heads of the spectators. There are a few new faces in the cast. Pretty Helen Stanley, who is popular with Cadillac patrons, is back again. with her are Helen Stuart, Mabel Clark, Ada Lum, Jane Hall, Sam Carlton, George A. Clark and Fred Hall. Numerous song numbers bring out the chorus girls in a variety of skimpy costumes.

In the olio, the Bohemian Four, with Eddie Drury, have a fine harmony singing act. Sunday afternoon they responded to encores until they were out of breath. George Clark does an Irish specialty between the burlesque acts. Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust French Apache dancers are again in the bill.

Jimmy Cooper appears in a tabloid drama called “The Penalty.” It is copied from the terrible scene in “The Vampire,” when the degenerate, whiskey-sodden fool curses and smashed his way to eternity while the vampire mocks. The little sketch is credibly presented, and several numbers of the burlesque troupe who assist, prove themselves capable actors in dramatic roles. Ada Lum plays the part of the Vampire, Jimmy Cooper is featured as the Fool.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 3, 1915
Cadillac
The “Sunshine Girls” in the Cadillac theater next week will offer two burlettas with singing and dancing numbers and feature acts. Wednesday night will be devoted to a special Scotch program and members of Scotch societies will parade to the theater led by pipers. A big feature will be a drill by the chorus in kilts, led by George A. Clark. Special song numbers and comedy stunts will be staged on the runway. Mae West, who claims to be the original “Nell Brinkley girl,” will offer a program of character songs; Eddie Drury’s Bohemian Four, a quartet which scored a big hit last week, will contribute new songs; Emil Agoust and Simone De Beryl will present a new and sensational pantomime dance, and Papinta dancer, will offer a special dancing number. The principal roles in the comedies will be played by Jimmy Cooper, Dave Wohlman, Helen Stuart, Sam Carlton, Mabel Clark, Ada Lum, Jane Hall, Helen Stanley and George A. Clark.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 8, 1915
The Cadillac theater next week will present the “Jolly Grass Widows,” the company offering an entertainment said to be filled with enjoyable singing and dancing, vaudeville specialties and feature numbers. George A. Clark, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Jimmy Cooper, Dave Wohlman and Jane Hall will have leading roles. Feature acts will be provided by Mae West, comedienne; the Bohemian Four in new songs; Emil Agoust and Simone De Beryl in new dances, and Princess Texaco, oriental dancer. The runway will be used in the presentation of song numbers.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 10, 1915
Two breezy burlettas with enjoyable singing and dancing numbers, and vaudeville acts will be presented by “The Jolly Grass Widows,” next week in the Cadillac theater. Players who are favorites with audiences in this theater will have the principal roles in the burlettas while there will be a chorus of twenty pretty and vivacious girls. George A. Clark, Sam Carlton and Jimmy Cooper, will handle the major portion of the comedy work. The company includes Helen Stuart, Mabel Clark, Ada Lum, Fred Hall, Helen Stanley, Dave Wohlman and Jane Hall. New songs and feature stunts will be introduced on the popular runway. Mae West, the “Nell Brinkley girl,” in new character songs; the Bohemian songs; the Bohemian Four in harmony and comedy; Emil Agoust and Simone De Beryl in a new and sensational pantomime act, and Princess Texaco, oriental dancer, will be added features of the entertainment.
 
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 29, 1915
Cadillac theater patrons who have enjoyed the snappy stock burlesque productions in that theater the last 10 weeks will have their last chance to see the present company next week. The final offering will be known as “The Stars of Burlesque.” The principals include Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Hugh Skelly, Harry Peterson, Bill Truehart, Fred Hall, Helen Stuart, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer, Fred Taylor, Olive Le Compte, Harry Levi, Emil Agoust and Simone De Beryl. In addition there will be a chorus of 22 girls and Ethel June and company will give a spectacular diving and swimming act in a big glass tank. Princess Yelleh, in an oriental dance, and Ora-Ental in dances and poses, will be added attractions. The Cadillac will begin the regular season of 1915–16 Aug. 8, with the “Tango Queens” as the opening attraction.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 30, 1915
Cadillac theater patrons who have enjoyed the snappy stock burlesque productions in that theater the last 10 weeks will have their last chance to see the present company next week. The final offering will be known as “The Stars of Burlesque.” The principals include Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Hugh Skelly, Harry Peterson, Bill Truehart, Fred Hell, Helen Stuart, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer, Fred Taylor, Olive Le Compte, Harry Levi, Emil Agoust and Simone De Beryl. In addition there will be a chorus of 22 girls and Ethel June and company will give a spectacular diving and swimming act in a big glass tank. Princess Yelleh. In an oriental dance, and Ora-Ental in dances and poses, will be added attractions. The Cadillac will begin the regular season of 1915–16 Aug. 8, with the “Tango Queens” as the opening attraction.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 31, 1915
Cadillac
The final week of stock burlesque in the Cadillac theater will begin Sunday afternoon. Summer stock shows have drawn big crowds to the Michigan avenue playhouse during the past ten weeks and the players have become favorites with patrons of the theater. Sunday, Aug. 8, the regular season of burlesque will begin with the “Tango Queens” as the attraction. Next week the stock company will be enlarged and will include 16 principals and 22 chorus girls. The musical revues, “A Crowded Hotel” and “Old Mustard,” will be presented by Fred Taylor, Olive LeCompte, Harry Levi, with a closing burletta entitled “Military life,” the principal roles of which will be played by Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton, Jimmie Cooper, Hugh Skelly, Harry Peterson, Bill Truehart, Fred Hall, Helen Stuart, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Fred Taylor, Olive Le Compte, Harry Levi, Emil Agoust and Simone De Beryl. A special feature will be Ethel June and company in a spectacular diving and swimming act in a large glass tank. Princess Yelleh, oriental dancer, and Ora-Ental in a dancing and posing act, will be added attractions.
Detroiter Abend-Post (Michigan), August 1, 1915
Cadillac Theater
Detroit Times (Michigan), August 21, 1915
Cadillac
“The Charming Widows,” a big burlesque and extravaganza production, new in every detail, will come to the Cadillac theater Sunday, to begin a week’s engagement. this show is regarded as one of the top-notch attractions on the Columbia circuit, and the advance sale of tickets is brisk. There is a company of 35, including 22 vivacious chorus girls. The is respondent in new costumes, scenery, and special stage settings and electrical effects. Probably the most interesting feature is the boardwalk runway, extending from the stage right through the audience to the lobby of the theater. On this runway [illegible], the musical numbers are introduced by Eddie Dale, is the commander-in-chief of the fun brigade and his able lieutenants include: Sam Carlton, Hebrew “funster;” Jimmie Cooper, in a straight role; Pauline Palmer, “the ginger girl;” Ada Lum, prima donna; Dainty Helen Stanley, ingenue; Hugh Skelly and Harry Peterson.The claim is made that the chorus is one of the handsomest aggregations of girls in burlesque. Some of the musical numbers were written expressly for the show. There will be a two-act burletta with interpolated specialties. The added attraction is “Sita,” in which Mlle. Simone De Beryl is featured in a sensational dance. This act will be presented with special costumes and stage settings. Fanita will dance and the Panama Four will sing.
Detroiter Abend-Post (Michigan), August 22, 1915
Cadillac Theater
Detroit Times (Michigan), August 23, 1915
Cadillac
All that’s worth while in burlesque is included on the program of “The Charming Widows,” a Detroit-made production that is showing in the Cadillac theater this week. No expense has been spared in making the show one of the best on the big circuit. In addition to a galaxy of star performers, a chorus of exceptionally good-looking Detroit girls, and a co-operative orchestra, there are several good features that add to the success of the bill. Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust appear in a Hindu idol dance that is weird if not wonderful; the Panama-Pacific four have a new lot of harmony songs, and Fanita, an escaped favorite from the sultan’s harem, does the Turkish trot.

Eddie Dale, the funny little Dutchman has charge of the comedy department. As an entertainer he is without peer in burlesque. Assisting him are Pauline Palmer, Sam Carlton, Hugh Skelly, Ada Lum, Jimmy Cooper and Helen Stanley, all of whom became favorably known to Cadillac patrons during the summer stock season. Jimmy Cooper has outfitted himself with a wardrobe that is as extensive as the layout in a Michigan-Ave. clothing store. He has a new suit for every line.

The chorus girls wear many nifty costumes. they spend much of the time gamboling on the runway, extending from th stage to the rear of the house. Special scenery and lighting effect are used in the two acts.
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle (New York), August 29, 1915
Corinthian Theater
“The Charming Widows” Second Attraction in Burlesque House.
An attraction of unusual merit, it is said, has been booked by the Corinthian Theater for the engagement of Exposition week, beginning with a performance tomorrow afternoon. It is “The Charming Widows.” This is a brand new show throughout, and the owners have given it handsome scenery, gorgeous costumes, novel electrical effects and special equipment, it is said. The company consists of thirty-five singers, dancers and funmakers, including a chorus of twenty-two reputed pretty and dashing chorus girls. In addition to a new two-act musical comedy, there will be interpolated singing and dancing numbers, “classy” vaudeville acts, it is declared, and feature numbers.

One of the main features of the show is a runway which runs through the midst of the audience and on which the chorus girls sing and dance. This runway has proved popular in other cities where the show has been seen, it is said. The runway is used throughout the show, and, in addition to the singing and dancing numbers, comedy “stunts” and feature acts are performed on it.

Eddie Dale, a well-known German comedian, who plays the role of Herman Klutz, is said to be one of the best liked fummakers on the circuit. The supporting cast is announced as a “classy” one, embracing such people as Jimmy Cooper, straight character comedian; Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Pauline Palmer, soubrette; Ada Lum, prima donna and leading woman; Helen Stanley, ingenue, and Harry Peterson and Hugh Skelly. An added attraction is “Sita,” a Hindoo dramatic divertisement, in which Mlle. Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust, the noted French dancers, are featured.
Detroit Times (Michigan), September 18, 1915
Cadillac
“The Charming Widows” will open an engagement  in the Cadillac theater Sunday with a show that is said to be entirely new and mounted with handsome scenery, pretty costumes and novel electrical effects. The company consists of 35 people, 20 of whom are pretty and vivacious girls, with good singing voices and ability as dancers. Many of the song and dance numbers will be staged on the runway. The entertainment will be divided into two parts with vaudeville and feature acts. The company is headed by Eddie Dale, and includes Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Hugh Skelly, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer and Helen Stanley. The scenes settings show the Chantilly Yacht club in France and the polo grounds at Long Island. “Sita,” a Hindoo dramatic divertissement, featuring Mlle. Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust in a thrilling and sensational dance, will be staged with special scenery, picturesque costumes and unique electrical effects. “Ma Cherie,” a dancing novelty, and Mlle. Ooma, Egyptian dancer will be other attractions.
Detroit Times (Michigan), September 20, 1915
Cadillac.
the company which made many friends in the Cadillac theater this summer in a several weeks’ season of stock burlesque, is back again this week, under the name of “The Charming Widows.” The Sunday audiences welcomed the members of the company warmly.

Eddie Dale, an eccentric character comedian, is ably assisted in the fun by Sam Carlton,Jimmy Cooper, and Harry Peterson, while Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley and Ada Lum lead the feminine portion of the company in songs and dances.

Special feature acts are contributed by Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust, whose sensational dancing and pantomiming is well known to Cadillac patron; Mlle. Ooma, oriental, and Norbet Sinai.

The show has new scenery and costumes.
Grand Rapids Press (Michigan), September 25, 1915


Englewood Economist (Chicago, Illinois), September 29, 1915
Englewood Theatre
Princess Kalama, Hawaiian Beauty, Greatest Sensation Ever in Englewood
The Charming Widows—The Big Show—Coming Next Week.
“The Charming Widows.”
A boardwalk runway, similar to the one used in the “Maid in America,” shown at the Palace Theatre, downtown, all Summer, and on which a chorus of 20 pretty, shapely and vivacious girls sing and dance, is the big feature of the “Charming Widows.” [missing text] in another specialties. Eddie Dale, German comedian, is the principal funmaker and the supporting company includes Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Hugh Skelly, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley and a chorus of twenty vivacious girls.
Echo de L’ouest (Minnesota), October 15, 1915
Au Gayety
Une nouveauté en fait de bur­lesque viendra au Gayety la semaine prochaine. Les “Charming Widows” ont causé une. sensation partout où elles ont paru. Cette représentation a été richement montée, les costumes sont nouveaux et les effets électriques merveilleux. Pour représenter ce burlesque musical la direction a choisi un groupe de bons chanteurs, danseurs et comédiens y compris un chœur nombreux. Eddie Dale comédien allemand joue le rôle principal, celui de Herman Klutz. Des artistes tels qae Sam Carlton, comédien juif, Jimmy Cooper, Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Harry Paterson font aussi partie de cette troupe. Une inovation de cette représentation est une plateforme qui s’étend dans l’auditoire.

En plus d’un programme de vaudeville, il y a une pièce intitulée “Setta” et introduisant les fameux danseurs Mlle Simone De Beryl et Emil Agoust. Cet acte est riche ment représenté.
The Appeal (St. Paul, Minnesota), October 23, 1915
The Charming Widows
The Attraction at the Star Theatre Next Week.
Eddie Dale, the popular little German comedian whose methods of funmaking are quiet but highly effective, is at the head of The Charming Widows, a brand new production which will come to the Star Theatre Sunday, Oct. 24th. The show is gorgeously mounted with scenery, pretty costumes and unique electrical effects and the presenting company includes some of the best known stars in Burlesque. Mr. Dale is assisted by Jimmy Cooper, Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Hugh Skelly, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Pauline Palmer and a chorus of twenty pretty girls. A boardwalk runway on which the girls sing and dance, in the midst of the audience is a big feature of the show. Another high class feature is ‘Sita,’ a Hindoo dramatic divertisement in which Mlle. Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust, the noted French dancers are featured.
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), October 30, 1915
 
 
Cincinnati Post (Ohio), December 13, 1915
Olympic—“Good!” said Sunday’s audiences of Manager Hart’s show, the “Charming Widows.” An Apache dancer, by Simone Se Beryl and Edwin Agoust, was heartily appreciated. Norbert Sinai, violinist, can play. Helen Stanley, Pauline Palmer, Ada Lum, Jimmy Cooper and Eddie Dale, German comedian, are live wires.
Tägliches Cincinnatier Volksblatt (Cincinnati, Ohio), December 13, 1915
Olympic Theater
Baltimore Sun (Maryland), January 9, 1916
The Gayety
The boardwalk runway on which a chorus of 20 girls sing and dance is a feature of the Charming Widows Burlesque a show at the Gayety this week. The runway extends from the stage through the orchestra to the rear of the auditorium and enables the audience to see the actors at close range. The cast consists of 35 players, including Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton, Hugh Skelly, Harry Peterson, Pauline Palmer, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley. An added attraction will be Emil Agoust and Mll. Simone De Beryl in a dance called “Ma Cherie.” William Demetral, the wrestler known as “The Greek Demon,” will meet all comers at every performance during the week.
Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), January 16, 1916
Trocadero—“Ma Cherie,” one of the biggest dance sensations and presented by those clever French dancers, Mll. Simone De Beryl and Emil Agoust, will be the special feature with “The Charming Widows,” this week’s attraction. The company is made up of well known entertainers in the field of burlesque, and the show is resplendent in stunning costumes, handsome scenery, specials rage settings and novel electrical effects. A novel feature is the boardwalk runaway, upon which many of the musical numbers are rendered. The company includes Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Pauline Palmer, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Hugh Skelly and others.


Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), January 18, 1916
“Charming Widows” at Trocadero
Scintillating with bright situations and catchy musical numbers, the entertainment provided by “The Charming Widows” at the Trocadero yesterday met with unstinted favor. There was scarcely a moment during the performance that there wasn’t something doing to please the eye or satisfy the ear. Included in the cast were Eddie Dale, a clever German comedian; Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Pauline Palmer, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and others, to say nothing of the winsome chorus. The latter got into close touch with the audience by traveling the runway which ran from the stage to the back of the auditorium. Mlle. Simone DeBeryl and Emil Agoust, in some bewildering and cleverly executed dances, proved a notable feature of the specialties introduced.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 22, 1916
“The Charming Widow”
An attraction of unusual merit is promised by the Grand Theatre for a five-day engagement, beginning next Tuesday afternoon and continuing through Saturday.

The show is “The Charming Widow” and is a new production. New costumes, scenery and electrical effects have been provided, in addition to a company of thirty-five people. Eddie Dale, the German comedian, is the principal gunmaker, the supporting cast includes Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Harry Peterson, Hugh Skelly, Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley and Ada Lum.

A feature is a boardwalk runway through the audience. Many of the song numbers are introduced on the runway. In addition to a two=act musical comedy, vaudeville and feature will be presented. “Ma Cherie” is an added attraction.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 25, 1916
‘Charming Widows’ at Grand Theatre
“The Charming Widows” will be at the Grand Theatre this afternoon, to begin an engagement of five days. The show, it is said, has been lavishly mounted with handsome scenery, costumes and novel electrical effects. To interpret the book of the merry new two-act musical burlesque, “The Charming Widows,” the management has assembled a company of singers, dancers and gunmakers, including a chorus of twenty girls.

Eddie Dale, the little German comedian, who is who playing the lead, is popular wherever burlesque is played. he has the part of Herman Klutz.

In the supporting cast will be found such players as Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Jimmy Cooper, a clever straight character actor; Pauline Palmer, a dashing soubrette; Helen Stanley, ingenue; Ada Lum, stately leading woman who has an excellent singing voice; Harry Peterson and Hugh Skelly.

A feature of the show is the boardwalk runaway from the stage through the parquet. The song numbers include the popular airs, as well as numbers written for the show. These include: “Wanda,” “There Was a Time,” and “Sailing Down Honeymoon Bay.” In addition to vaudeville acts, there will be presented “Ma Cherie,” in a thrilling dance.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 26, 1916
Burlesque Show Grand Theatre
Patrons of the Grand Theatre yesterday tendered a good reception to “The Charming Widows” burlesque, which opened a five days engagement. Two productions will be given twice daily the remainder of the week. Eddie Dale is the comedian and furnished almost constant laughter. Jimmy Cooper was liked in the “straight” part and Harry Peterson made a hit with his songs.

Pauline Palmer proved “the bundle of animation” which the program called her and Helen Stanley did well as the ingenue. Sam Carlton carried out his comedy part and Ada Lum was an impressive prima donna.

Three specialties were introduced. Nobert Sinai contributed a violin offering, and Cooper and Carlton, a comedy act. The French-Latin quarter number, labeled “Ma Cherie,” was a weird pantomimic act by Mlle. Simone De Beryl and M. Emil Agoust. Mlle. De Beryl also appeared in the cast and did well.

One of the features of the production is the runway that extends into the audience. The chorus girls gain applause for the songs given from the platform.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 27, 1916
‘Charming Widows” in Show at Grand
Lively comedy, entertaining vaudeville acts, special feature numbers and a divertissement called “Ma Cherie” are given in “The Charming Widows,” the burlesque production which is at the Grand Theatre this week.

This show, it is said, is offered here with exactly the same cast which will be employed in its coming New York engagement. Eddie Dale, the German comedian, is at the head of the company, and in the role of Herman Klutz creates continuous laughter. He is assisted by players of experience and ability, including Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Jimmy Cooper in straight roles; Pauline Palmer, who is known as “The Ginger Girl;” Ada Lum, prima donna; Helen Stanley, who has the ingenue role; Harry Peterson and Hugh Skelly. The musical numbers are particularly enjoyable, embracing as they do the latest songs, as well as “Wanda,” “There Was a Time” and “Sailing Down Honeymoon Bay,” which were written expressly for the show.

There is a daily matinee.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 28, 1916
Burlesque Widows at Grand Theatre
A runway, on which a chorus of 20 girls sing and dance is a feature of “The Charming Widows,” the show at the Grand Theatre. The runway extends from the stage, through the parquet, to the lobby of the theatre.

The comedy consists of thirty-five players, including some of the best known entertainers in burlesque. Eddie Dale, German comedian, is the chief gunmaker, and as Herman Klutz has a role which gives him wide latitude for laugh-provoking stunts. He is assisted by a competent corps of singers, dancers and fun-makers, and his chief lieutenants are Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Hugh Skell [sic], Harry Peterson, Jimmy Cooper, Pauline Palmer, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley. Miss Palmer, who has earned the title of “The Ginger Girl,” is a vivacious and pretty soubrette; Helen Stanley, known as Cupid, is well fitted to the ingenue role.

During the action of the two-part musical comedy the latest song and dance numbers are introduced. These include three special numbers, “Wanda,” “There Was a Time” and “Sailing Down Honeymoon Bay,” which were written especially for the show. An added attraction is “Ma Cherie.” Daily matinees are being given.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 29, 1916
Grand Burlesque Providing Laughs
“The Charming Widows,” burlesque, will code its engagement at the Grand Theatre today. this show, which is regarded as one of the top-notch attractions on the American circuit, is a drawing card.

Eddie Dale, the German comedian, is the commander-in-chief, of the fun brigade, and his lieutenants include Sam Carlton, Hebrew funster; Jimmy Cooper, in a straight role; Pauline Palmer, “The ginger Girls,” Ada Lum, prima donna; dainty Helen Stanley, ingenue; Hugh Skelly and Harry Peterson. The claim is made that the chorus is the handsomest aggregation of girls in burlesque.

The musical numbers include popular songs, as well as “Wanda,” “There Was a Time” and “Sailing Down Honeymoon Bay,” which were written expressly for the show. The first part is supposed to take place on the grounds of the Chantilly Yacht Club in France and the story has to do with the laughable experience of Herman Klutz (Eddie Dale) and Izzy First (Sam Carlton). In the second act the scene shifts to the Polo Grounds at Long island, and Klutz and Izzy are still involved in laughable mixups. Vaudeville specialties are interpolated. There will be afternoon and night performances.
Evening World (New York, New York), February 1, 1916
“The Charming Widows” Live Up to Their Name at Olympic Theatre
An excellent comedy is at the Olympic Theatre on Fourteenth Street. The attraction is “The Charming Widows,” an appropriate designation for the entertainment. There was a large audience last night and that the programme was appreciated was evident from the hearty applause.

Eddie Dale, a veteran in burlesque, is the principal comedian. Those who have seen Dale in the past know his exceptional ability as a funmaker, and those others who may not have had this good fortune have a treat in store for them.

Of the feminine principals Helen Stanley is featured. She is an exceptionally pretty girl with a good singing voice and plays a soubrette role with vivacity and charm. Pauline Palmer and Ada Lum are seen in the other leading parts. Both play them in a capable manner.
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), February 8, 1916
Academy of Music
This week the “Charming Widows” Company holds forth at the Academy of Music. The “widows” with the aid of male athletes, cavort entertainingly during two acts and six scenes. There are fifteen musical numbers in the show and all are catchy. The scenic embellishments and costumes look good. In some instances, the latter might be more ample—but, then again, the adage, “Beauty unadorned is adorned the most,” should be considered. The cast of “Charming Widows” is as follows:

“Count Delovesky,” in love, Harry Peterson; “Lotta Pep,” Pauline Palmer; “Izzie First,” always last, Sam Carlton; “Jimmy Touch,” a con man, Jimmy Cooper; “Hughie Davenport,” Hugh Skelly; “Mrs. Experience,” Ada Lum; “Cupid,” Helen Stanley; “Herman Klutz,” nearly a sport, Eddie Dale.

The synopsis of the silly but never the less somewhat amusing entertainment is as follows—according to the press agent:

“Before the action of the play ‘Jean Maxim,’ a man about town, on a visit to the Folies Bergeres Music Hall, in Paris, has seen ‘Ma Cherie’ in her posing act, and has fallen in love with her. His friends have nicknamed him ‘Mon Cherie.’ After a quarrel she leaves him for the ‘Baron,’ who has plenty of money.

“In the scene which follows they meet after the termination of their encounter. ‘Jean,’ in his disordered state of mind, sees ‘Ma Cherie’posing as when he first fell in love with her at the music hall. The end.”

Next week the “Auto Girls.”
New York Clipper, February 12, 1916
Charming Widows Use Runway.
The first burlesque show to hit New York with an illuminated runway half way up the orchestra was the Charming Widow*, at the Olympic, last week, and in nearly all the numbers the girls promenaded and pranced above the heads of the patrons sitting near the gangway. It evidently made a hit, as all of them were applauded for several encores, and the entire show gave good satisfaction.

The opening chorus showed the girls in attractive Persian trouser effect in white and orange, and they put over a lively musical sequence en titled “In Gay Paree.”

Harry Petersen, with a very strong voice, was the first to lead a number in “Ragapation” for which he showed due activity, well backed by the girls. “Same Sort of a Girl” served Ada Lum for an encore getter, and Pauline Palmer was a veritable whirligig for her share of the entertainment, with “Home Was Never Like This.” Little Helen Stanley, dainty and demure, had a fishing rod, with which she angled, and her singing caught plenty of applause. The girls also strolled out on the gangway and cast their lines. One of them caught a package of “Meccas.” Ada Lum came back for another go at them, with “Sailing Down Honeymoon Bay.”

Pauline Palmer is a vivacious worker, not at all averse to showing her shapely proportions.

Ada Lum, tall and stately, showed well In a black widow’s gown. …

In the second act the numbers include: “The Polo Girls,” “Wanda,” by Miss Palmer; “Sprinkle Me with Kisses,” by Miss Stanley; “Vive L’Amonr,” by S. De Beryl; a duet by Ada Lum and Eddoe Dale, “Alabama Cotton Ball,” specialty by Cooper and Carlton, “Tango Trot,” “Memories of Old Home Town” and the Apache dance by S. De Beryl. …
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), February 27, 1916
Howard Athenaeum
Burlesque, pretty firs, clever comedians will be found at the Howard Athenaeum this week. The company is the “Charming Widows,” and the organizations said to be one of the best equipped on the circuit. They open with a clever burletta, “Regatta Day at Chantilly, France.” Eddie Dale si the principal comedian. In the role of Herman Klutz his fun making ability shows to advantage. Ada Lum will be seen as “Mrs. Experience,” the charming widow. Pauline Palmer, soubrette, has a fine voice. Harry Peterson, Helen Stanley, Jimmy Cooper, Sam Carlton and Hugh Skelly are well known favorites. …
The Sun (New York, New York), March 19, 1916
Variety in Brooklyn
Star Theatre—“The Charming Widows” will be the attraction this week for the patrons of the Brooklyn Star Theatre. The presenting company is composed of Eddie Dale, Jimmy Cooper, Henel Stanley, Sam Carlton, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer and Harry Peterson.
The Sun (New York, New York), March 28, 1916
“The Charming Widows” appeared last night at the Yorkville Theatre in a combination of burlesque and vaudeville more attractive in many ways than previous entertainments given there. The company included Eddy Dale, Sam Carlton, Jimmy Cooper, Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, Harry Peterson and Hugh Skelly.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), April 8, 1916

 
At the Majestic
“The Charming Widows,” a big burlesque and extravaganza production, which is new in every detail, will come to the Majestic Theatre on Wednesday to begin a four-day engagement. This show, which is regarded as one of the top notch attractions on the American Circuit, is a big drawing card and the advance sale of tickets is brisk. The company is made up of some of the best known entertainers in the field of burlesque and in all there are thirty-five people, including twenty chorus girls. The show is resplendent in new and stunning costumes, handsome scenery, special stage settings and novel electrical effects. The management has tried to get away from the stereotyped brand of burlesque and has interjected a variety of novelties into the production. Eddie Dale, the clever little German comedian, is the commander-in-chief of the fun brigade and his able lieutenants include Sam Carlton, Hebrew funster; Jimmy Cooper, in a straight role; Pauline Palmer, “The Ginger Girl;” Ada Lum, prima donna; dainty Helen Stanley, ingenue; Hugh Skelly and Harry Peterson.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), April 10, 1916
At the Majestic
“The Charming Widows”
Eddie Dale, the popular little German comedian whose methods of funneling are quiet but highly effective, is at the head of “The Charming Widows,” a brand new production which will come to the Majestic Theatre Wednesday. The show is gorgeously mounted with scenery, pretty costumes and unique electrical effects and the presenting company includes some of the best known stars in burlesque. Mr. Dale isa assisted by Jimmy Cooper, Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Hugh Skelly, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Pauline Palmer and  chorus of twenty pretty girls. A boardwalk runaway on which the girls sing and dance, in the midst of the audience, is a big feature of the show. “The Girl in the Muff” will be the added feature.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), April 11, 1916
At the Majestic
Patrons of the Majestic theatre have a big treat in store Wednesday when “The Charming Widows” will be presented. This big burlesque is new in every particular and the owners have expended thousands of dollars in new costumes and handsome scenery. The company, too, numbers some of the best known players in burlesque, Eddie Dale, German comedian, who is well known and popular, is the principal gunmaker, while the supporting cast includes Jimmy Cooper, Helen Stanley, Sam Carlton, Ada Lum, Pauline Palmer, Harry Peterson, Hugh Skelly and a chorus of twenty girls. “The Girl in the Muff” will be the special feature of “The Charming Widows” during the Wilkes-Barre engagement.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), April 13, 1916
same advertisement as April 8
Johnson City-Endicott Record (New York), April 15, 1916

 
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 6, 1916
Cadillac
Replete with novel features, tuneful and colorful ensemble, whirlwind fun and classy vaudeville acts, “The Charming Widows” show will come to the Cadillac theater Monday afternoon for a week’s engagement. A company of 35 people, including pretty and gingery chorus girls, is employed and the entertainment is a merry mixture of singing, dancing and funmaking. Eddie Dale, well known popular comedian will have the leading comedy role and the supporting cast will include Helen Stanley, Pauline Palmer, Ada Lum, Sam Carlton, Harry Paterson, Jimmy Cooper and Hugh Skelly. “The Eight Royal Hula Hula’s” and “The Girl in the Muff,” are extra attractions.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 8, 1916
Cadillac
“The Charming Widows” are back in the Cadillac, this week, as charming as ever, and supporting an assortment of talent well known to Detroit Burlesque fans. Pauline Palmer, Helen Stanley and the statuesque Ada Lum are all well known here, and with their work in the principals parts, the show can well bear repetition. It has been on the Cadillac boards before, although the spectacular pantomime staged by Emil Agoust gives way to new olio features—the “girl in the muff,” and a swirling dancing specialty. Clare, a clever guitarist who gets enough tone from his solos to fill the theater and gives an added note to the orchestra for the dance music, performs with Olivetti and Moffatt, the dancers. …
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 3, 1916
Cadillac
In the Cadillac theater next week “The Parisian Beauties” will offer a production that is said to be equipped with handsome new scenery, pretty costumes and novel electrical effects. The company is a large one and includes many players who are popular in Detroit. Two lively new burlesques will be presented, each plentifully supplied with singing and dancing numbers. The skits “Over the Garden Gate” and “A Night at Canfield’s” are said to be rapid in action and full of good comedy. The company is head by Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton, William Trueheart, Ada Lum, Dolly Morrisey, Helen Stanley, John O. Grant, Harry Peterson and a chorus of 20 gingery girls. The added attractions for the week will be La Medici and her Parisan models in a posing act staged with special settings and electrical effects, and Ora-Ental, classical dancer.
Detroiter Abend-Post (Michigan), June 4, 1916
Cadillac Theater.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 5, 1916
Cadillac
The old standbys of the Cadillac, “The Parisian Beauties,” are in evidence in this week’s bill. The girls apparently make as good “Parisian beauties” as they do “charming widows” or other sorts of alluring women folk. W. H. Trueheart, who plays one of the male leads, is a; newcomer, but Eddie Dale, Sam
Carlton, and John O. Grant, always appreciated by his fellow townsmen here, together with Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Dolly Morrissey, furnish the staple part of the show. …
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 6, 1916
Cadillac
The old standbys of the Cadillac, “The Parisian Beauties,” are in evidence in this week’s bill. The girls apparently make as good “Parisian beauties” as they do “charming widows” or other sorts of alluring women folk. W. H. Trueheart, who plays one of the male leads, is a newcomer, but Eddie Dale, Sam
Carlton, and John O. Grant always appreciated by his fellow townsmen here, together with Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Dolly Morrissey, furnish the staple part of the show.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 17, 1916
Cadillac
The Cadillac theater will present “The Innocent Maids” next week. The show is said to be new in costumes, scenery and material, while the presenting company includes many players who have made their mark in the field of burlesque. Eddie Dale and Sam Golden are the principal funmakers and will have good roles in two new burlesques. Ada Lum, Dolly Morrisey and Helen Stanley are the leaders of the feminine contingent. In addition to the principals there is a chorus of 20 girls in addition to 18 new singing and dancing numbers there will be several good vaudeville acts. The added attractions for the week will be “Ultra Violet Ray,” a unique and weird dancing act in which an electrical X-ray type apparatus is employed, and Ayesha-Hara, classical dancer.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 19, 1916
Cadillac
The home favorites of the Cadillac company give a farewell engagement, this week, extending themselves to the limit in broad roistering burlesque and giving in delectable style the best of the stunts that the local playgoers like. With never failing resourcefulness, Manager Sam Levy varies »he staple laugh and the girl numbers in providing a real sensation with a skeleton dance number, in which an animated framework of human bones seems to dance with uncanny agility. With the shrieking music and blackened stage, this ghastly dancer can throw the creeps into the most jaded.

“Ultra Violent Ray” is the title of the act. made up for the most part of posing. Brilliant suits—butterflies, beetles, statues, harlequins—are flashed by a magic lantern mechanism on the adaptible [sic] physique of a model clad in tights.

“The Innocent Maids” is the title of the burlesque. Helen Stanley, baby-faced and flaxen-haired, looks good, but falls short of expectations. John O. Grant, whom everybody applauds as “home stock,” foregoes his usual handsome-and-sportive young man role for a howling comedian part, paring off with W. H. Trueheart. They are “Hungry” Bill and Mike on a desert Island full of girls, “where the foot of man has never rested.”

Ada Lum takes an imposing role—Madame Teacham—and sings as acceptably as ever. Dolly Morrisey catches the fans with a baseball song number, and Helen Stanley is irresistible.

Jimmy Cooper is on deck this week with one of his straight burlesque parts, while Harry Peterson is there with his brass band voice. The chorus come to the forefront with individual specialities, each one numbered and called out by the audience.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 28, 1916
Next week in the Cadillac theater the “Moulin Rouge Girls” will offer a varied entertainment to include two new burlesques, vaudeville acts and plenty of singing and dancing. The company includes Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton, Hugo Kelly, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Dolly Morrisey, Helen Stanley and a chorus of 20 girls. The added attractions for the week will be La Tunita, classical dancer, whose act will be staged with special scene and electrical effects.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 1, 1916
Cadillac
Next week’s entertainment in the Cadillac theater will be furnished by the “Moulin Rouge Girls,” an organization made up of some of the best known players in burlesque. The company includes Eddie Dale, Sam Carleton, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Dolly Morrisey, Jimmy Cooper and several others. In addition to the principals there is a chorus of 20 girls. With this production the Cadillac begins its season of summer shows and the hot weather programs will be continued until the beginning of the regular season late in August. The “Moulin Rouge Girls” will offer two lively burlesques, a variety of good vaudeville acts and plenty of singing and dancing. New song numbers have been arranged. La Tunita, classical dancer, will stage her act with special scenic and electrical effects.

 
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 6, 1916
Two new burlesques will be staged by the Cadillac theater summer company next week. Each will offer plenty go good singing and dancing, and new vaudeville acts. Eddie Dale, Jimmy Cooper and Sam Carleton will have the leading comedy roles, while Ada Lum and Helen Stanley are the leading women. There is also a chorus of 20 girls. The burlesques are called “Materia Medica” and “At Coney Island.” One of the olio acts will be contributed by Hazel Ray and Alma Fern, clever singers, dancers and pianists. The added attraction for the week will be “Midsummer Missions,” a posing act in which a bevy of pretty girls will be employed.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 7, 1916
Two new burlesques will be staged by the Cadillac theater summer company next week. Each will offer plenty of good singing and dancing and new vaudeville acts. Eddie Dale, jimmy Cooper and Sam Carlton will have the leading comedy roles, while Ada Lum and Helen Stanley are the leading women. There is also a chorus of 20 girls. The burlesques are called “Matera Midica” and “At Coney Island.” One of the olio acts will be contributed by Hazel Ray and Alma Fern, clever singers, dancers and pianists. The added attraction for the week will be “Mid-Summer Missions,” a posing act in which a bevy of pretty girls will be employed.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 8, 1916
Cadillac
In the Cadillac theater, next week, the “Cadillac Maids” will offer alively burlesque entertainment, said to be mounted with new scenery and pretty costumes, novel singing and dancing numbers. The summer stock company retains as lending comedians Eddie Dale, Sam Carleton and Jimmy Cooper. The musical skits to be presented are called “Materia Medica,” the scene being a doctor’s office, and “At Coney Island,” which are declared to be rapid in action and replete with good comedy. Of the feminine contingent Ada Lum, Dolly Morrisey and Helen Stanley are the leaders and will he assisted by a score of good looking chorus girls in the song numbers. In the olio, good vaudeville acts including Hazel Ray and Alma Fern, singers, dancers and pianists, will be offered. The special attraction for the week will be “Mid-Summer Visions,” an artistic posing act in which a number of pretty girls will he employed.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 13, 1916
Next week the Cadillac theater will offer “The Follies of Burlesque,” which is said to be an up-to-date entertainment offering good singing and dancing, clean comedy and enjoyable vaudeville acts. Eddie Dale, Sam Carleton, Jimmy Cooper, Dolly Morrisey, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley head the company. The chorus will present 15 new singing and dancing numbers. A special feature dancing act will be the added attraction.
Detroit Times (Michigan), August 5, 1916
Two new burlesques will be staged by the Cadillac theater summer company next week. Each will offer plenty of good singing and dancing and new vaudeville acts. Eddie Dale, jimmy Cooper and Sam Carlton will have the leading comedy roles, while Ada Lum and Helen Stanley are the leading women. There is also a chorus of 20 girls. The burlesques are called “Matera Medica” and “At Coney Island.” One of the olio acts will be contributed by Hazel Ray and Alma Fern, clever singers, dancers and pianists. The added attraction for the week will be “Mid-Summer Missions,” a posing act in which a bevy of pretty girls will be employed.
Detroiter Abend-Post (Michigan), August 6, 1916

 
Echo de l’Ouest (Minneapolis, Minnesota), August 25, 1916
Au Gayety
Dans “The Charming Widows” l’attraction de la semaine prochaine au Gayety on y verra entremêlés, du burlesque, de la comédie musicale et du vaudeville. Tout y est nouveau, .décors, costumes et effets électriques. La troupe est nombreuse et contient des artistes qui se sont fait une renommée dans le burlesque et la comédie musicale, Eddie Dale, Cooper et Sam Carlton principaux commédiens une excellente occasion de faire valoir leurs talents dans deux pié cettes: “A Busy Day at the Bon Marché” et “Rival Hotels”. Ces comédiens sont habilement secondés de Harry Peterson, Norbert Siani, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Connie Fuller, Babe Rya et un chœur de vingt. Kyra et sôs six danseurs Hawaïens donneront une exhibition de leurs danses natives. Siani le violoniste errant rendra des morceaux classiques et populaires.
Duluth News-Tribune (Minnesota), September 10, 1916

 
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), September 12, 1916
“The Charming Widows,” a new edition of the show which caused such a furore along the circuit, comes to the Odeon Theater Thursday and Friday. New scenery, new costumes, new comedy and on fact everything new has been promised by the management. Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton, Connie Fuller, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Harry Peterson are some of the principals while there is a chorus of twenty pretty and vivacious girls. Kyra and a corps de ballet in a series of classical dances will be a special attraction. This act is elaborates staged and is thrillingly presented by the danseuse and a large supporting company. Odeon.
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), September 14, 1916
Tonight: “Charming Widows.”
Odeon Brings Big Burlesque Show Here for Two Nights.
A new two act burlesque in eight scenes will be presented by “The Charming Widows,” the big musical production which is booked at the Odeon Theater for tonight and Friday night. The show is new in every respect and is handsomely mounted with new scenery, pretty costumes, and novel electrical effects. The presenting company includes such well known funmakers as Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton and Harry Peterson. while the feminine contingent includes Ada Lum, Connie Fuller, Babe Ray, Helen Stanley and a chorus of twenty pretty girls. Kyra and a chorus de ballet in a series of classical dances will be a special attraction. Odeon.
South Bend News-Times (Indiana), September 29, 1916
“The Charming Widows.”
“The Charming Widows,” a new burlesque show will come to the Oliver theater on Friday Oct. 6. New scenery, new costumes and new comedy has been promised by the management. Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton, Connie Fuller, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Harry Peterson are some of the principals while there is a chorus of pretty girls. Kyra and a corps de ballet in a series of classical dances will be a special attraction.
Elkhart Daily Review (Indiana), September 30, 1916
“The Charming Widows.”
The Oliver theater, South Bend, will on Friday, October 6, will present the big burlesque spectacle, “The Charming Widows.” With but one exception the show is entirely new, that being the popular runway on which principals and chorus girls cavort right in the midst of the audience. Many new song and feature numbers have been arranged for presentation on the runway. The laughmakers include Eddie Dale, Sam Carlton and Jimmie Cooper. During the action of the show good vaudeville acts will be introduced by Kyra and her six Hawaiian girls in a comedy skit: Eddie Dale and Ada Lum in songs and jokes and Siana, the wandering violinist, in classical and popular airs. A big feature will be Kyra and a corps de ballet in an elaborate arrangement of classical dances including Greek, Egyptian, Hindu and East Indian.
Terre Haute Tribune (Indiana), October 1, 1916
Will Use Runway at Grand Today
The popular runaway on which principals and chorus girls render song and feature numbers in the very midst of the audience has been retained as one of the big features in “The Charming Widows,” the big burlesque production which comes to the Grand this afternoon for a stay of three days. In planning the 1916–17 edition of the “Widows,” Mr. Sam Levey, the producer, determined that while everything else would be new the, runway could not be discarded. It is a distinctive feature of the entertainment and one that the public has thoroughly appreciated. The show will be presented in two acts and eight scenes and the audience will be taken by easy jumps from ’Frisco to Paris. Along the route there is constant jollification, rapid fire comedy, good singing and dancing and a large bevy of gorgeously gowned girls. Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper and Sam Carlton, a trio of laugh producers hard to beat, are the generals of the comedy brigade and they are supported by a capable company. Connie Fuller, Babe Ray, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Norbert Siani and Helen Stanley have important roles, while there is a chorus of twenty girls. “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche” and “Rival Hotels” are the titles of the two acts and during the action new singing and dancing numbers will be presented. There will also be an interesting collection of vaudeville acts, including Carlton and Cooper in “Bunch of Nonsense,” Ada Lum and Eddie Dale in songs, dances and jokes, Siani, the wandering violinist, and Kyra and her six Hawaiian dancing maids. A big feature act will be Kyra and a corps de ballet in a series of classical dances including Greek, Egyptian, Hindu and East Indian. These dances are entitled “Blue Bird,” “Egyptian Frieze Dance,” “Hindu Cobra Dance” and “Sacrifice to Buddha,” the latter being the big feature. The act will be elaborately mounted with special scenery, costumes and novel electrical effects.
Terre Haute Tribune (Indiana), October 2, 1916
Stage Jottings
review of “The Charming Widows”
… and Ada Lum, the Chinese prima donna. Miss Lum is really the daughter of a Chinese educator and a California school teacher.
South Bend News-Times (Indiana), October 6, 1916
“The Charming Widows.”
Replete with good singing and dancing, plenty of rapid lire comedy and liberally sprinkled with feature acts, “The Charming Widows,” the big burlesque production will come to the Oliver theater this evening. The show is said to be gorgeously costumed, the scenery handsome, new effects in electrical lighting are promsed [sic], while the presenting company is composed of experienced players. The show is entirely new and probably only one feature of last season’s entertainment has been retained. That is the running board on which the principal and chorus girls render song numbers in the midst of the audience. New numbers for presentation on this board have been prepared. The company is headed by Eddie Dale, German comedian, and Jimmie Cooper, straight comedian, while the supporting company includes Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Babe Ray, Connie Fuller, Harry Peterson, Norbert Sinsi, and Sam Carlton, the latter being a clever Jew comedian. There is also a chorus of attractive girls and in the song numbers they will display a great variety of gorgeous gowns and novel costumes.
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), November 5, 1916

 
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), November 6, 1916
same advertisement as November 5
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), November 7, 1916
same advertisement as November 5
The Charming Widows
Up-to-date burlesque, not the stereotyped brand, will be offered by “The Charming Widows,” in the Grand theater tomorrow. The show is replete with good singing and dancing and plenty of good comedy. The leading comedy roles are played by Eddie Dale, Jimmy Cooper and Sam Carlton, a trio if funmakers who have no equal in burlesque. The supporting company includes Harry peterson, Herbert Sinai, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Connie Fuller, Babe Ray and a singing and dancing chorus of twenty pretty girls. Many of the song and dance numbers will be introduced on a runway which extends from the stage out into the mist of the audience in the parquet. During the action of the show vaudeville acts will be offered by Kyra and her six Hawaiian dancing girls: Carlton and Cooper in a comedy skit called “A bunch of nonsense;” Eddie Dale and Ada Lum in songs and jokes, and Siana, “the wandering violinist.” A big feature will be provided by Kyra and a corps de ballet. It is  an elaborate arrangement of classical dances including Greek, Egyptian, Hindu and East Indian and will be staged with gorgeous costumes, special scenery and novel electrical effects.—Advertisement.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), November 9, 1916
Empire.
Up-to-date burlesque, not the stereotyped brand, will be offered by Phil B. Isaac’s own show, “The Charming Widows,” at the Empire theater next week. The show is brand new in every respect and is elaborately mounted with new scenery, gorgeous wardrobes and novel electrical effects. The leading comedy roles are played by Eddie Dale, Jimmy Cooper and Sam Carlton, a trio of funmakers who have no equal in burlesque. The supporting company includes Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Connie Fuller, Helen Stanley, Mae Cameron and a chorus of twenty. During the action of the show vaudeville acts will be offered by Kyra and her six Hawaiian dancing girls. A big feature will be provided by Kyra and a corps de ballet.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), November 12, 1916
Phil Isaac’s Own Show the Empire Attraction
The 1916–17 edition of the gorgeous burlesque, Phil B. Isaac’s own show, the Charming Widows, will com to the Empire theater tomorrow for an engagement of one week. Spic and span in new scenery, resplendent costumes, novel electrical effects and much special equipment, the show is even better than last year’s, which was one of the pronounced hits along the circuit.

Mr. Isaac, the produce, has spared no expense and has secured a company of tiptop players for the principal roles as well as a chorus of twenty pretty, vivacious girls. At the head of the company will be found Eddie Dale and Jimmie Cooper, two of the best known funmakers in the field of burlesque. The supporting company includes Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Connie Fuller, Mae Cameron, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley, the latter being known as the doll girl. During the action of the show entertaining specialties will be offered by Cooper and Carlton, Dale and Lum, Kyra and her six Hawaiian girls, Siani, the wonderful violinist, and many others. A special feature will be Kyra and a corps de ballet in classical dances.
The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), November 29, 1916
“The Charming Widows”
From ’Frisco to Paris and continued merriment all the way to the trip that “The Charming Widows” will take at each performance in the Orpheum tomorrow, matinee and night. The show is presented in two acts and eight scenes and is replete with good singing and dancing, and funmaking. Some of the best players in burlesque are found in the company including Eddie Dale, German comedian; Jimmie Cooper, the best straight man in burlesque; Sam Carlton, Jew comedian; Connie Fuller, Harry Peterson, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum and Babe Ray. There is a chorus of twenty pretty and shapely girls.
The Patriot (Harrisburg, Pennsylvania), November 30, 1916
Today—The Charming Widows
A new two-act burlesque in eight scenes will be presented by “The Charming Widows,” the big burlesque production which is booked for the Orpheum today matinee and night. The show is new in every respect and is handsomely mounted with new scenery, pretty costumes and novel electrical effects. the presenting company includes such well known fun-makers as Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton and Harry Peterson, while the feminine contingent includes Ada Lum, Connie Fuller, Babe Ray, Helen Stanley a chorus of twenty pretty girls. Kyra and a corps de ballet in a series of classical dances will be a special attraction.
Evening World (New York, New York), December 19, 1916
Rollicking Burlesque by “Charming Widows” Packs Olympic Theatre
“The Charming Widow,” a burlesque full of fun, singing and dancing, won the favor of a packed house last night at the Olympic Theatre on Fourteenth Street. Among the number of features in the show were Kyra and her sixteen dancing girls. “A Busy Day at Bon Marche,” which is another feature of the performance, was approved of by the audience. Eddie Dale and Jimmie Cooper, who are the principal characters of the show, are capably supported by a large cas. In the company were Sam Carlton, Connie Fuller, Babe Day and Ada Lum.
New York Clipper, December 20, 1916

 
New York Clipper, December 27, 1916
Illuminated Runway was Big Feature in “Charming Widows”
Very much looked up to were the girls with the show at the Olympic, last week especially, when they were disporting themselves on the illuminated runway, which was built straight out over some of the orchestra chairs.

To Eddie Dale, as the Dutchman, and Sam Carlton, as the Hebrew, were assigned the comedy roles, and they handled them in satisfactory manner with the material at command for a number of comical incidents in the corporation and other bits.

Jimmie Sooper [sic] was an energetic straight, who took care that none of his lines were lost, and showed class in style and dress.

Harry Peterson, a forceful shouter, kept up the lively pace.

Ada Lum put over some effective numbers and showed the style of 1950 in a close-fitting union suit and unique headgear.

Connie Fuller did the prima donna in clever style and scored for several goals with her “Hundred Years from Now” number.

Helen Stanley, the doll girl, appeared as a charming Cupid, and a chic ingenue.

The chorus included Hazel Lenoi, Jennie Schaffer, Mae Glyn, Bobbie Roberts, Anna Romaine, Dixie Gray, Bessie Clay, Margaret Alluway, Irene Gracelin, Florence Sage, Maud Baier, Goldie Demille, Evelyn Felds, Sylvia Siegel, May Hamilton, Fay Reynolds.

Mae Cameron, who was an important member of the cast, contributed her ragtime song specialty, including two Hula numbers.

Kyra, with three changes of scene and assisted by the chorus in characteristic embellishments, offered three kinds of terpsichorean selections, which were well liked, especially the snaky arm movements of the cobra dance, displaying great elasticity of those limbs. The idol-worship dance was effectively worked out.

“Rival Hotels” closed the show, with Kyra featured in Hawaiian movements.

Eddie Dale and Ada Lum offered an entertaining specialty, also Cooper and Carlton.

E. W. Edmondson is manager; W. H. Truehart, business manager; P. H. Spagnolo, musical director.
Brooklyn Standard Union (New York), December 28, 1916
Amusement Notes
The Lee Far Dun, a local Chinese society, is arranging a theatre party in honor of Ada Lum, one of the leads of “The Charming Widows,” the attraction at the Gayety Theatre New Year’s week. No date has been selected for the party. It is expected that, the delegation will number 200 or more. Miss Lum. the only Chinese actress in burlesque, is well known to Gayety patrons.
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), January 6, 1917

 
Academy of Music
Academy of MusicThe 1916–17 edition of the burlesque spectacle, “The Charming Widows,” will come to the Academy on Monday for an engagement of one week. Spick and span in new scenery, costumes, novel electrical effects and much special equipment, the show is better than last year’s. Sam Levey, the producer, has secured a company of tip-top players for the principal roles as well as a chorus of twenty pretty vivacious and shapely girls.

The entertainment will be presented in two acts and eight scenes m and throughout new singing and dancing numbers and vaudeville specialties and special attractions will be introduced.

At the head of the company will be found Eddie Dale and Jimmie Cooper. Mr. Dale is a clever German comedian, while Mr. Cooper is one of the best straight men in the business. The supporting company includes Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Connie Fuller, Mae Cameron, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley. The show will open with a breezy musical skit called “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche,” and the scene shows the interior of a department store at San Francisco. “Izzy Samples” sells the rapidly failing business to “Herman Klutz,” and funny situations arise. In the second act “Izzy” and “Klutz” are rival hotel keepers in Switzerland and engage in a scrap every time they meet. During the action specialties will be offered by Cooper and Carlton, Dale and Lum, Kyra and her six Hawaiian girls and others. A special feature will be Kyra and a corps de ballet in classical dances.
New York Dramatic Mirror, January 6, 1917
 Scranton, Pa.
… Majestic: “The Charming Widows” held the boards entire week Dec. 25 to big business.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), January 13, 1917
Burlesque
Trocadero—“The Charming Widows” with Kyra and her six Hawaiian ballet dancers; Eddie Dale, Ada Lum and others.
Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), January 16, 1917
“Charming Widows” at Trocadero
Quite apropos of their title, “The Charming Widows,” won the approval of the audiences at the Trocadero yesterday afternoon and evening. The show is rapid in action, bright in entertaining qualities and studded here and there with that style of music which appeals strongly. “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche” introduced the company in a series of amusing stunts, the action being laid in a department store, with all the ludicrous incidents that are permissible. Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton, Mar Cameron, Connie Fuller, Helen Stanley and Ada Lum were prominent in the cast. “Kyra” and a group of dancers introduced some sensational dancing stunts.
New York Dramatic Mirror, January 20, 1917
Jersey City—Hoboken
Eddie Dale and Jimmie Cooper were at the head of the Charming Widows company at the Academy of Music, 8-13, to capacity. They are clever comedians and have competent support. Kyra and her six dancing maids did some dancing, “The Pacemakers.” 15-20.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), January 20, 1917

 
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), January 25, 1917
At the Majestic
Melody and mirth reign supreme at the Majestic Theatre this week. “The Charming Widows,” a burlesque company of unusual strength, is being featured at the playhouse the last four days of this week. The comedy is of a variety that is bound to please. The company is made up of several star entertainers and a chorus of unusual beauty and sprightliness.

Eddie Dale is the chief funster. He scored a big hit last night and promises to prove one of Wilkes-Barre’s biggest favorites. Others in the company are Sam Carlton, Hebrew comedian; Jimmie Cooper, a straight man; Connie Fuller, Harry Peterson, Helen Stanley, Mae Cameron and Ada Lum. One of the principal features of the evening was a series of dances by Kyra and a ballet. “The Charming Widows” will repeat their performances every afternoon and evening during the remainder of the week.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), January 26, 1917
At the Majestic
One of the cleverest burlesque shows seen in  Wilkes-Barre in many years, is playing at the Majestic Theatre this week. The title of the production is “The Charming Widows” and the company is made up of a score of clever entertainers. Ada Lum, one of the principal players, is scoring an unusual hit. Miss Lum is a talented miss and she is proving one of the popular actresses of the season. Jimmie Cooper and Eddie Dale please as the principal comedians. The burlesque is divided into parts, the first entitled “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche” and second “Rival Hotels.” Both pieces teem with comedy and tuneful melodies. As an added attraction a series of classic dances are given by Kyra and a ballet. For the last four days of next week the Majestic announces La Bergere with “The Pacemakers.”
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 28, 1917
Clever Comedians Coming to Grand
Eddie Dale and Jimmie Cooper Will Appear with “Charming Widows”
Eddie Dale and Jimmie Cooper, two of the best known comedians in the field of burlesque, are at the head of “The Charming Widows,” the big musical burlesque which will hold the boards in the Grand Theatre for an engagement of three days, beginning with a matinee performance Thursday.

Mr. Dale is a clever German comedian while Mr. Cooper is one of the best straight comedians in the business. Sam Levey, who is sponsor for the show, has surrounded this pair with an excellent company, including a big cast of principals and a chorus of 20 singing and dancing girls. The 1916–17 model is even an improvement on last  season’s show which was highly regarded all along the circuit.

The new show is handsomely sounded with gorgeous costumes, beautiful scenery, novel electrical effects and considerable special equipment. It is presented in two acts and eight scenes and provides three hours of merriment. The burlettas are called “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche” and “Rival Hotels,” and the action of each is rapid and replete with good comedy situations. In the cast supporting Mr. Dale and Mr. Cooper will be found Connie Fuller, Mae Cameron, Harry Peterson, Sam Carlton, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley.

In addition to the singing and dancing numbers there will be a variety of good vaudeville acts including Kyra and her six Hawaiian dancing maids; Copper and Carlton, in a skit called “A bunch of Nonsense;” Eddie Dale and Ada Lum, in songs, dances and jokes. A big feature act will be Kyra and a corps de ballet in a series of classical dances including Greek, Egyptian, Hindu and East indian. The dances are called “Blue Birds,” “Egyptian Frieze Dance,” “hindu Cobra Dance” and “Sacrifice to Buddha,” the last being the big feature.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 28, 1917

 
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), January 31, 1917
Song Hits in Show
Popular song numbers and melodies written expressly for the show will be introduced at the Grand Theatre Thursday, when “The Charming Widows” take possession. It is essentially a song and dance show, and the company is 75 percent girls. New gowns and costumes will be shown in the musical numbers. Most of the costumes are out of the ordinary. The company includes some of the best known players in burlesque, including Eddie Dale, German comedian; Sam Carlton, Jimmie Cooper, Connie Fuller, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum and Mae Cameron. The chorus numbers 20 girls.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), February 2, 1917
Clever Burlesque at Grand Theatre
One of the best burlesque shows of the present season is being presented at the Grand Theatre where “The Charming Widows” is the attraction for today and tomorrow. large audiences witnessed the production yesterday afternoon and evening and showed approval by generous applause.

There are many features given with the show including dances by Kyra, who gave some barefoot numbers despite the sudden drop in temperature. Kyra’s dances, however, were well stage and she was assisted by a ballet comprise of girls from the chorus.

Jimmy Cooper was cast in the straight role and Jimmy’s best rick was changing his suit every time he thought about it. Jimmy had as many changes as the chorus and less excuse for making them.

The attraction was elaborately staged and the chorus was well costumed. Eddie Dale gained laughs as the principal comedian, although at times his stuff was more suggestive than humorous. The other principals were a little above those on the average burlesque.

One of the bits of the show was a display of gorgeous gowns worn by women in the past, present and those to be worn in the future. Ada Lum appeared as the girl of 1950 and there the act ended. It’s probably a good thing it didn’t go to 2000.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), February 3, 1917
Widows’ Show to End
“The Charming Widows” close its stay at the Grand Theatre, with the shows this afternoon and evening. Embellished with fine costumes, special scenery, novel electrical effects and a great deal of special equipment the production is even better that last year’s.

The first act is called “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche,” the scene showing the interior of a San Francisco department store. The second act is called “Rival Hotels.” The leading roles in each burletta are played by Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Mae Cameron and Connie Fuller. During the action of the show new singing and dancing numbers are introduced by the principals and a chorus of 20 girls.
The Sun (New York, New York), February 4, 1917
Brooklyn Variety.
Star—”The Charming Widows,” with Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper and Sam Carlton, Ada Lum, Connie Fuller, Helen Stanley and a chorus of twenty are the burlesque offering of the week. The features include “The Models of 1917,” Kyra and Hawaiians.
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), February 10, 1917

 
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), February 15, 1917
Extravaganza at Gilmore
Burlesque, musical comedy and vaudeville are combined in the show given by the company known as “The Charming Widows,” at the Gilmore theater where it opened its stay yesterday, with two large audiences in attendance. The production has been mounted with new scenery and new costumes of which there is a variety and the electrical features are conspicuous. Two burlettas are presented, “A Busy Day at the Bon Marche” and “Rival Hotels.” They afford opportunity for indulgence in extravagant comedy by the principal fun-makers and for the introduction of many musical numbers both of the solo and ensemble class, the chorus doing much with the latter. The leading comedians are Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper and Sam Carlton and they proved popular yesterday. Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Connie Fuller and Harry Peterson, also assist. Kyra does a Hawaiian dance, assisted by six girls and specialties are introduced by Cooper and Carlton, Dale and Lum and others, while there are many special dances.
Boston Journal (Massachusetts), February 20, 1917
Burlesque Shows
A show that lives up to its reputation is the “Charming Widows” burlesque company, which gave every satisfaction at the Howard Athenaeum yesterday afternoon an evening. The company is considered one of the best on the circuit. The show is replete with live comedy and good singing and dancing specialties. Eddie Dale was given a royal welcome. His line of humor is particularly his own. Sam Carlton and Jim Cooper gave an excellent account of themselves. Mr. Carlton won success as a Hebrew comedian, and Mr. Cooper scored as one of the best “straight men” to visit the Howard this season. Other favorites included Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Mae Cameron, Connie Fuller and a chorus of 25 girls who skipped about and made merry in all the musical numbers. Artistic dancing introduced by Kyra proved a big feature. Kean and Fox offered a clever specialty and Billy Moran won favor with a voice of excellence. George Adams introduced a live wire specialty, and Eddie Doherty, comedian, the Johnson sisters and others jumped into popularity. On Washington’s birthday the show will begin at 12, as is customary on all holidays at the Howard.
New York Clipper, February 21, 1917
Ada Lum Married
Ada Lum, prima donna of the “Charming Widows,” has just announced that she was married August 7, 1916, to Frank J. Noonan of Cleveland, O. They will spend a belated honeymoon in San Francisco and Hawaii at the end of Miss Lum’s season. [The Michigan marriage certificate, at Ancestry.com, said she resided in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.]
New York Dramatic Mirror, March 10, 1917
New Bedford, Mass.
Olympia: … The engagement of Sam Levey’s “Charming Widows,” one of the briskest and most unflagging entertainments that has ever been presented here, is conspicuously prosperous. This rigmarole of fun and foolishness stands all the tests of the form of amusement with which this house is identified. Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper and Sam Carlton dominate most of the the fun, but they are able aided and abetted by Harry Patterson, Mar Cameron, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Connie Fuller. Kyra and Her Six Hawaiian Dancing Girls are a big feature. A bevy of stunning pretty chorus girls form a veritable orgy of color and beauty.
Detroit Times (Detroit, Michigan), March 24, 1917
Cadillac.
Beginning with a performance Sunday afternoon, April 1, Detroit’s own burlesque show the “Charming Widow” will come to the Cadillac theater. This show is under the direction of Detroit theatrical promoters and several of the players are Detroiters. The company includes Eddie Dale, Sam Carleton, Jimmy Cooper, Harry Peterson, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Connie Fuller and a chorus of 20 girls. Kyra, classical dancer, will be an added attraction.
Detroit Times (Michigan), March 31, 1917

 
Cadillac
The 1916–17 edition of the “Charming Widows” will be the attraction in the Cadillac theater next week beginning Sunday afternoon. Sam Levey, manager of the Cadillac, is owner of the show. Embellished with new costumes, scenery, novel electrical effects and a great deal of special equipment, the production is said to be even better than last year’s which was the talk of the circuit. Mr. Levey has spared no expense in staging this big burlesque spectacle and has secured a clever aggregation of singers, dancers and funmakers, and original feature numbers. the show is presented in two sets and eight scenes. The first act is called “A busy day at the Bon Marche,”  the scene showing the interior of a San Francisco department store. The leading roles in each burletta will be played by Eddie Dale, Jimmie Cooper, Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Mae Cameron, Connie Fuller, Helen Stanley and Ada Lum. During the action new singing and dancing numbers will be introduced by the principals and a chorus of 20 girls. Feature acts will include Kyra and her six Hawaiian girls; Copper and Carlton, in a comedy skit, Eddie Dale and Ada Lum in songs and dances. The added attraction will be a series of classical dances by Kyra and a corps de ballet. These include Greek Egyptian, Hindu and Ease Indian.
Detroiter Abend-Post (Detroit, Michigan), April 1, 1917
 
 
Detroit Times (Michigan), April 2, 1917
Cadillac
Sam Levey’s own show, “The Charming Widows,” is back in the Cadillac this week brimful of new jokes, songs, dances and everything that goes to make a successful burlesque performance. Mr. Levey, who also is manager of the Cadillac, has changed the show completely from last season and the result is a finished product that gave excellent satisfaction at the initial performance Sunday afternoon. The welcome it received was indeed cordial.

Kyra, classical dancer, is without a doubt the biggest attraction offered. With the chorus she interpreted a number of exceedingly difficult Egyptian, Greek and Hindu steps. Particularly artistic is the Hindu “snake dance” in which Kyra proves her extreme litheness and agility.

The bulk of the comedy falls to Eddie Dale and Sam Carlton with capable assistance from Jimmie Cooper and Harry peterson. It is Dale, however, who brings out the most fun.

The big surprise of the show is Helen Stanley “the doll girl” who captures popular favor. Miss Stanley doesn’t look a day older than 16, and if it were not for the way she dresses one would imagine that she was a girl in her early teens. Long, golden curls, youthful, laughing eyes and a voice that is not yet mature all point to the fact that her years are not far advanced. The audience was sincere in its admiration of her, and applauded fervently at her every appearance.

Ada Lum has personal charm and that, coupled with a voice of splendid qualities, gains her a cordial reception. Connie Lehr Fuller and Mae Cameron are pleasing. The latter sings several songs in Belle Baker fashion, which prove very entertaining.
Echo de l’Ouest (Minneapolis, Minnesota), April 27, 1917
Au Gayety
Les dernières chansons populaires ainsi que des mélodies écrites spécialement pour la troupe “The Charming Widows” seront rendues au Gayety la semaine prochaine. C’est essentiellement une représentation de chant et de danse. Des riches costumes seront portés par les actrices qui composent 75 pour cent de la troupe. Ces costumes ne sont pas du genre ordinaire et un très grand nombre sont merveilleux. La troupe des “Charming Widows” compte des acteurs de renom tel que Eddie Dale, comédien allemand Sam Carlton, comédien juif Jimmie Cooper, Connie Faller, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum et Mae Cameron et un chœur de 20 jeunes filles.
New York Dramatic Mirror, May 5, 1917
Milwaukee
Eddie Dale, with “The Charming Widows,” at the Gayety, is on the boards. Kyra, who has won a local reputation for her dancing, is on the program also and is the cause on many capacity houses. Jimmie Cooper, Helen Stanley, Ada Lum, and Connie Fuller are in the cast.
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), June 13, 1917
Chinese Prima Donna
No more charming prima donna has ever graced the Lyric stage than Miss Ada Lum, the daughter of a prominent Chinese physician, in New Orleans. Her mother was Mae de Boer, who before her marriage conducted a fashionable seminary in the same city.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), June 24, 1917
Specialties Mark Star’s Burlesque Bill for Week.
“The High Rollers,” stock burlesque organization from Detroit, is at the Star this week with a show that ought to be a good one. The troupe, or part of it, has been here before this season, and it is up to the most exacting of burlesque standards. This time, too, there have been added a number of first class vaudeville specialties. First of these is the dancing act offered by M. Welly and Mlle. Melissa, which comes with the best of notices. Another will be the Hordes, a Russian team, with a musical novelty which has been liked well elsewhere.

Al Franks, Jewish comedian, still heads the cast, and he has capable support in John O. Grant, Harry Peterson and Earl Hall. Renee [sic] Vivienne, who played Cleveland two weeks since, will return, but Ada Lum and Mae Cameron have given place to Mabel Clarke and Dolly Morissey, both of whom are well known to burlesque movers. Connie Fuller, who is really very attractive, has a grotesque Bowery part which promises to be as funny as her makeup.
Detroit Times (Detroit, Michigan), August 11, 1917
 

 
Cadillac.
The “Charming Widows” a burlesque production owned by Detroiters will come to the Cadillac theater Sunday afternoon, for a week’s engagement. The show is new throughout and is said to be mounted with pretty costumes and attractive scenery. The company is headed by Eddie Dale, well-known to local theater-goers and other members of the company are Sam Carlton, Harry peterson, Earl Hall, Ada Lum, Rena Vivienne, Connie Fuller, Bobby Roberts and a chorus of 20 girls. Two new burlettas, “The Candy Shop,” and “At the Spring,” will be offered. New singing and dancing numbers feature the entertainment. Kyra, classical dancer, in a series of dances of an oriental flavor, will be a special number.
Wheeling Intelligencer (West Virginia), September 13, 1917

 
Wheeling Intelligencer (West Virginia), September 14, 1917
 

 
Wheeling Intelligencer (West Virginia), September 18, 1917

 
Wheeling Intelligencer (West Virginia), September 19, 1917

 
The Ohio Architect, Engineer and Builder, September 25, 1917
Empire
“The Charming Widows,” with Kyra, exotic dancer, is to play the Empire this week. It is a new production in everything but name. Eddie Dale heads the cast and directs the play, which consists of three brief farces. Others in the company, whose names are agreeably familiar, are Ada Lum, Connie Fuller, Rena Vivienne, prima donna, and Bobby Roberts. “The Charming Widows” is the Empire’s own show.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 23, 1917
Best Burlesque at Grand
Featuring Kyra in a series of classic danes, Eddie Dale, the clever comedian with any show this season, “The Charming Widows” yesterday afternoon and evening at the Grand Theatre proved the best attraction of the season. The production possesses more originality and funny situations than any of the previous shows and the chorus is not alone attractive, but is possessed of a number of girls who have good singing voices.

Kyra appears in four numbers in which she is assisted by a ballet. The assistance given by the ballet is nil, but Kyra’s dancing met with approval of the audiences, particularly the first number called, “The Dance of Spring.” Another, “The Festival,” was also enjoyed and the other two solo numbers gained appreciation.

Capable support is given Eddie Dale and Ada Lum, a prima donna who is a favorite with local audiences. Rena Vivienne, Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Connie Fuller, Earl Hall and Gussie White, the last named bring one of the company’s really capable performers. Miss White has a good voice and she is a capable dancer, leading several effective numbers.

The scenic investiture of the show is above the average and the costumes worn by the chorus are modish. Incidentally it is a good looking chorus that “The Charming Widows” management provides and also much in evidence.

The show will be given for the balance of the week with daily matinees.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 24, 1917
Kyra’s Dances Hit at Grand Theatre
Looked upon as the best extravaganza of the current season at the Grand Theatre, “The Charming Widows” show is this week drawing large audiences. Original and strikingly humorous situations abound throughout the piece and the witty lines are given humorous interpretation by a large cast of comedians, headed by the capable Eddie Dale.

In addition to a clever show, Kyra, the Egyptian dancer, performs a series of classic numbers which are gaining the appreciation of audiences. Her program is varied throughout the week and after today will be re-arranged. “Spirit of Spring” and “Valse Classique” are two of her best dances. her act is well staged and she has the assistance of a ballet in interpreting her numbers.

The chorus of girls is actually a talented one and numbers among it some extremely attractive young misses. They appear in more than a score of tuneful numbers and put over the songs with vim and snap.

Excellent support is given Eddie Dale by a large cast of principals. Ada Lum, a favorite with local audiences; Rena Vivienne, Sam Carlton, Harry Peterson, Connie Fuller, Earl Hall and Gussie White are among the cast. …
Baltimore American (Maryland), October 30, 1917
Charming Widows—Gayety
The Palace of Sweets and At the Springs are the titles of the burlesque entertainments that are presented by the Charming Widows at the Gayety Theater this week. The entertainment is considered one of the best that the Columbia Amusement Company has on this wheel, and those who are looking for a real burlesque entertainment as it should be should not fail to visit the Gayety Theater this week.

Eddie Dale heads the list of fun-makers. He is genuinely funny and the legitimate exponent of refined comedy. In addition to the regular bill, Kyra, claiming to be the most beautiful exponent of motion, does a number of startling dances that cannot fail to gain recognition for her.

Ada Lum, the beautiful Chinese-American, leads the feminine contingent, and there are also in the cast Meyer Harris, Rena Vivienne, Harry Peterson, Connie Lehr, Earl Hall and Gussie White. The production is well staged, the costumes new and handsome and the chorus, which is a large one, is composed of pretty girls who can sing and dance.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), November 6, 1917
Charming Widows—Gayety
There is not a dull moment in the show offered this week at the Gayety by the Charming Widows. They present two lively burlettas called the “Palace of Sweets” and “At the Spring.” Plenty of comedy is furnished by Eddie Dale, Myer Harris and Ada Lum. Kyra and her Dancing Girls added greatly to the artistic end of the performance.

No expense has been spared to stage the show along up-to-date lines.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), November 10, 1917
Copernicus once said: “There’s nothing new under the sun.” This, however, has been disproved by the producer of “Charming Widows,” for the attraction this season is so lavishly equipped with novelties that it is an almost impossible task to itemize all the original and enchanting surprises which await the patrons of the Majestic Theatre, where the clever organization of merrymakers will entertain next week.

Ada Lum, the captivating Chinese-American entertainer, has the stellar honors among the feminine contingent of the offering. There is also Meyer Harris, Harry Peterson, Rena Vivienne, Earl Hall, Gussie White and quite a number of others who take places in the foreground of the funfest.

Kyra, the beautiful poem of motion, will appear in an entire new spectacle, having the assistance of her corps de ballet in her many sensational dances for which special settings have been provided.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), November 12, 1917

 
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), November 15, 1917

 
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), November 16, 1917
Majestic
Two days remain for Wilkes-Barre theatergoers to avail themselves of the opportunity of witnessing the burlesque sensation, “The Charming Widows” at the Majestic theatre. The “Widows” terminate their local engagement to-morrow night. The show is full of pep from start to finish and many surprises are introduced. The cast in an excellent one, being headed by that sterling comedian, Eddie Dale, and the Chinese nightingale, Ada Lum. Kyra, a classic dancer of unusual ability, proves the sensation of the show in a series of artistic dances. As a scenic production, the play borders on the spectacular. The chorus is made up of about twenty very pretty girls, who excel at dancing. It is undoubtedly the best chorus seen at the Majestic this season. Clean cut comedy and tuneful melodies run throughout the entire action. It is a burlesque par excellence and is worthy of the consideration of all who enjoy this type of amusement.
Variety, December 1917?
 
 
New York Clipper, December 5, 1917
Sam Levey Has Show That Should Get the Money
Sam Levey’s “Charming Widows,” at the Star last week, was as good an entertainment as has been seen at the old Jay street house in several weeks.

With plenty of comedy in the many bits and scenes, a good cast of principals, a pretty, shapely lot of well-gowned chorus girls, nicely arranged numbers, catchy music and pretty scenery, it is a good show, and above all it has a feature in Kyra that is alone worth more than the price paid for the entire show. She is a artist of rare ability.

Eddie Dale and Meyer Harris share the comedy honors, Dale doing “Dutch,” while Harris portrays a Potash and Perlmutter character, which he handles very welL H e works easily and gets much fun out of his lines. He also assists greatly in working up the numbers. He and Dale work well together.

Harry Peterson is one of those talkative straights who works up his every situation with the comedians in clever style. He has a fine voice for both talking and singing, and puts over his numbers with a “punch.” He dresses well and is a corking good straight. In fact, he is one of the best on the circuit.

Earl Hall is another “straight,” but hasn’t much to do. What he does he takes care of nicely, several character bits proving his ability.

Connie Fuller is in three or four scenes in which she proves herself a very valuable woman. She works well with the comedians, assisting greatly in humoring the funny situations.

Ada Lum plays the leads and has a number of funny scenes.

Gussie White is the soubrette, but hasn’t very much to do. She wears some pretty dresses, puts plenty of ginger into her numbers and makes herself generally useful. … [Gussie and Ada would later team up]
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), December 15, 1917

 
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), December 20, 1917
“The Charming Widows”
“The Charming Widows” is the current attraction at the Gilmore theater, where it is pleasing the patrons of that house, the engagement continuing through the rest of the week. A fashionable candy shop serves as the locale for the exploitation of the humor in the first act, while the theme for the second one has been taken from the lively scenes encountered at health springs. The author has been successful in contracting a skit that amuses. Eddie Dale heads the cast. This comedian is likewise responsible for the staging of the production. Ada Lum, Meyer Harris, explorers of Hebrew comedy; Rena Vivienne, prima donna; Harry Peterson, Connie Lehr Fuller, soubrette; Earl Hall and Gussie White are a few of the many prominent entertainers.
Variety, December 1917? January 1918?
Charming Widows
… Ada Lum is billed as the American Chinese comedienne, but she doesn’t look Chinky by a jugful. A very good looker of brunet type, tall but well formed. She is given very little in the vocal division, but she is quite valuable to the outfit, nevertheless. …
Evening World (New York, New York), January 5, 1918
“Charming Widows” Come to the Olympic
“The Charming Widows” will be the attraction at the Olympic Theatre. The first part of the performance takes place in a fashionable candy shop. In the company are Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, Meyer Harris, Rena Vivienne, Harry Peterson, Connie Lehr Fuller, Earl Hall and Gussie White.

 
Evening World (New York, New York), January 8, 1918
“Charming Widows,” with Chinese Prima Donna, Olympic Hit
The “Charming Widows,” with charming Ada Lum, the only Chinese-American prima donna on the burlesque stage, and winner of a newspaper popularity contest, playing the leading female part, and Eddie Dale playing the principal funmaking part, came to the Olympic Theatre on East 14th Street last night for one week’s stay.

Dale plays the part of a German out for fun at any price, and with the help of Meyer Harris and Harry Peterson had all his wishes gratified.

Miss Lum has most of the singing numbers and won much applause from the large audience. Others who take over some of the singing and dancing were Miss Gussie White, Connie Lehr Fuller, Rena Vivienne, Karl Hall and a large chorus of beauties.
Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), January 13, 1918

 
Burlesque Bills
Trocadero—Undoubtedly one of the greatest dancing treats in the city this week will be that of Princess Pertina, who will present the latest in tho classical dance sensations. She will appear in conjunction with “The Charming Widows” company, who, it is said, have abandoned the down-trodden path of burlesque and turned towards the lanes of elaborate musical comedy. While the plot offers unlimited opportunities for grotesque and eccentric, comedy, inferior methods find no place in the performance. The first act portrays life in a fashionable candy shop, while the second shifts to a health resort. A hilarious Halloween festival furnishes the climax for the second act. Of course there are a great many specialties introduced during the action of the piece. Eddie Dale, a refined comedian, heads the cast, and others include Ada Lum, a fascinating and statuesque exponent of refreshing humor; Rena Vivienne, Meyer Harris, Harry Peterson, Connie Lehr Fuller, Earl Hall, Gussie White and others. The musical score is refreshingly pretty and full of animation and affords ample opportunities for the winsome chorus to do its full share in the entertainment of audiences. The stage settings and costumes are in harmony with the brilliancy of the production.
Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), January 15, 1918
“Charming Widows” at Trocadero
The Charming Widows were introduced to patrons of the Trocadero yesterday afternoon in two one-act burlettas, entitled “Palace of Sweets” and “At the Spring,” productions built around Eddie Dale, principal comedian, who was supported by a capable company of artists and a competent chorus. Toe rising of the first curtain revealed the interior of a fashionable candy shop, filled with salesladies, waitresses and patrons, surely a goodly assemblage to look upon. Creditable indeed were the various solos, duets and choruses introduced during the act, but especially notable was the work of Miss Ada Lum, Harry Peterson and Mr. Dale, who, by the way, is responsible for the staging of the production. The second act was laid “somewhere around French Lick, Ind.” and here Miss Gussie White, soubrette, easily took first honors in her rendition of “Dancing down in Dixie,” with the capable support of the chorus, whose costumes in this number were refreshingly clean and neat. As a special attraction, Princess Pertina was featured in classical dances. Occupying a decidedly hard position on the bill, she held the capacity audience until the closing curtain.
New York Clipper, January 16, 1918
Ada Lum Wins Contest
The honor of being the most popular woman in show business goes to Ada Lum with “The Charming Widows.” Miss Lum last week won the capital prize in a contest run by a local paper.

This is the first time the capital prize has been won by a burlesque woman, although other prizes in the past were won by Babe La Tour, Vera George and Irene Meara.
Variety, January 25, 1918
“The Charming Widows,” are a good looking bunch, remarkable for their sizing up in principals and chorus alike, noticable [sic] at the finale of both acts, where they do a sort of lock step. Gussie White, soubret, is the smallest girl on the stage and there is one chorus girl a trifle larger. The rest are all tall, like the principals. Ada Lum wore some good looking frocks, including an orange velvet and silver lace skirt, silver lace hat and blue bodice. She walked through the show with such perfect nonchalance one wondered whether she was being paid for her name or ability. …
Binghamton Press (New York), January 26, 1918
Armory Theater.
“Charming Widows,” Monday.
Those who are fond of orderly, refreshing and fashionable comedy and are also lovers of enchanting strains, will do well to wend their way towards the Armory Theater where the “Charming Widows” will be Monday, matinee and night. Never before has such an extravaganza been displayed in the construction of a burlesque offering and the popularity which this particular organization has achieved on its former visits should be increased with its effusion of merriment and melody. The cast is headed by Eddie Dale, the bright genius in the land of hillarity [sic], and Ada Lum, the stunning Chinese-American. A bargain matinee will be given and the prices are: 10¢, 20¢, 2S¢ and 50¢; evening, 10¢, 20¢, 30¢ and

75¢.—Advertisement.


 
Oswego Palladium (New York), January 29, 1918
 

The Charming Widows
A treat of unusual beauty and jollity is in store for the patrons of Richardson Theatre when paying a visit to the Charming Widows Thursday. This particular organization has always been in the lead of this style of amusement, but this season its producer has made special efforts to create the most elaborate offering in the realm of extravaganza and it may be claimed, without fearing contradiction, that no greater fun jubilee has ever graced the burlesque stage than the hilarious conglomeration of farce, melody and vaudeville which make up the program of the Widows. The cast is a most capable one and is headed by Edie Dale, the premier of refined character comedians, and Ada Lum, the captivating Chinese-American leader of fashionable extravaganza.
New York Clipper, January 31, 1918
 

New York Dramatic Mirror, February 2, 1918
Scranton, Pa.
… Majestic: “The Charming Widows” Burlesque company, work Jan. 21 (except 21), to excellent business. …
Buffalo Courier (New York), February 3, 1918
Garden—“Charming Widows”
Overloaded with a brilliant array of specialties, comedy scense [sic], hypnotizing strains, elaborate settings and exquisite costumes, but above all most lavishly supplied with the most powerful ensemble of mirth provokers that ever strolled through the avenues of extravagance, the “Charming Widows” will make their bow again at the Garden theater this week.

The name of the attraction is a guarantee for the best that can be had in the form of a light and breezy entertainment, for at no time have the “Charming Widows” failed to win a first place in the chain of productions of this particular style of amusement.

The vehicle is not only new in its entirety, but the plot is so well chosen, that the author was inspired to inject so much genuine hilarity into the scenes, that laughters are created almost at the rate of one each second. The melodies and lyrics are written to fi[ll] the various situations and particularly in this direction many novelties will be introduced, which will not only elicit admiration, but animation as well.

A number of bright specialties offer an excellent blending for the cluster of merriment emanating from the two gigantic acts, which have their locale in a fashionable candy shop and later on at some watering resort near French Lick, Ind.

Eddie Dale and Ada Lum will introduce themselves in a conversational skit. Meyer Harris and Earl Hall will entertain with parodies and witty layings and Rena Vievienne [sic], who starred in “Madam Butterfly” and “The Chocolate Soldier” will sing herself into the hearts of the auditors.

The bulk of the comedy in the musical oddity has been entrusted to Eddie Dale, considered to be the foremost character comedian in extravaganza. Dale also deserves credit for the staging of the new production and it has been stated, that in the present offering he has displayed the acme of efficiency in this particular direction. Sam Carlton, a most amusing impersonator of the Hebrew as one meets them daily in the Ghetto district is likewise almost in evidence with his antics; while Harry Peterson and Earl Hall support the principal comedians on a lavish scale.

Ada Lum, the captivating Chinese American stage star, leads the feminine contingent of the “Charming Widow.” Rena Vicienne [sic], the electrifying prima donna; Connie Lehr Fuller, the forte fortissimo soubrette and Gussie White, the dainty ingenue are a few of the other principal feminine mirth provokers.
Detroit Times (Michigan), February 23, 1918
For next week the Cadillac theater will offer “The Charming Widows,” a burlesque show under the direction of Detroit theatrical promoters. The show is new thruout and is mounted with pretty scenery , novel costumes and unique electrical effects. The company is head by Eddie Dale, character comedian, and Ada Lum, prima donna, and also includes Harry Peterson, Rene Vivienne, Connie Fuler, Earl Hall, Gussie White, Meyer Harris and a chorus of 25 pretty girls. The company will present two new burlettas, “The Palace of Sweets” and “At the Springs,” each being embellished by good singing and dancing numbers and vaudeville acts.

 
Detroiter Abend-Post (Detroit, Michigan), February 24, 1918


 
Detroit Times (Michigan), February 25, 1918
Cadillac
Followers of burlesque with a leaning towards the home product will find a made-in-Detroit show in “The Charming Widows” appearing this week in the Cadillac. Sam Levy, manager of the showhouse is owner of the company and he has succeeded in producing clever, well-balanced, hard-working and entertaining cast. Many local girls are in the company, for Levy believes Detroit has as much talent for the stage as any big city in the east or west.

In this particular show everybody seems to have worked hard to get together a well-blended melange of catch[y] songs, funny lines and jests and ludicrous situations, which to the person who must have his burlesque show weekly, makes an ideal show. The costuming and staging are good. Eddie Dale and Meyer Harris lead in the funmaking. Ada Lum a Detroit girl [She married in Detroit.] is one of the principals and is an excellent entertainer. Rene Vivienne, Gussie White and Conny [sic] Fuller are some of the leaders of the female contingent.
Echo de l’Ouest (Minneapolis, Minnesota), March 15, 1918
Au Gayety
Un vrai régal en fait de beauté et de gaieté sera offert la semaine prochaine aux habitués du Gayety, olors que les “Charming Widows” y tiendront l’affiche. Cette troupe a toujours été reconnue comme supérieure dans ce genre d’amusement mais on peut affirmer sans craidre d’être contredit que cette saison elle offre une représentation qui n’a jamais été égalée sur la scène du burlesque. Les farces, les numéros de vaudeville, la musique, tout est nouveau.

La troupe est des plus capables et comprend Eddie Dale, le chef des comdiens, Ada Lum, prima donna américaine, d’origine chinoise, sans mentionner d’autres étoiles qui font de cette troupe une organisation extraordinaire.

Les intrigues des comédies sont originales, les décors somptueux, les costumes riches et de la dernière mode, dont l’égal est rarement vu dans les attractions de premier ordre.
Duluth News-Tribune (Minnesota), March 28, 1918
Duluth’s Prima Donna Here Sunday, for Three Days
Rene Vivienne, Duluth’s own prima donna who last appeared here as the star both of “Madame Butterfly” and “The Chocolate Soldier,” will be in Duluth next Sunday, Monday and Tuesday as the prima donna of “The Charming Widows,” one of the greatest burlesque shows ever shown in Duluth.

In addition to Miss Vivienne, the cast is composed of such well known names as Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, Connie Fuller and Earl Hall and there is also Kyra, the beautiful poem of motion, who comes with a most elaborate program of four new dances for which special settings have been constructed, She will be supported by her own corps de ballet.

There will be special lea dies’ matinees on Monday and Tuesday when the many lady friends of Miss vivienne will have an opportunity to see and hear her again.
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), March 29, 1918

 
Duluth News-Tribune (Minnesota), March 30, 1918
 
 
Duluth Prima Donna Is with Charming Widows
Those who are fond of breezy, refreshing and fashionable comedy and are also lovers of enchanting strains, will do well to wend their way toward the Lyceum where the “Charming Widows” will entertain for three days starting Sunday matinee. never before has such an extravaganza been displayed in the construction of a burlesque offering and the popularity which this particular organization has achieved on its former visits will surely be increased with its latest effusion of incessant merriment and melody.
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), March 30, 1918
same advertisement as March 29

Duluth News-Tribune (Minnesota), March 31, 1918
Duluth Girl in Play Here
If the present success of the “Charming Widows” can be taken as a criterion, even standing room will be at a premium, when the new vintage of the “Widows” will be placed on display at Lyceum theater for three days starting today.

The production proper should play in the very high class theaters, for its entire make up displays more the characteristics of a Winter Garden show, than that of burlesque.

Eddie Dale, best known as Klutz, a character he made famous, will introduce himself in the new oddity as an inventor. His unsurpassed antics come even to greater advantage in the new vehicle than in any the popular comedian has used before. Ada Lum, the very pretty Chinese-American, will be his chief feminine support, while Meyer Harris, an excellent portrayer of the Hebrew race will be almost as much in evidence in the various fun scenes as the star comedian himself. Rene Vivienne, a prima donna of note, Connie Lehr Fuller, an exceptionally clever soubrette; Harry Peterson, the Al Joelson [sic] of extravaganza; Earl Hall, a dashing juvenile and Gussie White, the bewitching pretty doll girl will be among the chief merrymakers.

Kyra, the beautiful poem of motion, will disport herself in an entirely new conception of Egyptian, Grecian and East Indian dances. Four new scenes have been built for her spectacular offering. Her own costuming as well as that of her corps de ballet is claimed to be the most elaborate ever displayed in extravaganza.

The appearance here of “The Charming Widows” Sunday, Monday and Tuesday is of special interest to Duluthians as the prima donna role is sung by Rene Vivienne, a Duluth girl, who was last seen here as the star of “Madam Butterfly” and “The Chocolate Soldier.” There will be a special ladies’ matinee Monday and Tuesday.

Three days starting today matinee.

 
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), April 1, 1918

 
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), April 2, 1918

 
Reedy’s Mirror, April 12, 1918
Coming Shows
... His principal support will be Ada Lum, the very pretty Chinese-American prima donna.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 9, 1918
Empire
“The Charming Widows” are at the Empire next week with two farces with music called “In the Palace of Sweets” and “At the Springs.” They are built to be laughed at, and the cast, which includes Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, George Bartlett, Rene Vivienne, Harry Peterson, Connie Fuller, Earl Hale and Gussie White should make the laughs come out. There is a big chorus, too, and a mystery act, called “Elsie,” that the management brags about.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 11, 1918
Cadillac
… For the week of May 19 the Cadillac will present “The Maids of Detroit,” a lively burlesque show under the direction of Detroit theatrical promoters. Eddie Dale, character comedian, and Ada Lum, prima donna, head a company of capable singers, dancers and funmakers.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 14, 1918
“Charming Widows” Bring Home Play to Empire
It is “home week” at the Empire this week: for Sam Levey’s “Charming Widows” are holding forth there, with a deal of merriment and activity.

The offering, which is heralded as a “rip-roaring melange of mirth and melody,” is in tow acts and nine scenes. The tab is entitled “The Palace of Sweets.” The send part is “At the Springs.”

The production is well staged, well costumed, and well presented. Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, George Bartlett, Connie Fuller, Earl Hall and others add to the list of principals. The chorus is unusually well balanced, and puts over its numbers with real ambition. There is a deal of novelty at times—and it proves mighty entertaining.

One of the big numbers of the program is “La Bergere,” a plastic poser, who works in statuesque effect, assisted by tow posing dogs. Her act is really artistic, and meets with a big hand. Rene Vivienne, operatic soprano, introduces a series of solos which go big.

Another hit is made by the “Biff-Biff-Bang” trio, Fuller, Stevenson and Lester. Their novelty is most entertaining.

The Charming Widows offer pleasing burlesque. You’ll like it.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 16, 1918
The Cadillac theater next week will present “The Maids of Detroit,” a lively and handsomely mounted burlesque show under the direction of Detroit theatrical promoters. The production is new thruout and is regarded as one of the tip top shows on the American circuit. Eddie Dale, clever character comedian, and Ada Lum, prima donna, head a company of singers, dancers and funmakers, including Rena Vivienne, Connie Lehr Fuller, Harry peterson, Earl Hall, Gussie White and many others. Two new musical farces with good vaudeville acts interpolated will be offered. There will also be a novelty number provided by “Elsie.”
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 20, 1918
Cadillac
Sam Levy’s own show, “The Maids of Detroit,” came to the Cadillac theater for a week’s stay, Sunday afternoon. It was greeted by an enthusiastic clan of burlesque lovers. They were not disappointed, for the production is just filled with theatrical foodies. Eddie Dale, the volcanic comedian of Tim thumb size, captures the audience with his funny quips and quaint gestures and grimaces. George Bartlett pleases with his comedy, while Larry Larrivee makes a hit as an Irish character actor. He has a sweet voice, not wholly finished, but nevertheless possessing extraordinary tonal quality. Ada Lum, a Detroit product; Rena Vievenne [sic] and Connie Fuller are the feminine principals. All are clever, and Miss Vivienne has a very sweet and pleasing voice. Hall and Bartlett have a “gab” specialty of merit. “La Bergere,” one of the best plastic posing acts on the stage, is included in the olio. Three hunting dogs, magnificent creatures, are in the act. The chorus is pretty, of good voice, and shapely. Costumes, while not extremely lavish, are pretty nd of good quality.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 23, 1918
Star.
“The Avenue Girls,” Detroit burlesque organization, plays the Star next week for that playhouse’s closing attraction. It will be a big show and a lively one, richer than most in its string of vaudeville specialties. Chief of these is the turn of ten Arab acrobats, the George Hamid troupe. Their number includes pretty much every variety of acrobatics and tumbling, and there are dancers, contortionists, balancers and strong men, too. Ada Lum is the featured player in the two-act farce with music.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 25, 1918
Cadillac
… For the week of June 2 Manager Sam Levey of the Cadillac announces the “Dreamland Burlesquers,” with Eddie Dale, Larry Larrivee, George Bartlett, Harry Peterson, Earl Hall, Ada Lum, Frances Detray, Helen Stanley, Rena Vivienne and a big chorus of girls.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 1, 1918
Cadillac
The Cadillac theater next week will present “The Dreamland Burlesquers,” a new show under the direction of Sam Levey, the Detroit theatrical promoter. The engagement begins with a performance Sunday afternoon and there will be a matinee daily. Eddie Dale and George Bartlett are the principal funmakers and they are supported by a capable aggregation of singers, dancers and funmakers. Larry Larrivee, Irish comedian; Ada LUm, prima donna; Rena Vivienne, comedienne; Frances Detray, soubrette; Helen Stanley, ingenue; Earl Hall, and Harry Peterson are other members of the cast. There is also a chorus of 20 pretty girls who will display a variety of pretty gowns. Sixteen new song an dance numbers will be introduced. Vaudeville specialties will be contributed by Eddie Dale, in a new monologue; Harry peterson, in new songs; Frances Detray in songs in dances, and other members of the company. Zira, a classical dancer, will be the added attraction.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 8, 1918
 
 
“The Innocent Maids” will come to the Cadillac theater Sunday afternoon to begin an engagement of one week. The organization is composed of many players who are favorites with local theatergoers and the show is new thruout. It is adequately mounted with pretty costumes, striking scenic effects and novel electrical lighting. Two snappy farces will be presented and these are said to be rapid in action and replete with good comedy situations. Eddie Dale, a clever character comedian, has the leading role and is supported by a capable aggregation of singers, dancers and funmakers. These include George Bartlett, Hebrew comedian; Larry Larrivee, Irish comedian; Harry Peterson, straight man; Ada Lum, prima donna; Helen Stanley, ingenue; Frances Detray, soubrette; Earl Hall, eccentric comedian, and  chorus of 20 pretty girls. Sixteen new singing and dancing numbers as well as a variety of good vaudeville specialties will be introduced. In one of the song numbers the chorus girls are given opportunities for individual specialties.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 10, 1918
Cadillac
Plenty of comedy distinguishes the burlesque stock offering in the Cadillac theater this week. Sunday audiences felt refreshed and aroused from a state of passive attention when George Bartlett scampered around in the make-up of a forlorn Hebrew. Harry Peterson was good as a “straight” man. Larry Larrivee and Earl Hall add further fun. Hall appears as a “rube” and scores. Rena Vivienne, Ada Lum and Helen Stanley, sing and dance with vigor and pop. Miss Stanley, perhaps the most diminutive burlesque “regular” Detroit has ever had, is fast becoming most popular. The chorus does adequate work.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 15, 1918
Cadillac
Manager Sam Levey of the Cadillac theater promises another good summer show for next week. The “High Rollers” will provide entertainment which will be a merry mixture of burlesque, musical comedy and vaudeville, the production being handsomely mounted with new scenery and novel costumes. George Bartlett, Hebrew comedian, is the chief fun maker and he is ably assisted by Larry Larrivee, Irish comedian; Ada Lum, prima donna; Rena Vivienne, comedienne; Helen Stanley, ingenue; Frances Detray, soubrette, and a chorus of 20 pretty and gingery girls. Sixteen new musical numbers will be introduced by the principals and chorus. Two new burlettas, “Up in an Airplane” and “Seeing the Town,” will be featured. There will also be vaudeville acts by Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Frances Detray, Ada Lum and other members of the company. 

 
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 17, 1918
Cadillac
The Cadillac theater burlesquers, this week billed under the name of “The High Rollers,” succeeded in instilling a little cheer in the hearts of a perspiring gallant few who decided to brave the interior of the theater rather than take a boat of trolley ride. George Bartlett, Harry Peterson, Larry Larrivee and Earl Hall, held up the main comedy work, while Ada Lum, Rena Vivienne, Frances Detray and Helen Stanley looked pretty and sang well. The chorus was as good as usual. the show was in two parts, neither of much importance, but entirely heavy enough for a hot summer’s day. The costumes were adequate, as was the scenery.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), September 1, 1918
Lyceum—Many ingenious and unusual effects will be noted in the production of “The Beauty Revue,” the Bernstein musical farce which comes to the Lyceum Theater next week. Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, Harry Peterson, George Bartlett and Helen Gibson are some of the stars who will present the revue.
Washington Herald (Washington, DC), September 1, 1918
Lyceum—“Beauty Revue”
A strong cast of burlesque principals will be assembled at the Lyceum Theater next week for the annual “Beauty Revue,” which is one of the major shows featured by Rube Bernstein this season on the American burlesque wheel. Eddie Dale, dean of burlesque comedians; Ada Lum, Chinese prima donna; Harry Peterson, the fashion plate, and [G]eorge Bartlett, peer [sic] of Hebrew comedians, are some of the stars in next week’s show at the Avenue playhouse. …
Evening Star (Washington, DC), September 4, 1918
Lyceum—Burlesque presenting Rube Bernstein’s production, “The Beauty Revue,” featuring Ada Lum, who boasts of oriental and English ancestry, with Eddie Dale, comedian; George Bartlett, Helen Gibson, Harry Peterson and a chorus that will be seen in fourteen costume changes. Nat Osborne and Joe Young are responsible for the music of the show.
Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 5, 1918
Lyceum
Rube Bernstein’s stupendous burlesque production, “The Beauty Revue,” will be next week’s attraction at the Lyceum Theater, beginning with a matinee at 3 o’clock Sunday. A long list of well-known burlesque entertainers heads the cast of forty people.

Ada Lum, whose combined Oriental and English ancestry has made her somewhat of a sensation in burlesque, will be the featured star. Others in the cast include Eddie Dale, comedian, George Bartlett, Hebrew comic; Helen Gibson, the blond ingenue, and Harry Peterson, the fashion plate. Nat Osborne an Joe Young wrote the music for the show.

An exceptionally attractive group of girls make up the Bernstein beauty chorus.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), September 8, 1918
Lyceum
Rube Bernstein’s newest burlesque offering “The Beauty Revue,” will open a week’s engagement at the Lyceum Theater today at 3 p. m. It is a gay, girlish, musical show in two acts and nine scenes, attractively equipped with costumes and scenic effects.

The music and lyrics are by Jack Smith and Nat Osborne. The cast, a big one, is headed by Eddie Dale, comedian, and Ada Lum, prima donna. Others are Harry Peterson, George Bartlett and Helen Gibson. Twenty tuneful song numbers enliven the performances.

A chorus of thirty girls will be a rose-tinted elevated runway that projects over the audience.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), September 9, 1918
Lyceum
“The Beauty Revue” was presented at the Lyceum Theater yesterday, and met with instant approval. It is a burlesque frolic in two acts and six scenes, in which twenty-two musical numbers are rendered. “Stolen Sweets” is the name given to the piece for which Jack Smith and Nat Osborne composed the music. 
The cast headed by Eddie Dale and George Bartlette, with, Ada Lum, the Chinese prima donna, includes Helen Gibson, Ethel Bartlette and Harry Peterson.
Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 10, 1918
Lyceum
Rube Bernstein once more presents his Beauty Revue in a new burletta in two acts, “Stolen Sweets,” which attracted many people to the Lyceum Theater last night.

The cast was made up of such stars as Harry Peterson, Helen Gibson, Henry Guertin, Ethel Barlett, Ada Lum, and Eddie Dale.

That the audience enjoyed the show thoroughly was evident by the frequent outbursts of applause which rocked the house. Among the song numbers were “Back to the U. S. A.,” “Kattty, Katty,” and “Wee, Wee Maria.”
Moving Picture World, September 14, 1918
Fame’s a Fleet Bird of Passage
Quick now! Do a little fast thinking.
Did you ever hear of Ada Lum, or Y’vonne Shelton, or Vivienne Segal, or Monda Glendower?

No? Well, that’s peculiar.

They have just won, according to the Morning Telegraph, “The highest honors that can be accorded an actor or actress.” They ran second, third, fourth and fifth to Edmund Breese in a popularity contest.

The contest was open to both stage and screen and proving what a tremendous power the Telegraph is in the picture business its influence upon readers resulted in the five leaders being selected entirely from the stage.

Edmund Breesed in the winner by a large majority.

Ada, Yvonne, Vivienne and Monda have a foursome of pretty names, anyhow.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), September 14, 1918
Burlesque
Trocadero—Rube Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue,” the cast is headed by Eddie Dale and also includes Ada Lum, Helen Gibson, Henry Curtin, Harry Peterson, George Bartlett.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), September 17, 1918
“Beauty Revue”—Trocadero
Rube Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue,” one of the best burlesque features of the year, is at the Trocadero this week. Eddie Dale heads the strong cat of artists which also includes Ada Lum, Helen Gibson, Henry Curtin, Harry Peterson and George Bartlett. New novelties in the burlesque are featured in the bill which is one of the best that has been at the Trocadero this season.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), September 28, 1918
Musical Revue at Grand All Week
In order to provide Trenton theatregoers with a musical comedy production for Fair Week, Manager Waldron has booked “The Beauty Revue” for the Grand Theatre, and it will open a week’s engagement Monday afternoon and continue for the balance of the week, with a matinee every day.

“The Beauty Revue” is by Rube Bernstein, whose “Follies of Pleasure” show is gaining so much favor at the Grand this week.

“The Beauty Revue” is a hodgepodge of comedy in two acts and nine scenes. Its chief comedian is Eddie Dale, who is supported by Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Henry Gurtin, Ada Lum and Helen Gibson. Particular stress is laid on the new song numbers in “The Beauty Revue” written especially for this production by Jack Smith and Nat Osborne. Among those most prominent are “Venus on Broadway,” “Sinbad” and “Welcome to Our City.”
Trenton Times-Advertiser (New Jersey), September 29, 1918

 
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), September 30, 1918
 
 
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 1, 1918
 
 
“Beauty Revue” Is Snappy Show
Presenting a lively musical and girl show, which will continue throughout Fair week, Rube Bernstein’s newsiest attraction, “The Beauty Revue,” pleased audiences at the Grand Theatre yesterday, afternoon and evening.

Eddie Dale heads the principals, who embrace some of the best known comedians on the circuit. in the brief comedy roles, Dale provoked lots of laughter. Ada Lum as the prima donna presented a picture of attractiveness and added to the tone of the production with a pleasing singing voice.

Other principals include Helen Gibson and Harry Peterson, the latter prominently identified with the song numbers. Both shared in the success of the performance. A well drilled chorus of attractive birds is one of the features of the revue. Some of the song hits were “Getting Together,” “Venus on Broadway” and “Sinbad.”

A rose-tinted glass runway is another of the features. The entire company is seen on the electric runway in singing and dancing numbers. All music and lyrics were written especially for the revue by Jack Smith and Nat Osborne. Twenty tuneful song numbers, colorful costumes and snappy comedy all go to make up a fast show.

The same attraction will be repeated at the Grand twice daily during the balance of the week.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 2, 1918
“Beauty Revue” Liked at Grand
“The Beauty Revue” has been pleasing patrons of the Grand Theatre where it is the all week Trenton Fair attraction.

One of the features is rose-tinted elevated runway above the heads of the audiences. The chorus of attractive girls is seen on the runway in several song numbers and the novelty is pleasing large audiences.

There has been a large advance sale of seats for all performances and the management is expecting this to be one of the most successful weeks in the history of the house.

Eddie Dale, comedian; Ada Lum, prima donna;  Harry Peterson, George Bartlett and Helen Gibson, ingenue, head the big company. To support them there is a chorus that sets a new pace, while the scenic and sartorial environment provided for the the entire show in two acts and nine scenes is elaborate.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 3, 1918
“Beauty Revue” Draws at Grand
There has been a lively advance sale of seats for the last three days engagement of “The Beauty Revue” at the Grand Theatre, and interest seems to be high in this bright musical show.

To surpass last week’s “Follies of Pleasures” was not an easy task for the producer. But, again, Mr. Bernstein has put it over, and the “Beauty Revue” is considered superior to anything he has heretofore done.

Mr. Bernstein has answered the cry for something new in the book and lyrics he has provided for his newest production, and he also has introduced various elements for novelty in the staging of the many song numbers, which he directed personally. “Over the Top,” “Venus on Broadway” and the “Jazz Dance Rag” are a few of them. Nat Osborne and Joe Young wrote the music for “The Beauty Revue,” while special elaborate scenic environment has been provided.

An exceptionally attractive group of girls makes up the chorus and the fourteen sets of costumes used in the course of the performance are striking sartorial novelties.

Seldom has a stronger cast of principals been assembled for a like production than in “The Beauty Revue.” Eddie Dale, comedian; Ada Lum, prima donna; Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Helen Gibson, ingenue, are leaders of the cast.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 4, 1918
Tickets Selling for ‘Beauty’ Show
Seats have been much in demand for the final performance today and tomorrow at the Grand Theatre of “The Beauty Revue.”

A feature of the bright and snappy musical show is the large chorus of talented and attractive girls. Gowned in a stunning array of lavish sartorial novelties, the ensembles are made doubly attractive on the elevated runway extending above the heads of the audience.

“The Beauty Revue” is a hodgepodge affair in two acts of eight scenes. A big cast of entertainers is headed by Eddie Dale, one of the best known comedians on the circuit. Ada Lum is the prima donna. Jessie Bartlett adds to the singing portion of the revue. Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Helen Gibson and others make up the list of principals.

Among the most popular musical hits to be heard with the revue are: “The Domino Girl,” “Venus on Broadway” and “Hello, America.”
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), October 5, 1918
“Beauty Revue” ends at Grand
Final performances will be given this afternoon and tonight of Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue,” which will close a successful week’s engagement at the Grand Theatre. The revue, which had a sixteen weeks’ run at the Olympia Theatre, New York, is somewhat different from the usual girl and music show. It makes no pretense of having a plot. It is simply a succession of high-class vaudeville specialties presented in some eight or nine scenes.

The songs were written by Nat Osborne and the entire production was staged under personal supervision of Mr. Bernstein. The cast includes Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Henry Gurtin, Helen Gibson and many others of equal prominence. There is a chorus of 20 girls on the glass runway.
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), October 8, 1918
Empire Theatre, Hoboken
Patrons of that which is good in burlesque have a treat this week at the Empire in Rube Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue,” staged in two acts and nine scenes. Ever since Mr. Bernstein’s entry into the field of burlesque producers a few seasons ago his efforts have been marked by a distinctive individuality. He is now known as the Ziegfeld of Burlesque, and the mere announcement that he is sponsor for an attraction is guarantee of the worth of the show.

Mr. Bernstein provided the book and lyrics for his “Beauty Revue,” while the music was composed by Nat Osborne and Joe Young. Particularly elaborate, bizarre and unusual is the scene environment from the Walter Smith studios.

Eddie Dale, a very funny comedian, and Ada Lum, prima donna, head the company, while other principals include Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, original Hebrew comedian; Henry Gurtin, acrobatic comedian, and Helen Gibson, an engaging blonde ingenue.“Over the Top,” “Venus on Broadway,” “Jazz Dance Rag” and other original song numbers are features, many of them being staged on an elevated electric runway.
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), October 10, 1918
“Beauty Revue,” Hit at the Empire
Rube Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue,” one of the newsiest things in burlesque, is making good at the Empire, Hoboken, this week. This lively show demands the services of an unusually large array of entertainers. The principal personages of the cast are Eddie Dale, Harry Peterson and beautiful Ada Lum. A chorus of twenty-four girls appear in a series of smart gowns. “The Beauty Revue” is sponsored by Rube Bernstein, one of the youngest and ablest producers in the burlesque field to-day. The dance ensembles and groupings and the art of Mr. Bernstein are exemplified in scenes of lavish color treatment. The book tells a clever story brimful of laughs while the action and progress of the plot evolve with climaxes of musical and dramatic intensity.
Evening World (New York, New York), October 19, 1918


 
“The Beauty Revue” Olympic’s Attraction
Rube Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue” will be the attraction at the Olympic Theatre. The performances consists of two burlesques, with vaudeville specialties. In the company are Ada Lum, Eddie Dale and Harry Peterson.
Variety, October 25, 1918
Beauty Revue
There is a remarkable difference between this attraction and that called the “Follies of Pleasure,” which was the show at the Olympic last week. It is hard to believe that both shows are under the same management. But they are and the name of Rube Bernstein adorns both of them. But where the “Follies” leans to the dirt, this one is quite the opposite and leans principally to ensemble numbers to get over with the audience, and is does do that.

Bernstein has spread himself regardless on the costuming of the production. There are ten changes for the chorus of 16, and all of the costumes look nifty. The principals also hold up in the clothes division, and the gowns that two of the leading women wear are in exceeding good taste.

The show itself is a fast-moving burlesque entertainment that goes right along with numbers coming fast and getting over. The chorus is well trained and their work has a unison that is marked, for shows of this type. None of that individual starring by the members of the ensemble, and the result is that the numbers get more than their share of the applause. …

It is in the woman division, however, that the show is strongest. Ada Lum and Helen Gibson stand out like a house afire for looks and work. The former is a striking brunet, and wears the six gowns that she showed to perfection, while the latter, a blonde of a decided type, was just as striking from a sartorial standpoint in a quartet of creations. Both displayed considerable form in full-length tights in the finale of the last act. …

Several spots were given over to specialties, Miss Gibson and Henry Guertin getting a strong handing just before the close of the first act, and the Dale and Lum specialty in the second act was well worked up with comedy. …

The Beauty Revue” at the Olympic this week is a re-hash of “The charming widows” of last season. The chorus make a rugged background for three good looking women principals. An auburn haired end girl is the prettiest and both end girls deserve special mention on their vivacity. Ada Lum is quite as coldly tolerant of her surroundings as before—only putting interest in the purported “specialty” she does with Eddie Dean. …

A purple velvet drapery embroidered in brilliant design over shaded chiffon and a smart purple turban, worn at opening was about the most attractive outfit Miss Lum wore. Some of her gowns were made over from last year, and had too much trimming. For instance, for her specialty she was in a turquoise blue georgette foundation with pink velvet ribbon appliquéd in Roman border design, gold finishing the lower edge. Two strips of accordion plaited orange chiffon fell down back. An overskirt of nile green georgette with gold lace insertings, outlined with the pink velvet ribbon, had five-inch border ar bottom of white fur. Two shades of green feather topped a small mushroom hat of turquoise georgette. Some combination!
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), November 1, 1918
Bernstein Show at Plaza
Rube Bernstein’s company presenting “Follies of Pleasure” is the attraction for the reopening of the Plaza theater after the shutdown of a month or so, and large audiences witnessed the opening performances yesterday, the show winning much applause. Among the principals who appeared to most hit the fancy of the audience were Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, Harry Peterson and Helen Gibson. Several of the comedians succeeded in raising laughter. The engagement is for three days.
Billboard, November 2, 1918
American Burlesque Assn.
Attraction at the Olympic Theater, New York City, Week of October 21, 1918
Rube Bernstein’s Beauty Revue
review
… Ada Lum, a dark-haired, stately prima donna, has a most bewitching smile ability to sing, dance a few steps, read lines, work in scenes and wear stunning gowns. In her regimental draft numbers her appearance in white fleshings would have delighted the artistic eye of the sculptor. …
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), November 10, 1918
 
 
The Beauty Revue Burlesquers will appear at the Howard Athenaeum beginning with the Monday matinee in “Stolen Sweets.” Eddie Dale will be the principal comedian. Ada Lum, who won an automobile in a popularity contest, has the part of Verna Smiles. Harry Peterson is another favorite. There will be a big vaudeville program. Concert every Sunday night.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), December 3, 1918
Gayety—Burlesque in all that the name implies—and of good quality at that—is to be found at the Gayety. Everybody present yesterday had a good time and laughed uproariously at the antics of the comedians and applauded the numerous pretty girls in their stunning costumes. The show deserves its title, “The Beauty Revue.” Eddie Dale, Ada Lum, Harry Peterson, George Bartlett and Helen Gibson were among those who contributed individually and collectively to the success of the offering.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), December 19, 1918



Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), December 20, 1918
At the Nesbitt
Beauty Revue
Replete with clever vaudeville specialties and scintillating with catchy tunes, Rube Bernstein’s Beauty Revue still holds the boards at the Nesbitt. The Beauty Revue is a series of colorful scenes that blend with mirth, melody and feminine beauty to a nicety. The cast is headed by Ada Lum, the prima donna, and embraces a number of other well-known burlesque favorites including: Eddie Dale and Harry Peterson. The production boasts of one of the most dazzling beauty choruses on the American Burlesque Circuit and has every other essential that makes for success in the girl and music show. the engagement closes tomorrow night.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), January 2, 1919
Hudson.
Rube Bernstein’s “Beauty Revue” with Eddie Dale, and Ada Lum, which opened at the Hudson theater yesterday afternoon, proved to be a fitting holiday attraction. The show, which is a new one, contains many novelties that bring it out of the ordinary burlesque type. Eddie Dale, the principal comedian, is well known here and returns with a new line of comedy that is successful. Ada Lum, also a Schenectady favorite, duplicated her success of former seasons. Helen Gibson is a lively ingenue, while Florence Whitford, soubrette, ranks with the rest of the cast. Harry Peterson the straight man. can sing and Henry Guertin handles the second comedy role to perfection. Two burlesque pieces are presented. One of the features of the show is the golden runway, a platform extending the entire depth of the orchestra, upon which the members of the cast and the chorus, work several numbers. The comedy is clean and new, while the musical numbers contain the season’s latest hits. The show will be seen for the remainder of the week with dally matinees.
Watertown Daily Times (New York), January 4, 1919

 
Watertown Daily Times (New York), January 6, 1919
Rube Bernstein’s Beauty Revue.
Of the many notable burlesque productions which Rube Bernstein has brought to Watertown, The Beauty Revue which comes to the City opera house Tuesday and Wednesday following its four months run at the Olympic theatre, New York city is promised to be his best and most brilliant stage achievement. The Beauty Revue is a banquet of song and a feast of jollity in two acts and eight scenes. The cast is headed by Eddie Dale, one of Burlesque’s best comedians who is assisted by beautiful Ada Lum, Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Helen Gibson and a dozen others of equal importance. A chorus of stunning young women selected for their distinct types of American and European beauty and an illuminated elevated runway are the features of this musical revue.

 
Watertown Daily Times (New York), January 7, 1919
City Opera House advertisement
Watertown Daily Times (New York), January 8, 1919

 
Detroit Times (Michigan), January 25, 1919
Coming Attractions
“The Beauty Revue,” one of burlesque’s newest offerings, a production owned by Sam E. Levey, manager of the Cadillac theater, will be the Cadillac’s attraction for a week beginning Sunday, Feb. 2. The cast is headed by Eddie Dale, an ingenious comedian, and numbered among the principals are Ada Lum, Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Henry Gurtin and Helen Gibson. The production has been staged in a pretentious manner. “The Beauty Revue” boasts a chorus of beauties gifted with exceptional singing and dancing ability.
Detroit Times (Michigan), January 31, 1919
Cadillac—“Detroit’s Own Show,” presenting a chorus of handsome girls and an array of burlesque principals, several of whom are from Detroit, will be the Cadillac theater’s offering next week, beginning with Sunday’s matinee. It is “The Beauty Revue,” Manager owned by Sam Levey, of the Cadillac theater, and one of the most elaborate productions now touring the burlesque circuit. The chorus is an outstanding feature of “The Beauty Revue” and the members of this singing and dancing aggregation were personally selected by Manager Levey, who has combined two burlesque companies into the one now being presented in “The Beauty Revue.”

Eddie Dale, the featured funster, will bring a new budget of songs, dances and comedy. Along with him will be Ada Lum, a charming vocalist gifted with an appealing personality; Helen Gibson, a delightful ingenue; Harry Peterson, “the fashion plate of burlesque;” Jessie Bartlett, a Jewish comedian of unique methods, and Henry Gurtin. Miss Bartlett is a specialist in syncopation and she will present ragtime melodies with new twists to them. “The Beauty Revue” will be offered in nine scenes, which have been set off scenically in a highly artistic manner. In its equipment of soloists and dancers the show is replete.
Detroit Times (Michigan), February 1, 1919


 
Cadillac
For the coming week, beginning with the matinee performance tomorrow, the Cadillac theater will offer a burlesque attraction of far more than ordinary interest. It is “The Beauty Revue” or “Detroit’s Own Show,” as it is known here.

“The Beauty Revue” is owned by Manager Sam Levey, of the Cadillac theater, and in its cast of principals, headed by Eddie Dale and Ada Lum, and its chorus of beauties who are featured in song and dance specialties, it is not rivaled by any show new traversing the burlesque circuits. Dale for many years has been a favorite with the Detroit public and he is an eccentric little funster possessing originality. Miss Lum is a delightful vocalist who features many stunning gowns during the nine scenes of the two acts.

Other principals will be Harry Peterson, “the fashion plate of burlesque;” Helen Gibson, a vivacious ingenue of rare singing and dancing ability; George Bartlett, a Jewish comedian, and Henry Gurtin, an acrobatic funster. As a special added attraction Manager Levey will present several vaudeville specialties and novelties that are a distinct feature of “The Beauty Revue.” The performances possess no semblance of a plot. Every minute is given to song, dance and straight-from-the-shoulder fun.
New York Clipper, March 5, 1919

Ada Lum, whose picture is on the front cover this week, is prima donna of the “Beauty Revue,” and has the distinction of being the only performer in burlesque who has ever won the grand capital popularity prize in the Morning Telegraph contest. Miss Lum is of the distinctive type, with a fine personality and is slated for a production for next season. She is under the personal direction of Roehm and Richards.

Ada Lum Gets Divorce
Ada Lum, prima donna of the “Beauty Revue,” was granted a divorce from Frank Noonan in Detroit last week by Judge Mulheiser.
The Independent, March 22, 1919
The Century
In announcing the engagement of Rube Bernstein’s Beauty Revue at the Century commencing Saturday matinee the management of the Century makes public the following facts concerning the production. The Beauty Revue of which Rube Bernstein is author, proprietor and producer comes to this city endorsed by both press and public of the large cities. The Beauty Revue is a hodge-podge revue in two acts and nine scenes. It’s chief comedian is Eddie Dale—who is supported by such well-known burlesque stars as Harry Peterson, George Bartlett, Henry Gurtin, Ada Lum and Helen Gibson. Particular stress is laid upon the new song numbers in “The Beauty Revue” written especially for this production by Jack Smith and Nat Osborne. Among those most prominent are “Venus on Broadway,” “Sinbad” and “Welcome to Our City.” A garden of California beauties will be seen on the rose-tinted electric elevated runway.
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), April 27, 1919

 
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), April 30, 1919
 

 The Repository (Canton, Ohio), May 1, 1919

 
Alliance Review and Leader (Ohio), May 2, 1919
Beauty Revue advertisement
 The Repository (Canton, Ohio), May 3, 1919
same advertisement as April 30
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 7, 1919
Local Players Head Burlesque Stock at Empire
Comes announcement of the players who will participate in the opening week of summer burlesque, which will be inaugurated at the Empire theater May 26.

Mitty De Vere, a Cleveland product and a favorite with burlesque fans, will play the leading comedy. Ada Lum, another Cleveland product player and well known through experience here on tour and in stock, will sing the prima donna roles.

Jimmy Cooper, who plays straight parts, will stage the productions. Helen Stanley is the soubrette, and Morris Towlan, eccentric dancer, is one of the featured players. Charles Fleming, Bonnie Lloyd, Florence Whitford and Jack Mitchell complete the list of principals.

The burlesque players will alternate between here and Detroit, each company presenting its bill for a fortnight, one week in each city. It is said that burlesque will be departed from and musical revues offered, with ladies’ matinees featured.

Manager William Roche will continue in charge of the summer engagement.
Billboard, May 17, 1919
Cleveland Stock Cast
Cleveland, O., May 12.—Players will participate in the opening week of summer burlesque, which will be inaugurated at the Empire Theater May 26 include Mitty DeVere, who will play the leading comedy; Ada Lum, prima donna: Jimmy Cooper, straight (Mr. Cooper will also stage the productions); Helen Stanley, soubrette; Morris Towlan [sic], the eccentric dancer; Charles Fleming, Bonnie Lloyd, Florence Whitford and Jack Mitchell.

The burlesque players will alternate between here and Detroit, each company presenting its bill for a fortnight, one week in each city.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 17, 1919
Patrons of the Cadillac theater have a treat in store for them during the week of May 26, when Sam Levey’s own company of burlesque artists arrive. The show is called “The Charming Widows.” This is the de lice organization of the Cadillac circuit and one that always draws large crowds to the popular Michigan ave. playhouse. Ada Lum, a local girl with a host of friends, is a member of the company. Associated with her are Helen Stanley, that popular soubrette, and Florence Whitford. Among the male favorites are James Cooper, who will make his first appearance in two years in this city; Mitty De Vere, in his Irish interpretations; Manny Besser, one of the best Jewish comedians on the stage; Morris Towlan [sic], Dutch comedian, and a real Negro comic in the person of Billy Cumbie [sic], who has “done time” on Broadway.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 18, 1919
At the Theaters This Week
Empire—Musical revues are initiated at this theater for the summer, with Mitty De Vore and Ada Lum at the head of the company.

 
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), May 20, 1919
Charming Widows Open Summer Fun at Empire
Sam Levey’s “Charming Widows” are putting on a fluffy bit of nonsense called “Mixed Bon-Bons” at the Empire this week. Jimmie Cooper heads the male element; Manney Besser, Morris Tolan, Chas. A. Flemming, Brad Mitchel and Billy Cumber [sic] do all the funny business.

Act One is a drug store; Act Two is a hotel in the mountains, but that makes little difference. Mitty De Vere was the comical noise.

The frocks and frills and frou-frou are furnished by a feminine contingent headed by Helen Stanley, Florence Whitford and Ada Lum. This aggregation put on a lot of jazzy stuff,and dressed splendiforously [sic]. They even got away with “Dixie Land in France” in spite of the fact that several very fair songs have been written since that classic bloomed. Dixie Land has about left France by this time, but the burlesquers haven’t found it out yet.

The Charming Widows open the season of summer entertainment at the Empire. It’s a good show, and filled the house. Next week, the Parisian Beauties will entertain.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 21, 1919
Cadillac—There is a tray in store for Cadillac patrons next week when Sam Levey’s own company, “The Charming Widows,” arrive in town, opening with a matinee at 3 o’clock Sunday afternoon.

Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, James Cooper, Mitty Devore, Manny Besser and Morris Tolan with Billy Coumbie [sic], a Negro comedian of extraordinary ability, are in the leading roles of the two burlesque offerings. An augmented chorus, beautifully gowned, and special scenery will be one of the features of the performances.
Detroit Times (Michigan), May 24, 1919
Cadillac
Patrons of the Cadillac are promised the best show of the season next week with the arrival of “The Charming Widows,” Sam Levey’s own company.

Beyond question this is the premier bill that will be seen at any burlesque house this season, which is rapidly drawing to a close. There will be two comedians introduced merely as an excuse to give the large number of chorus girls an opportunity to display a number of abbreviated gowns. The company abounds in Detroit favorites with Ada Lum in the van. There is also dainty Helen Stanley one of the prettiest soubrettes in the business. Helen has other attractions besides her beauty, for she canning and dance. James Cooper is the leading comedian and Jimmy is some comedy kid. He is assisted by the irrepressible Mitty Devore with his Emerald Isle stuff and Manny Besser in his Jewish impersonations. Morris Tolan introduces some good Dutch comedy while Billy Coumbie [sic], a real Negro, offers real southern dialect impersonations.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 7, 1919
Coming
Burlesque fans will welcome “The Vampire Girls” in the Cadillac theater during the week of June 15, for the cast is made up of all old favorites. In the company are Jimmy Cooper, Manny Desser, Jewish comedian, Norris Tilen, Charles Fleming, Billy Coumbe [sic], that funny negro; Ada Lum, a Detroit girl always welcome here; pretty Helen Stanley, who has made a hit with the boys down in front and Millie Sherman and Dorothy Dean
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 14, 1919
Cadillac
Announcement by Manager Sam Levy, of the Cadillac theater, that the “Vampire Girls” coming to the Cadillac theater Sunday for a week’s engagement, will bring with them Jimmy Cooper, the rapid fire comedian, Manny Besser, Detroit’s favorite Jewish comedian and the always popular Ada Lum and Helen Stanley assures patrons of the theater of an up-to-date performance.

Besides this quartet will be seen Morris Tolen, Charles A. Fleming, Dorothy Dean, Millie Sherman and Billy Cumby, the latter a Negro fun maker. There is also a chorus of πBaby Vamps” that will keep things lively, for they have been elected for their beauty and vivacity. This is a show that the ladies should take advantage of the matinee performances which are attended by large numbers of the fair sex every day.

Detroit Times (Michigan), June 21, 1919
Coming
The “High Rollers” with a cast of Detroit favorites will be the attraction at the Cadillac theater during the week of June 29, starting with a matinee Sunday. In the company will be Jimmy Cooper, Manny Besser, Morris Tolan, Eddie Hall, Fred Darrow, Billy Cumby, Charles Fleming, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Millie Sherman and Rose Hemmley [sic]. In addition there is a large chorus of charming girls becomingly gowned in dainty frocks. Two musical comedies will make up the bill interspersed with numerous specialties and a wealth of good singing and dancing.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 26, 1919
Cadillac—In the Cadillac theater during the week of June 29, starting with a matinee performance Sunday, “The Big Sensation” will be the attraction. it will be a sensation for many novel features have been arranged for introduction during the two musical comedies that make up the show. There will be numerous specialties and a wealth of good singing and facing while comedy will be supplied in large measure. The company includes many local favorites, among whom are Jimmy Cooper, Manny Besser, Morris Tolan, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, Billy Cumby, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Millie Sherman and Rose Hemmley [sic] and a large chorus of pretty girls dresses in fetching costumes.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 30, 1919
Cadillac.
The “Big Sensation,” is the attraction in the Cadillac theater this week. It is another name for the company in which Manny Besser, Ada Lum, and some others, are the principals, and which is paying the Cadillac a visit every other week or so this summer.

The show is hardly entitled to its name—it is not a big sensation, but it is a fairly pleasing show. The chorus looks better than d=formerly—evidently some new girls have been added and some others “given the gait.”

The show has plenty of snap and lots of good singing. The comedy lines are rather bewhiskered and some of the jokes belong to the age of Noah. Manny Besser, Eddie Hall, Morris Tolen, Charles Fleming and Billy Cumby proved themselves able, while Helen Spencer, that diminutive blonde, is excellent. There’s a “school day” scene which is entertaining even if orthodox.

The show is in two parts. The costumes are good, and so is the scenery. The show could be better, but it very easily could be a lot worse. A dull afternoon or evening won’t be spent in the Cadillac.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 3, 1919
Cadillac—“The Wonder Girls,” coming to the Cadillac theater this for the week of July 6, starting with a Sunday matinee, is said to be one of the best burlesque shows offered during the present successful summer season. There is a large chorus of pretty girls, besides a large cast of principals who have proven great favorites here. Plenty of comedy, goof singing and dancing interspersed with numerous specialties make up the two acts comprising the show. Among the principals in the cast are Jimmy Cooper, Manny Besser, Morris Tolan, Charles Fleming, Billy Cumby, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Rose Hemmsley [sic] and Millie Sherman.
Detroit Times (Michigan), July 7, 1919
Cadillac.
The Oo La La Girls show—another name for the Big Sensation aggregation of last week—gave an interesting performance in the Cadillac theater, Sunday. The show, which will be here this week and next, has some new material, and the chorus is much better off thru the elimination of some girls and the substitution of others. The piece is well dressed and abounds with tuneful songs and snappy dances. The book is much better than last week and a general improvement in the whole tone of the company is evident.

Helen Stanley, the attractive and dainty little blonde, appears in a new role—that of a mind-reader—and her performance is interesting. The last part of it, however, is comedy, tho the audience doesn’t “get wise” at first.

Ada Lum is as attractive and as vivacious as ever, while George H. Ward, Billy Cumby, Jimmie Cooper, Charles Fleming and Morty Collins are full of vim and ability.

The show as a whole is a vast improvement over last week.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), July 9, 1919
What’s Doing in Burlesque
Sam Levy of Detroit has completed the roster of his “Beauty Review,” which will play the American Wheel.

The organization will include Jimmy Cooper, Ada Lum, Helen Stanley, Marty Collins, Charles Fleming, Billy Cumby, Morris Tolin and Eddie Hall, all of whom played in burlesque stock at the Empire theater in this city the summer. Rose Hemmily [sic] and John Goldsmith are listed as well.

Levy is president of the Cleveland Empire Co. The attraction will play that theater here.
Pittsburgh Press (Pennsylvania), November 9, 1919
Victoria
Burlesque
The “Beauty Revue” is the attraction at the Victoria theater this week, opening with the matinee tomorrow afternoon. The show has been seen in nearby cities and comes here with the reputation of being one of the best. Heading the troupe is a half-caste Chinese prima-donna, Ada Lum …
The Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), November 23, 1919
At the Gayety
The “Beauty Review” will be the Gayety attraction this week. Heading the troupe is the half-caste Chinese prima donna Ada Lum, with her Oriental beauty and Jimmy Cooper, the Beau Brummel of burlesque. No less worthy of mention are shapely and pretty Helene Stanley, Venus like Rose Hemley and a chorus of youthful beauties.

Comedy will be supplied by Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Morris Tolan, Charles Fleming and Billy Cumby. The ability of the members of the “Beauty Revue” is not confined to any one particular line of work. Each of them can dance, sing, play many different musical instruments, perform acrobatic stunts, juggle and do features of legerdemain.
Washington Herald (Washington, DC), November 30, 1919
Lyceum—“The Beauty Revue”
The “Beauty Revue,” which comes to the Lyceum Theater today, promises to be one of the big burlesque “hits” of the season. There are nine principals and a chorus of twenty youthful beauties in the company which have earned an enviable reputation on the road playing to capacity business all over the American circuit. The company is headed by Ada Lum, the American prima donna, and Jimmie Cooper, who are supported by Billy Cumby, Charles Flemming, Marty Collins, Rose Hemley, Eddie Hall and Morris Tolan.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), December 1, 1919
Lyceum—Burlesque.
The “Beauty Revue” at the Lyceum this week is a sumptuous show, with the funmaking in the hands of Marty Collins and Eddie Hall, assisted by Morris Tolin, Billy Cumby and Charles Flemming, “Beau Brummel” Jimmie Cooper heads the company, while Ada Lum, a half-caste Chinese plays opposite. A chorus of pretty girls, with many changes of costumes, and elaborate scenic effects are features.
Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 1, 1919
Lyceum.
There was not a dull moment in the “Beauty Review,” which opened a week’s engagement at the Lyceum Theater yesterday. The show is replete with clean comedy, specialties, the latest songs and good dancing. The company is made up of Ada Lum, Jimmie Cooper, Eddie Hall, Charles Flemming, Morris Tolan, Billy Cumby, and Marty Collins.
Washington Herald (Washington, DC), December 2, 1919
Lyceum—“Beauty Revue”
There was not a dull moment in the “Beauty Revue,” which opened a week’s engagement at the Lyceum Theater Sunday. The show is replete with clean comedy, specialties, the latest songs and good dancing. The company is made up of nine principals, each of whom have been starred on the burlesque wheels, chief among whom are Ada Lum, Jimmie Cooper, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, Morris Tolan, Billy Cumby, and Marty Collins. A large chorus of beautifully costumed girls out in front during the entertainment.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), December 6, 1919


Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), December 7, 1919


Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), December 13, 1919


The Sun (New York, New York), December 21, 1919


Billboard, December 27, 1919


Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), December 27, 1919


“Beauty Revue” at Plaza Next Week
“The Beauty Revue”  will be the attraction all next week. Sam Levey, the Detroit producer, who has put some of the best burlesque shows on the road, is the father of this production, which has met with much success. With “Beau Brummell” Jimmy Cooper, heading the company, and statuesque Ada Lum, playing opposite him in the leading feminine role, the cast is strong. Then, too there is that pretty soubrette, Helene Stanley and Rose Hemley in leading roles, while the comedy is furnished by Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Morris Tolan, Charles Flemming and Billy Cumby. There is a large singing and dancing chorus.
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), December 30, 1919
“Beauty Revue” at Plaza
Regular habitués of the Plaza theater voted “The Beauty Revue” which opened a week’s engage,meant there yesterday the fastest working show of the season and much better than most of its predecessors. The show is presented by Sam Levey and is made up of the customary pair of burlettas entitled respectively “A farmyard studio” and “The Garden of Alabazoo.” Both are showily dressed and stage. Jimmy Cooper, a well known burlesquer heads the company and proves as popular as ever while Ada Lum helps to keep things moving. Others are Helen Stanley, Rose Henley [sic], Eddie Hall, Marty Collins, Morris Tolan, Charles Fleming and Billy Gumby [sic].
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), January 11, 1920
Howard Athenaeum
The “Beauty Revue” burlesque company comes to the Howard Athenaeum tomorrow in “A Farmyard Studio.” Jimmy Cooper heads the cast, and those sharing the honors with him include Ada Lum, Helen Stanley and Rose Hemeley [sic]. Other favorites include Eddie Hall, Marty Collins, Morris Tolen, Charles Fleming and Billy Crumby [sic]. The chorus will present Florence and Anna Trotman, Midgie Gibbons, Rene Porter, Princess Livingston, Nan Albright, Florence Adams, Rae La Fave, Gean Berg, Marion Livingston, Josephine Davis, Nelda Travera, Beth Ruse and Peggy Weeks. …


Boston Herald (Massachusetts), January 13, 1920
Howard Athenaeum
All the patrons of the Howard Athenaeum thoroughly enjoyed the offering of the Beauty Revue company yesterday, and it served to introduce a number of clever comedians and pretty girls to the number of 20. Jimmy Cooper, long a burlesque star, was greeted with enthusiasm, and Ada Lum was another big favorite with everybody. The costumes were bright and natty, the comedy of the wholesome variety, and in fact the entire show had the imprint of originality. The management also offered an exceptionally good vaudeville bill which included the Exposition Four, Scamp and Scamp, Helen Moretti. Earl Williams was viewed in “When a Man Loves.”
Pawtucket Times (Rhode Island), January 17, 1920
Empire Theatre
Jimmy Cooper, one of the foremost burlesque stars, will appear in Sam Levey’s Beauty Revue at the Empire Theatre next week. The comedy features together with specialties and musical diversions, will combine to make the show one of the best which has been seen in this city, since the introduction of clean burlesque at the local theatre.

One of the best aggregation of stars ever gathered together in one company will be seen in the production. Every one of the principals in the large cast has earned stellar honors and each of them has been out with the leading roles on one company or another. Beautiful Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna has the principal feminine role while Jimmie Cooper leads the comedians into action. Dainty Helene Stanley and Rose Hemley assist Miss Lum while Cooper is aided in getting the laughs over by Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, Morris Tolan and Billy Cumby, the latter a negro comedian of the Bert Williams type. There is a large chorus of beauties who will appear in attractive gowns.

Marty Collins and Eddie Hall appear in tramp characterizations and Tolan in Hebrew roles. The show starts off with a jump, when Cooper is successful in setting a chorus girl strike 500 miles from Broadway by paying each one of them $200 a week. In this way only is his great cinema effort, “Why Dud She,” finished. Cooper, the energetic director, is also successful in bringing about a touching romance between Ada, a simple country girl, and Eddie, a city chap.
Evening Bulletin (Providence, Rhode Island), January 19, 1920
At the Theatres.
… “The Beauty Revue” is the burlesque for the week at the Empire. The company is headed by Ada Lum and Jimmie Cooper, and a number of attractive features are advertised, including the latest popular songs. Two tramp comedians are among the fun makers. …
 

Evening Bulletin (Providence, Rhode Island), January 20, 1920
Empire Theatre
“The Beauty Revue,” a burletta in two acts and eight scenes, at the Empire Theatre this week, provides one of the most varied entertainments seen on the burlesque stage in a long time. The company is fu of life from the start to finish, and while the musical numbers might be improved upon, the snap with which the production is given, the lively comedy and the dancing more than make up for it.

The opening sketch is entitled, “A Farmyard Studio.” Jimmie Cooper has the leading part, and he is ably assisted by Ada Lum, the leading woman of the company. Helene Stanley and Rose Hemley, ingenue and soubrette, are two live wires who help materially in putting the number over. The comedy is provided by Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, as hobos; Morris Tolen, a rube; Charlie Fleming, as a Hebrew, and Billy Cumby, as a negro.

The chorus is composed of many attractive young women, who sing and dance well. A feature of the musical numbers were selections by one of the chorus, who surprised yesterday’s audiences with a remarkably sweet voice, one which should entitle her to a better place than in the chorus.

Evening Bulletin (Providence, Rhode Island), January 22, 1920
same advertisement as January 19
Evening Bulletin (Providence, Rhode Island), January 23, 1920
same advertisement as January 19
Billboard, February 7, 1920
American Burlesque Assn.
Attraction at the Olympic Theatre. New York City, Week of January 26, 1920

Sam Levey Presents
“The Beauty Revue”
Original and new. A burletta in two acts and
eight scenes. staged and produced by
Jimmy Cooper
“A Farmyard Studio”

Review
A floral exterior stage set “Farm Yard Studio” with an ensemble of pretty girls in ingenuic attire awaiting their movie director. Jimmie Cooper opened the show with the artists demanding higher salaries and Cooper  introducing his rube financial backer, M. Tolen,  who agreed to everything suggested by the sportive Jim for screening of his masterpiece, entitled “Why Did She.” The feminine strikers protested against fifty dollars per week, but agreed to two hundred dollars per month. Cooper then sang “Don’t Shake That Shimmie Here,” and continued to encores until he had the entire company hitting up a pace seldom seen at the Olympic.

Cooper’s method of rehearsing bis posing artists introduced love rehearsal by Ada Lum and Ed Hall. The trio held the stage for some time with a repetition of the rehearsals, which evoked much laughter and applause. Marty Collins and Ed Hall, in bum characterizations, are fast and funny. Collins, a la Frisco, had an individual inning, in which he danced around the bases for a home run. A back drop, with sliding portals, manipulated by pages, introduced the choristers as motion picture stars in individnal recitations interpreting their titles. Billy Gumby, as a blackface artist, singing “Now,” with a wooden shoe dancing accompaniment, merited the encores accorded him.

A schoolroom scene, with Ada Lum as teacher, and the other principals and choristers as precious pupils, made for laughter by Collin’s ejaculations of “Hot dog! Let them run!” Ed Hall’s “Gits a guy sore, you know,” and M. Tolen’s Yiddish funnisms, which closed with the male principals as a singing quartet.

Part two opened at the fair grounds, with its varied scenic attractions, and with Cooper’s dissertations on his approaching wedding day with Prima Lum. M. Tolen’s impersonation of Charlie Chaplin was most artistic and realistic. An acrobatic dance and high dive over lined-up chairs proved Hall and Collins equal to many of the “big top” artists, Martin, as a blindfolded foreteller of color in hair by the kissing method; Helen Stanley’s memory garters, Cooper and his Jazz Bandtist, and Tolen with his baby banjo, singing “Sweet Mamma”; Dot Dean singing “’Till We Meet Again”; Cornetist Collins, with “Old Black Joe,” followed by a ukelele musicale, were one and all put over well. Ada Lum, leading the Misses Allbright, Livingston, Gibbons and Trotma, in a dancing specialty, demonstrated individual and collective ability. Doctor Cooper, a la Rattle Snake Oil Johnny Mack, put up an artistic ballyhoo while dispensing his safe, sure and speedy cure for rheumatism. He was burlesqued by Collins and Hall. Doctor Cheatums’s Turkish Bath, with Cooper as the doctor and Collins and Hall in evening dressed feminine attire, as patrons, with Prima Lum as chief attendant, was worked up for numerous laughs. The closing scene was Oriental, with Princess Alabazoo, a Grecian dancer.

Comment

A well-equipped production, with a profusion of costly and attractive gowns worn by principals and choristers alike, who individually are vocalists of ability. The feminine principals are very attractive and several of the choristers ran them a close second. The masculine principals are clever comedy workers, and, if we except’s Hall’s emphasized line and action while “registering” in his rehearsal with Miss Lum, the show was clean thruout. Jim Cooper is a logical and practical burlesque speed maniac. He sure did put pep and speed into the performance that captured the blase Olympicites.


Metropolitan Mirth—Melody—Music
Olympic Burlesque Theater—New York City
The Beauty Review
Ada Lum—“A Good Man Is Hard to Find,” “Gee But It’s Great to Be in the Movies”
Trenton Times-Advertiser (New Jersey), February 15, 1920
“Beauty Revue” Coming to Grand
Jimmy Cooper and Ada Lum Head Cast Here Friday and Saturday
The “Beauty Revue” coming to the Grand Theatre Friday and Saturday, with daily matinees, is one of the premier burlesque attractions on the road. Headed by Jimmie Cooper, called the “Beau Brummel” of burlesque, the cast boasts Ada Lum, Helene Stanley, Rose Memley [sic] and such well-known comedians as Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, Morris Tolan and Billy Cumby.

There is a burlesque treat promised for lovers of entertainment of the lighter variety. The “Beauties” have been gathered together for amusement purposes only, and that they have accomplished their purpose is proved by the large houses that have greeted them wherever they have shown.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), February 16, 1920
Grand—“Beauty Revue”
Two burlesques replete with comedy, specialties, singing and dancing will be offered by the “Beauty Revue,” which comes to the Grand Theatre Friday and Saturday with daily matinees.

There are nine principals and a chorus of girls in the company which has earned an enviable reputation on the road. Ada Lum, prima donna and Jimmie Cooper head the company, supported by Helene Stanley, Rose Memley [sic] and such well-known comedians as Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, Morris Tolan and Billy Cumby.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), February 17, 1920
Grand—“Beauty Revue”
The “Beauty Revue”, which comes to the Grand Theatre Friday and Saturday with daily matinees, is said to be one of the burlesque hits of the season. Sam Levey, the producer, gather the cast while Jimmie Cooper, who heads the company, wrote the two burlettas which make up the show and they are said to be the funniest that he has ever produced. A laugh a second, good singing and dancing and a display of elaborated costumes are promised. There are nine principals in the cast.

There is a large group of chorus girls while the women in the principal roles wear gowns that were designed especially for this production. Two acts of clean burlesque with numerous specialties, and dancing make up the bill. Ada Lum has the leading feminine role.
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), February 18, 1920
Grand—“Beauty Revue”
With Ada Lum and Jimmie Cooper in the leading roles, the “Beauty Revue” will open at the Grand Theatre Friday and Saturday, with daily matinees. Reports from other cities where this production has been seen state that it is one of the best on the road and has always played to capacity houses. There is a cast of nine principals and a large chorus. Two burlesques, replete with comedy situations, specialties and lots of good singing and dancing make up the program.

Then too, there is Helene Stanley, Rose Hemley in other roles, while the comedy is furnished by Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Morris Tolan, Charles Fleming and Billy Cumby.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), February 21, 1920
Trocadero—“Beauty Revue,” headed by Jimmy Cooper and Ada Lum, both noted in their field. Eddie Hall, nut comedian; Helene Stanley, blonde soubrette, and other favorites support. A rollicking extravaganza is promised.

 
Trenton Evening Times (New Jersey), February 21, 1920
Grand’s Revue a Hit
Probably the best offering of the current burlesque season at the Grand [T]heatre was put on view yesterday afternoon and evening when “The Beauty Revue” displayed its chorus, music and comedy in two hours of solid entertainment. The show has all the attributes of a musical success and a diverting book, light and humorous, provides the necessary laughs.

Ada Lum, a statuesque maiden, sings the prima donna role and she is given capable support by a company which includes among the male contingent one James Cooper. The time that Jimmy doesn’t spend before the footlights he seems to utilize for changing his clothes. The rest of the company is capable and the chorus is quite the best and most attractive that has been seen here this season. The show will be repeated today, afternoon and night.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), March 4, 1920
At the Majestic
… Ada Lum, the famous Chinese-American prima donna, will be the featured player in “The Beauty Revue” at the Majestic all next week.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), March 6, 1920


Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), March 8, 1920


At the Majestic
Burlesque lovers will sit up and take notice when the chorus in the “Beauty Revue” appearing at the Majestic theatre today for an engagement of one week troops out on the stage. There is a large group of these youngsters in bewitching costumes that hide none of their youthful curves while the women in the principal roles will wear gowns that were designed for this product. Two acts of clean burlesque with numerous specialties, lots of laughs and plenty of good singing and dancing make up the bill. There are nine principals in the company headed by statuesque Ada Lum and the irrepressible Jimmie Cooper.
Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), March 10, 1920


Ada Luom, Chinese-American prima donna, a fascinating lead 
in Sam Levy’s “Beauty Revue,” at the Majestic all this week.

Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), March 11, 1920
same advertisement as March 8

At the Majestic
There’s a frolicsome time at the theatre Majestic this week where the “Beauty Revue” is playing a week’s engagement. There have been shows here before but it is doubtful if there has been a gathering of such a group of happy maids and leaders as Jimmy Cooper, Ada Lum, Helene Stanley and their co-workers in this production. They are here for a good time and are so imbued with the spirit of joyousness that they want to pass the happy stuff around. This is merely an announcement to tell you they are in town. As to their merit your judgment is the best. See them and then tell us. Next week’s attraction will be the “Lid Lifters.”
The Record (Johnson City, New York), March 20, 1920
Marie Dressler is Coming to Armory
Popular Commedienne [sic] Will Be Seen in ‘Tillie’s Ro­mance’ Next Saturday
As Easter in all of its springtime beauty approaches, an air of gladsomeness permeates the being of every individual, and in this feeling much is expected from amusement venders to supply their patrons with much that is out of the ordinary in entertainment.

To be in keeping with this condition the management of the popular Armory Theatre comes forth with the announcement of two attractions this coming week, both on the musical order.

Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday the “Beau Brummell” of the musical comedy burlesque attractions, “The Beauty Revue,” will be presented in offering this attraction the management of the Armory ascertains that of all the entertainments of a similar nature that have been presented this season, none have surpassed this one in excellence, and in addition to a wonderful cast headed by Jimmle Cooper, the best comedy salesman in burlesque and Miss Ada Lum, the famous Chinese beauty, there is a chorus about which too much cannot be said. It is comprised of a bevy of pretty girls who are sure of making a big inroad on the affections of Binghamtonians. …
Auburn Citizen (New York), March 26, 1920
Burlesque Full of Pep.
Sam Levy’s aggregation styled The Beauty Revue was the burlesque offering at the Auditorium matinee and night yesterday. The show, which whizzed through two acts and eight scenes, pleased the large audiences and was a big improvement over the show of one week ago.

The feature of the revue was the pep shown by both principals and chorus. There was not a dull minute from the time the curtain went up until, the final ring down. The Beauty Revue staged and produced by Jimmie Cooper had the producer in the limelight throughout and he kept the show going at top speed.

In Eddie Hail, Marty Collins, Morris Tolen [sic], Charley Fleming, Billy Cumby and Johnny Bell, the show was well equipped with a bunch of live comedians who had a varied assortment of songs, dances and jokes and put them across in excellent style. Ada Lum, the prima donna of the attraction, and Princess Livingston and Rose Hemley had the principal female roles and were very pleasing in their numbers.

The chorus was large, well trained and not a bit hazy. The show was equipped with the best assortment of costumes of any of the burlesque shows shown here so far. The girls could dance well and their efforts to give enjoyment to those in front of the footlights were appreciated.

The Beauty Revue was just burlesque. There was a little bit of everything. The show opened with a scene labeled a Barnyard Studio, then shifted into a revue of motion picture stars in which the chorus girls imitated the big stars in filmdom, pretty and pleasing.

Johnny Bell as the dancing Chinaman showed a clever pair of pedal extremities in a dance specialty and the act comedy with a schoolroom scene with Ada Lum as the fetching schoolma’am and the principals and chorus participating in a number of school day pranks and jokes.

The second act showed scenes from a day at the county fair, some funny episodes at a Turkish bath and winding up with a whirlwind bunch of songs and dances, well staged and well presented.

Producer Cooper thanked the audiences for their evident appreciation of the efforts of the company to please and assured all that the show for next week, Harry Lang with his company of Lid Lifters, is recognized as one of the best shows on the burlesque wheels at the present time and urged the people of Auburn to back up Manager James A. Hennessy in his efforts to establish burlesque on a firm footing with Auburn theatergoers.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), April 8, 1920
“The Beauty Revue,” with Ada Lum, a big favorite in Cleveland, comes to the Empire. Miss Lum, one of the best known prima donnas in burlesque, is remembered from the fact of her election as the foremost comedienne in burlesque by a New York paper two years ago.
Detroit Times (Michigan), April 10, 1920
Another big production owned by Sam Levey, manager of the Cadillac, will be seen at that playhouse during the week of April 11, when the “Beauty Revue” with a long list of local favorites will be the attraction. There is not a burlesque fan in the city who is nor familiar with the names of Jimmie Cooper, Ada Lum, Helene Stanley, Rose Hemley, Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, Morris Tolan and Billy Cumby. All these favorites will be seen in the great revue aided by a large chorus.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), April 11, 1920
Empire—It is the Beauty Revue which Manager William Hexter announces for the week, with Jimmie Cooper, the Beau Brummell of burlesque, and Ada Lum, Cleveland favorite, as the principal actors. Others in the cast are Helene Stanley, Rose Hemley, Marty Collins, Eddie Hal, Morris Tolan, Charles Fleming and Billy Cumby. The company is well balanced throughout, and there is a chorus of twenty singing and dancing girls. The offering is a burlesque revue in two acts and eight scenes, and it should prove one of the best entertainments of the fast waning season. The feature of Cooper’s appearance is in the fact that he is the best dressed man in burlesque, never appearing twice in the same suit. Ada Lum recently won the popularity conducted by the New York Telegraph. 
 
 
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), April 12, 1920
The Beauty Revue, at the Empire, is headed by Jimmy Cooper and Ada Lum, both big favorites in Cleveland. Cooper is advertised as the best dressed man in burlesque, and Miss Lum recently won the popularity contest conducted among the theatrical leading women of the country. Sam Levey presents the offering.
Detroit Times (Michigan), April 15, 1920
Cadillac—Burlesque will be the attraction in the Cadillac next week with “The Beauty Revue,” the most pretentious production on the American circuit, as the offering. The show was produced by Sam Levey, manager of the Cadillac, and has been staged and costumed on an elaborate scale. The company includes Jimmie Cooper, the “Beau Brummel” of burlesque; handsome Ada Lum, the Chinese American prima donna; Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Charles Fleming, the whirl wind dancer, Morris Tolan, Billy Cumby and a large chorus.
Buffalo Courier (New York), April l6, 1920


Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), June 2, 1920
“Beauty Revue” Real Fun Show at Empire
Sam Levey’s “Beauty Revue” at the Empire this week is one of the few burlesque productions which lives up to its name. it is really a beauty revue, carrying the best looking chorus in burlesque.

Ada Lum has the leading feminine role, appearing in the first part as Ada Bara, a vamp character. She does full justice to it.

Bert Dennis is pinch hitting for Jimmy Cooper, who appeared with the production upon its former appearance here. His work is very good considering the time he has had to take Cooper’s place. Johnny Bell, with his dance specialty in the first part, is a big hit. His Chinese dance is a scream.

Two of the funniest men on the burlesque stage, the acrobatic hoboes, Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, get the laughs every time they appear. To round out the perfectly balanced corps of comedians is Billy Cumby, a blackface comedian of more than ordinary ability.

Princess Livingston and Rose Hemley are two young women who add greatly to the entertainment. Princess Livingston is well known to Cleveland audiences, and her work is appreciated to a greater extent with every appearance.

The production is full of pleasing musical numbers and the costumes and stage settings are above the average. The “Beauty Revue” is really a name which fits the show.
Buffalo Evening News (New York), June 5, 1920


Detroit Times (Michigan), June 5, 1920
Coming
Burlesque in the Cadillac theater during the week of June 12, will be presented by “The Beauty Revue,” a show produced by Sam Levey manager of the theater. With the irrepressible Jimmie Cooper, the peppery boy of burlesque, aided by pretty Ada Lum and a company of exceptional excellence, the show has been conceded to be one of the best on the American circuit.
Buffalo Evening News (New York), June 8, 1920
Academy-—Burlesque.
Two burlesques, replete with comedy, specialties, singing and dancing are being offered by the big “Beauty Revue” at the Academy theater this week.

Everything is new from girls to costumes and from jokes to songs, even the dance steps have been given new life by the members of the company. Ada Lum. Chinese-American prima donna, has the principal feminine part. Jimmy Cooper leads the comedians into action. Johnny Bell has a dance specialty.

The acrobatic hoboes, Eddie and Marty Collins, round out the comedians who include Billy Cumby, blackface.
Detroit Times (Michigan), June 14, 1920
Cadillac
The Cadillac theater began its final week of the season Sunday when The Beauty Revue gave two performances. Headed by the peppy Jimmy Cooper, the show succeeded in pleasing as much as could be expected in such hot weather.

Like all orthodox burlesque shows, The Beauty Revue is a mixture of song, dance, music and broad humor. Those who do the main work are [illegible] Cooper, Maurice Tole, Eddie Hall, Marty Collins, Billy Cummby [sic], Ada Lum and Rose Hemley.

Songs are in plenty and a wealth of dancing and comedy. The Beauty Revue show is a good one, tho no world beater.

The Cadillac will close Saturday night. Regular road shows will resumed August 1.
New York Clipper, July 21, 1920
Feature Chinese Girl
Jimmy Cooper has written a new dramatic sketch for the “Beauty Review” this season, in which he will feature Ada Lum, the American-Chinese prima donna. Cooper will also appear in tho act.
Rock Island Argus (Illinois), August 21, 1920
Illinois Theatre Opens Season with Bug Beauty Revue
Coming to the Illinois theatre for next Wednesday night is one of the banner attractions of the season. It is “Jimmie Cooper and his Beauty Revue.” This show has been the hit of the season, wherever it has played and always does capacity business so it behooves lovers of top notch burlesque to get in line early for their tickets. There are two acts in the show during which the latest song hits, dancing that will prove a surprise, lots of comedy and a bevy of darlings both among the principals and chorus are seen. Ada Lum, the Chinese American prima donna, has the principal feminine role while irrepressible Jimmie Cooper is the leading man, assisted by “Hot Dog Let ’Em Ride”—Marty Collins and “It gets a guy sore you know”—Eddie Hall, Johnnie Bell, Rose Hemley, Princess Livingston and that melody trio. “The penalty, a dramatic sensation is the feature.
Times-Republican (Marshalltown, Iowa), August 25, 1920
“The Beauty Revue”
At the Odeon Theater Friday Evening. Aug. 27.
“Jimmy Cooper and his Beauty Revue,” comes to the Odeon theater, opening Friday night, together with statuesyue [sic] Ada Lum, Eddie Hall and Marty Collins and an all star cast. Reports from other cities where this production has been seen state that it far surpasses last year’s production and that those who want to see it had better get their tickets early. There is a large cast of principals and a darling chorus. Two burlesques and a dramatic sensation make up the show, with specialties, lots of good singing, and dancing and a big display of lingerie. Odeon.
Echo de l’Ouest (Minneapolis, Minnesota), August 27, 1920
Gayety
La “Beauty Revue” une production do burlesque écrite par Jimmie Cooper, le beau brummel du burlesque sera au Gayety la semaine prochaine. M. Cooper remplit lui-même le rôle principal de cette production. Il est l’un des meilleurs et des plus jeunes impressarios américains. Mr Cooper dent la présence seule incite la plus grande hilarité s’est entouré d”artistes qui sont des étoiles dans leur genre respectifs. Cette représentation consiste en deux actes et plusieurs scènes. Le premier acte est intitulé
“Fun in a Schoolroom” et donne lieu a des scènes les plus originales et comiques.

M. Cooper s’est entouré d'artistes tels que: Ada Lum, la prima-donna chinoise-américaine; Princess Livingstone, Rose Hemley, Eddie Hall Marty Collins, Bernie Greene, Clarence Maurer et Johnny Bell.
Indiana Daily Times (Indianapolis, Indiana), September 25, 1920
Chinese-American Singer Heads ‘Beauty Revue’
Prominent in the cast of “The Beauty Revue,” which opens a weeks’ engagement Monday afternoon at the Park, is Ada Lum, a Chinese American prima donna.

Others in the cast as [sic] Jimmie Cooper, Princess Livingston, Rose Henley, Jimmie Cooper, chief comedian; Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Johnny Bell and the Melody Trio.

The press representative refers to the chorus with this show as “The American Beauty Chorus.”
Indiana Daily Times (Indianapolis, Indiana), September 27, 1920
Opening at the Park today for a week’s run is Jimmie Cooper’s “Beauty Revue,” in which Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna, is one of the featured players.
Indiana Daily Times (Indianapolis, Indiana), September 28, 1920
Acrobatic Hoboes in the Park Show.
In “The Beauty Review,” Jimmie Cooper’s offering at the Park, can be found anything to your liking.

Just as you are Interested in the movie queens they-swing you to drama and then snappy jazz, which runs through for two acts without an idle moment.

Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, as acrobatic hoboes, never fall to put it over and are a riot of fun from the time they appear until they nearly “wreck” the performance as a Jazz band.

The drama holds one throughout and is a reminder to those who have gone “wrong” to make amends before it is too late, or suffer the consequences of their life as it is led in which Ada Lum, as the “woman,” and Jimmie, Cooper, as the “fool,” portray well their parts.

“Fun in a Schoolroom,” takes us back to the "dear” eld days and Ada Lum as the teacher, with a room of boisterous pupils affords many a laugh.

Johnny Bell, as the dancing Chinaman, gives several good imitations and his clog dancing is good.

The costumes and scenery throughout the show are rich in color, and beautiful girls such as the chorus is, blends well amid such surroundings.

The music is of the stay in the brain kind and as they bid you goodby in the Oriental scene everybody is sorry that they must bid au revoir.
Cincinnati Post (Ohio), October 11, 1920
Empress
Jimmie Cooper’s “Beauty Revue,” at the Empress, is a gale of laughter. Cooper, the principal comedian, is assisted by Eddy [sic] Hall and Martie [sic] Collins, among the funniest fellows in burlesque. Ada Lum is above the average as a burlesque prima donna. Princess Livingston and Rose Memley [sic] also are good. The chorus is good looking and can sing.
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), October 14, 1920
Reid Believes in Changes.
… [Jack] Reid is personally recommending next week’s show—Jimmy Cooper with “The Beauty Revue,” including Ada Lum.
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), October 15, 1920
Coming to the Theaters.
To the Lyceum next week will come another import ant extravaganza of this season, worthy of rank with Jack Reid’s, namely Jimmy Cooper’s “Beauty Revue,” in which Ada Lum supplies both beauty and voice as prima donna.
Billboard, October 23, 1920


Metropolitan Mirth—Melody—Music
American Burlesque Circuit
Olympic Burlesque Theater—New York City
The Beauty Review
Ada Lum—“Old Black Joe”
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), October 24, 1920
Empire—Jimmie Cooper and his Beauty revue is listed by Manager Phil Isaacs for the week. Cooper, as a producer, is winning a reputation for himself. He is known as “the man who never wears the same suit twice,” and is billed as “the best dressed man in burlesque.” Ada Lum, a big Cleveland favorite, is his prima donna. She is of Chinese-American parentage, and is a noted stage beauty. Rose Hemley and Princess Livingston are in the cast, while the comedy is contributed by Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, acrobatic tramps; Johnny Bell, the dancing Chinaman; and Bernie Greene. There are various specialties, electric novelties, a big production, and a singing and dancing chorus. Book and music are new in their entirety.



Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), October 25, 1920
In burlesque Jimmie Cooper and his Beauty Revue visit the Empire. Cooper is announced as “the best dressed man in burlesque,” and long has been a popular player on this time. Ada Lum comes back to Cleveland. She is one of the beauties of the stage.
Detroit Times (Michigan), October 26, 1920
Avenue—The Beauty revue, a carnival of music and joy, produced by Jimmie Cooper and led by Ada Lum, Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, comes to the Avenue the week beginning Sunday afternoon.

Detroit owned, written, produced and manager, the Beauty revue was one of the fastest, most beautiful, and the biggest money magnets on the wheel a year ago, and this year it bids fair to exceed former marks.

Ada Lum again is prima donna. With her are Rose Hemley and Princess Livingston.

Eddie Hall is the most agile acrobatic comic in burlesque. Others are Bernie Green, a smooth singer, and Johnnie Bell, the dancing Chinese boy.

The two parts, “The Farmyard Studio” and “A Day at the Fair Grounds,” are superbly staged. “The Penalty,” a dramatic offering, is an added feature.

An extra performance is scheduled for midnight, Nov. 2, when returns will be read from national, state and county elections 10 seconds after they are received in Detroit by Western Union.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), October 26, 1920


Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), October 27, 1920
Melodrama Feature of “Beauty Revue” at Empire
Jimmy Cooper has long been known as the Beau Brummel of burlesque, the man who never wears the same suit twice in a performance, and the Flo Ziegfeld of the American circuit as a result of his ability to select beautiful chorus girls; but no person ever gave him credit for being an actor who could take a legitimate part. In the “Beauty Revue” at the Empire this week, however, Cooper shows that he can act. The piece is entitled “The penalty.”

The plot is a triangle, a brother making inroads upon the affection of his brother’s  sweetheart. Climaxes come fast. Brothers are reconciliated and the one who has become a sudden drunkard turns upon the women he blames for his condition. Glassware is broken promiscuously as the drink-crazed man hurls everything within sight at he woman, played by Ada Lum, who retaliates by a realistic choking scene. It ends in an uproar with each dying from bullet wounds.

Aside from the melodramatic feature the show is full of good things. There is the stately Miss Lum in fetching costumes and pleasing songs. Cooper in his comedy aided by the fun making of Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, the fiddling of Bernie Greene, the dancing by Johnny Bell, the singing and dancing of princess Livingston and Rose Hemley, and the general all around ability of a chorus which entitles the show to rightly lay claim to the name, “The Beauty Revue.”

Costumes and stage settings are elaborate. Cooper admits that it costs hims wad of money to supply glassware to be broken in the act.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), October 28, 1920
 
 
Clever Stage Beauty Is Prima Donna at Empire
Ada Lum, stage beauty, and one of the favorites of the burlesque world, is rims donna with Jimmy Cooper and his Beauty Revue at the Empire this week. Miss Lum is of Chinese and American parentage, and is known as one of the leading beauties of the stage.
Detroit Times (Michigan), October 30, 1920



 
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), October 30, 1920
 

Telegraf (Baltimore, Maryland), November 19, 1920


Baltimore American (Maryland), November 21, 1920

 
Evening Star (Washington DC), November 21, 1920
Cooper’s Revue
“Jimmy Cooper and his Beauty Revue” will be next week’s burlesque attraction at the Folly Theater. There are two acts with the latest song hits, dancing and comedy. Ada Lum, Chinese-American prima donna, with Jimmie Cooper as the leading man, head the cast. “The Penalty,” a dramatic sensation is a feature.
The Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), November 21, 1920
Gayety—The burlesque here will be Jimmy Cooper and his Beauty Revue, with Jimmy Cooper, Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Johnnie Bell, Bernie Green, Ada Lum, Rose Hemly [sic] and Princess Livingston.


The Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), November 23, 1920
Gayety
Marty Collins, one of the most original comedians who has visited Baltimore this season, delighted his audience yesterday with his whimsicality. Collins was aided in his funmaking by Eddie Hall, who accentuates his comedy by acrobatic stunts, Ada Lum, prima donna, sings well, and Rose Hemley dances gracefully. Johnny Bell, a Chinese dancing comedian, rounds out a pleasing burlesque entertainment.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 28, 1920


Folly—Cooper’s Revue
The Folly Theater, commencing today at 3 p. m., will present “Jimmie Cooper and His Beauty Revue.” It is one of the big burlesque shows of the season.

Jimmie Cooper, the man who never wears the same suit twice, heads the company, with Ada Lum, the half caste Chinese American beauty, playing opposite. Others include Rose Hemley, Princess Livingston, Marty Collins and Eddie Hall, the acrobatic tramps; Johnny Bell, the dancing Chinaman, and Bernie Green.
Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 28, 1920


“Beauty Revue” Opens Today for Folly Fans
Jimmy Cooper Said to Have Fine Burlesque Company Here.
Jimmy Cooper and his Beauty Revue opens today at 3 p. m. at the Folly Theater for the week.

Cooper made such a distinct hit over the American burlesque circuit last year that he decided to take out his own show, produced and staged by himself, and those who had the pleasure of seeing him last season will agree that Jimmy, under his own management is a huge success.

The star however, is not egotistical, and did not agree to take the road until support of the players who had helped him make the “Beauty Revue∏ the biggest box office attraction of the 1920 season. So burlesque fans will see practically the same aggregation in the cast behind the “Beau Brummell.”

Ada Lum, the statuesque, Chinese-American prima donna, will have the principle feminine role, which will allow her to display her wonderful wardrobe. …
Washington Times (Washington, DC), November 30, 1920
Jimmie Cooper and His ‘Beauty Revue’ at Folly
Patrons of the Folly Theater can well feel assured of a good, rollicking burlesque show this week, as Jimmie Cooper and his “Beauty
Revue” hold the boards. It is a big joy jubilee, full of real comedy situations and snappy, tuneful song hits. The scenery and costumes are bright and elaborate, and display good judgment and taste in their selections.

There is introduced a scene called “The Moving Picture Stars’ Revue,” a scene in a Turkish bath, and a dramatic hit, “The Penalty.”

The company supporting Mr. Cooper, who has earned stellar honors. include beautiful Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna, in the principal feminine part; dainty Princess Livingston, and shapely Rose Hemly, Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Johnny Bell, Bernie Green, and a large chorus of youthful beauties.
Evening Public Ledger (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania), December 4, 1920
Trocadero—“Jimmie Cooper and His Beauty Revue,” with Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna. Jimmie Cooper, Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Johnny Bell, Rose Hemley, Princess Livingston and Bernie Green, are among the clever principals.
Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), December 5, 1920


Trocadero
Jimmie Cooper brings his “Beauty Revue” here this week in a brand new production, which is said to be a frolic with plenty of jazz, numerous specialties, laughs aplenty and bevies of pretty girls, appropriately costumed. Jimmie Cooper, Eddie Hall, Marty Collins, Bernie Green, Ada Lum, Rose Hemley and Princess Livingston are in the cast.
Brooklyn Standard Union (New York), December 10, 1920
Extraordinary ability, combined with beauty, a statuesque figure and a rare singing voice combined, have made Ada Lum, prima donna with Jimmie Cooper and his “Beauty Revue” at the Star next week, a prominent figure on the burlesque stage.
Evening Telegram (New York), December 12, 1920
Where Burlesque Changes Weekly
“The Beauty Revue” will be given at the Star Theatre, Brooklyn, tomorrow afternoon. Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna, has the principal feminine part, while Jimmie Cooper leads the comedians into action.


New York Clipper, December 22, 1920
Jimmy Cooper’s “Beauty Revue” Very Good Show
Jimmy Cooper has given the American Burlesque Circuit one of the best shows we have seen at the Star this season in his “Beauty Revue.” It os practically the same as last season except that he has added a dramatic act called “The Penalty” that closes the first part of the show. This act alone is worth the price of admission. It is a wonderful act, has a moral, was cleverly, acted and when the curtain went down at the finale the applause was loud and long. Cooper appeared with Miss Lum, two of the principals in the act and was compelled to make a speech.

The show, staged by Cooper, is in two acts and eight scenes, with Cooper handling the straight. He, as everyone knows, is one of the best straight men in burlesque and has a way of handling his fellow players that make them stand out. He displays great showmanship all through the performance. He is a neat dresser and a performer.

Eddie Hall and Marty Collins are handling the comedy, both doing tramp characters. They have improved as comedians a great deal since we saw them last season. They work fast and never miss an opportunity to get a laugh. Hall is a fine tumbler, in addition to being a funny fellow, while Collins, a dancer and comedian, has developed into quite a musician, playing the cornet and several other instruments finely.

Bernie Greene, a new man to us, plays several characters in good form. He does a young rube, not using the chin piece, a Hebrew and straight, doing each with credit to himself. We like his work and he will be heard from later.

Johnny Bell does a Chinese and plays the part well. He does not do much but is alright. Bell is a fine hoofer and goes big in a specialty he does.

Ada Lum, the noted American Chinese prima donna, looked beautiful, displayed elaborate gowns and worked in her scened most acceptably. Her numbers were rendered in her usual clever way.

Rose Hemley, a fast soubrette, danced her way through her numbers and put them over with a lot of pep. Her wardrobe is pretty.

Princess Livingston, the ingenue, a shapely young girl, although handicapped somewhat with a cold, put her numbers over pleasingly. She also worked nicely in the scenes and read her lines well . Her dresses are very becoming. She danced well also.

Cooper started the show off with a bang and, not alone had his chorus on in the opening, but all his principals, each one working it up as well as singing and making a fine impression.

Collins did nicely in his dancing specialty.

The motion picture rehearsal in one was amusing and full of laughs as it was given by Cooper, Hall, Collins and Miss Lum.

The “Movie Picture Stars Revue” staged with each chorus girl impersonating a well known actress of the screen in a special setting, went over nicely. Collins and Hall injected a lot of comedy into this scene.

Bell followed this with a hard shoe dancing act specialty which was well received.

The “Penalty” followed. Its a dramatic sketch played by four people and tells a story of a wealthy fellow, who had wasted his life away with dissipation and was in the last stages of paresis. He was living with his mistress. A younger man comes along and falls in love with the woman and wants to elope with her. The two men meet in the former’s palatial home and a quarrel follows, when they discover they are brothers. The men then agree to go away and live a new life. The younger goes out and, as the other starts to leave later, his mistress appears, they too get into a quarrel, she shoots and kills him and herself. During this quarrel; in fit of anger, the man throws vases and anything he can lay his hands on at the woman, who gets in back of a door just in time to protect herself. Half a dozen vases are broken in this manner. Some prop bill this show must have.

Cooper played the man and acted the part wonderfully well. In fact, he stamped himself an actor of rare ability. He did not overdo the character, a hard one to handle for a burlesque audience. He worked very hard.

Miss Lum was the mistress and covered herself with glory in this role. She played it as it was intended. She was forgotten at a burlesque prima donna and, instead, blossomed out as a real emotional actress. She was very good.

Bernie Greene, as the brother, showed that he, too, can play parts and was very good. Rose Hemley was the maid, playing this small part very well.

It is a fine act, different than anything in burlesque and a real diversion. It was appreciated by a packed house.

Greene offered a violin specialty in one that was well received down in the middle of the last part.
 
Newburgh Daily News (New York), December 28, 1920
‘The Beauty Revue’ a Fine Production of Burlesque
The Jimmy Cooper burlesque production, “The Beauty Revue”, which opened in the Cohen opera House yesterday, comes up to all claims made for it by the press agent. If anything, it goes a little beyond.

Says Panhandle Pete: “If there was a load of hay on one side of a river and a jackass on the other, and the jackass was hungry and wanted the hay, and couldn’t swim, how could the jackass get at the hay?” After pondering, or reckoning to ponder, Lonesome Luke, replies: “I dunno, I give it up”.

“That’s what the other Jackass did”, answers Pete.

The show is made up of clever bits of comedy, with a tabloid drama interpolated in the first act programmed as “The Penalty”, which is a bit of drama, depicting how two brothers want the same woman—not knowing they are brothers, until near the climax. In this act Jimmy Conner does some dramatic execution worthy of a tragedian. He brought down the house with his acting. Others in the cast of this tabloid who deserve mention are Ross Hemley, Bernie Green and Ada Lum, the last-named portraying a vampire in real Kipling style.

From here on the affair reverts to straight comedy with bits by specialists, and continues so unto the end. Eddie Hall, as Panhandle Pete, is a delightful burlesque tramp comedian; Marty Collins, as Lonesome Luke, a down and out thespian, is funny throughout; Johnny Bell, as chink, who does the individual dancing, was a riot with his audience. Ada Lum, stately prima donna, is thoroughly efficient in all her parts; Princess Livingston, dynamic soubrette, has no trouble getting in right with her auditors, whole Rose Henley, dainty ingenue, makes good right from the start.

The company carries a clever, pretty chorus consisting of the Misses Gibbons, Kelly Edwards, Billings, LaClair, Miller, Moore, Livingston, Allen, Diggs, Baybuck, Kennedy, Davis, Bradley, and Lum. “The Beauty Revue” is playing again tonight and tomorrow afternoon and night.
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), January 22, 1921


Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), January 25, 1921
“The Beauty Revue”
Cooper’s Show Is Liked by Patrons of the Plaza
Jimmy Cooper brought a clever aggregation in his “Beauty Revue” to the Plaza theater yesterday. It appears to be a good idea to have the owner of a show on the job in the center of the stage a good deal of the time, as he keeps his employes working at a peppery speed. He is an easy boss, however, and gets results by amiable “kidding” rather than by rough stuff. An exception is in the case of Eddie Hall, tramp comedian, whom Cooper handles a la Dempsey. However, Hall seems to thrive on it, and he kept the audience laughing with his “It gets a guy sore, y’all know.” Marty Collins, his partner, has a large bundle of jokes, and his catch phrase, “Hot dog! Let ’em ride!” always seemed to be sprung at the right time for a laugh. Cooper himself proved capable especially in “The Penalty,” a novelty at the end of the first act. His portrayel [sic] of a dissipatd [sic] old man suddenly meeting his long-lost brother under tragic circumstances, was realistically done. Ada Lum, the Chinese-American girl, attracted much attention as the leading woman, and acts with quiet effect. The ingenue, Rose Hemley, and “Princess” Livingston, the soubrette, are all over the stage and then some in leading the chorus. Each member of the chorus was personally introduced by Cooper, and it would appear that they represent about all parts of the United States. Johnny Hall [sic], Chinese dancing comedian, danced as well on his back as o his feet. Bernie Green did clever stunts with the violin. The costuming was new and vivid in coloring. A waltzing content was announced for Thursday night and on Friday night each member of the chorus will do a stunt, not the ordinary “chorus girl’s contest,” it was stated but they will make up as leading members of the company and other well-known characters and endeavor to display their talent.
Greenfield Recorder (Massachusetts), January 27, 1921
“Beauty Revue,” Feb. 3
Extraordinary ability, combined with beauty, a statuesque figure and a rare singing voice combined, have made Ada Lum, prima donna with “Jimmie Cooper and his Beauty Revue,” appearing at the Lawler for Wednesday, February 2, a prominent figure on the burlesque stage.

Miss Lum, the daughter of a Chinese mandarin and a wealthy French lady, was born in New Orleans. Her father, who after being in this country for several years, took up the study of medicine and soon gained a large practice in the southern city. He wanted his daughter to be a nurse. Ada, however, would have none of it. She had a wonderful voice and having participated in several musical concerts, yearned for a life on the stage. Against the objections of her parents she used funds left her by an uncle in China to study music and soon was recognized as a possibility for grand opera.

She strained her voice and could not take the top notes in many of the operas, so turned her attention to musical comedy, in which she made a great success. If Jimmie Cooper, with his persuasive ways, had not come along his great star would probably be still warbling to Broadway audiences instead of delighting thousands of burlesque patrons.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), February 1, 1921
Miles.
Burlesque patrons of the Miles theater have a treat in store Thursday, Friday and Saturday when “Jimmie Cooper and his Beauty Revue” will be the attraction. Jimmy Cooper, the producer, who has earned a reputation for putting out one of the best shows on the road, is the father of this production. “Beau Brummel” Jimmie Cooper, the man who never wears the same suit of clothes twice, heads the company and statuesque Ada Lum, the half caste Chinese American beauty plays the leading feminine role. Then too, there is Rose Hemley and also Princess Livingston in important roles while the comedy is furnished in quantities by Marty Collins and Eddie Hall the “Acrobatic Tramp;” Johnny Bell, the dancing Chinaman, and Bernie Green. While this is sufficient to amuse almost any burlesque audience there is still the chorus to be considered and it is claimed by the press agents to be a bunch of youthful and handsome darlings.


Schenectady Gazette (New York), February 2, 1921
Miles
With the arrival of the “Beauty Revue” at the Miles theater tomorrow for a stay of three days burlesque patrons will see principals in the large cast who have earned stellar honors. Ada Lum, the Chinese American prima donna, has the principal feminine part while Jimmie Cooper leads the comedians into action. Dainty Princess Livingston and Rose Hemley assist Miss Lum, while Jimmie Cooper is aided in getting the laughs over by Marty Collins, Eddie Hall, Johnny Bell and Bernie Green. There is a large chorus of girls who display lovely gowns.

 
Ridgewood Times (New York), February 4, 1921


Schenectady Gazette (New York), February 5, 1921
Miles
Jimmy Cooper and his “Beauty Review” burlesquers, are the features at the Miles theater today. The show is brought into the category of burlesque by the work of Eddie Hall and Marty Collins, comedians, and the chorus. Others in the cast are Rose Hemley, Princess Livingstone [sic] and Ada Lum. Jimmy Cooper’s personality, however, is sufficient in itself to make him the star while his ingenuity is proven by the original bits interjected throughout the production. The whole thing is as new as anything in the 20th century can be. Among the numbers that are proving most popular in this city are the dramatic sketch, “The penalty” and the dance of Johnny Bell the “Dancing Chinaman.” The show opens with a farm yard studio setting in which Cooper plays the role of the manager of a standard moving picture company. The second act is a frolic of fun.


Brooklyn Daily Eagle (New York), February 8, 1921
Burlesque
The Gayety.
Brooklyn welcomed home Harry Cooper and his Beauty Revue last night with a large audience at the Gayety Theater. Mr. Copper, is at least half of the attraction. His chief assistant is Ada Lum.
Billboard, February 26, 1921
Burlesque Reviews
“Jimmie Cooper’s Beauty Revue”—Staged and produced by Jimmie Cooper. An American Circuit attraction at the Olympic Theater, New York, week of February 14.

The cast—Jimmie Cooper, Ada Lum, Princess Livingston, Rose Henley, Eddie Hall, Marty Collins, Bernie Green, Johnny Bell.

Chorus—Midgie Gibbons, Dorothy Keller, Buster Edwards, Nora Billings, Helen LaClair, Louise Miller, Etna Moore, Marion Livingston, Flo Allen, Ethel Diggs, Verna Raybuck, Vary Kennedy, Josephine Davis, Mae Bradley, Yankee Marleau, Nina Morse.

Review

Into a farmyard movie studio came an ensemble of feminine principals and choristers clamoring for back salary until the arrival of Manager Jimmie Cooper, who promised not only the salary due, but a raise from $30 a week to $100 a month, which the girls accepted amidst the applause of the audience. To celebrate the event the girls, exceptionally attractive, sang and danced as if they really enjoyed speeding up under the personal supervision of Straight Jimmie Cooper.

With a movie scenario, entitled “Why Did She,” Director Cooper started on to cast his characters, who appeared in the persons of Ada Lum, the slender, stately brunet American-Chinese prima donna, as the Vampire; Eddie Hall, a typical burlesque tramp comic, as the hero, and Marty Collins, in a similar makeup and mannerism to Hall, as the son.

In the first part Bernie Green did a juvenile rube, and did it realistically. Johnny Bell looked and acted the part of a Chink. Rose Hemley and Princess Livingston, two attractive brunets, divided honors as ingenue-soubrets.

In front of a drop in one Director Cooper rehearsed Prima Lum and Comic Hall in a love-making bit, during which he handed repeated slaps to Hall’s face that brought forth his lament, “It gits a guy sore, you know,” while the audience laughed and applauded.

A silken satin draped interior of studio, with Pages Yankee Marleau and Nina Morse at the portieres and Director Cooper as the announcer. Introduced the choristers as movie  picture stars. Their personality and impersonations of movie stars were far more attractive than some of the originals. In front of a drop in one Chink Johnny Bell put over his  dancing and imitation specialty and reniged [sic] on the encores that his clever impersonations and dancing merited.

Princess Livingston, with a lineup of choristers. put over “Dangerous Eyes” and worked their own on the audience to the liking of those who thought that they were individually it. An elaborate reception room set was the scene of what was programed as the dramatic sensation, “The Penalty,” introducing Ada Lum, in evening gown, as the woman; Bernie Green, juvenile straight, as the man; Rose Hemley,  as the maid, and Jimmie Cooper, as the fool.

Lover Bernie complains of Protector Jimmie, and Mistress Ada defends his liberality and denounces Lover Bernie, who can give her nothing. At this point Protector Jimmie returns from an auto ride suspicions of a rival, whom he discovers in Lover Bernie. Then comes a tense moment of suspense, until Protector Jimmie, in the uprising light, is  revealed as a tottering, palsied old libertine, who denounces Ada as a prostitute and her lover, Bernie, as a pimp. Drawing a revolver he is about to shoot Lover Bernie, when, demanding his name and hearing it, discovers in the lover his own brother. Accusation, recrimination and reconciliation follow in quick order, and Bernie exits to give Protector Cooper an opportunity to break with the woman, Ada.

Denouncing her, he flies into a frenzy of passion, tries to shoot her, but is strangled in turn by her, and, reclining on a couch, throws a vase at her as she fakes refuge behind a door. This he continues to do until all the bric-a-brac in the apartment is demolished, whereupon Ada, procuring the revolver, shoots him, then herself, as Bernie re-enters for the finale to an uproar of applause from the audience, whose recalls brought Jimmie and Ada out of character to the footlights, where Jimmie informed the audience that the playlet was his own conception, based on Kipling’s “Vampire” and Jim Corbett’s “Pals.” …


Metropolitan Mirth—Melody—Music
American Burlesque Circuit
“Jimmie Cooper and His Beauty Revue”
Ada Lum—“Gee But It’s Great to Be in the Movies,” “Old Black Joe”

Reading Times (Pennsylvania), March 3, 1921
(Rajah advertisement)
Two Days Today and Friday, March 3, 4
Matinee Daily
Jimmie Cooper’s Beauty Revue with Ada Lum, Eddie Hall and Marty Collins
Niagara Falls Gazette (New York), March 24, 1921


Buffalo Evening News (New York), April 2, 1921


4—Ada Lum with Jimmie Cooper’s
“Beauty Revue,” at Academy.

Englewood Economist (Chicago, Illinois), April 13, 1921
See Marty Collins at the Englewood
… In the cast will be found statuesque Ada Lum, pretty and shapely; Rose Hemley, Princess Livingston, playing a soubrette, … and Johnnie Bell, a Chinese dancing comedian of extraordinary ability. …
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), September 3, 1921


Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), September 6, 1921
Improved Plaza opens Season with “The Passing Revue”
The Plaza theater had a sort of rejuvenation yesterday when I. H. Herk’s “Passing Review” show, plus Jim Bennett and Ada Lum, provided the festivities attending the opening of the redecorated and enlarged house. Also the dove of peace, who had been moving around on crutches owing to labor troubles connected with the national burlesque business, soared aloft yesterday on free pinions, all difficulties having been settled, even “Dan” Haggerty, one of the burlesque agents of the stage hands, lending his approving presence to the occasion. The new decorations are in bright hues of whites, old rose and gray, and the former rather gloomy interior of the house fairly sparkled by comparison i nits new dress. The stage has been increased 10 feet in depth by removing the rear wall and extending it, and is now 42 feet in depth from apron to rear. The exists [sic] have been increased in number, enlarged and altered so that now all those except the main one on Taylor street lead directly to Main street. The stage is now able to accommodate any production.

Coming back to “The Passing Show,” it may be stated that no better opening attraction could be provided, the principals being capable, while the chorus, although showing somewhat lack of smoothness in some of the intricate numbers, owing to the fact that the show opened here yesterday, is filled with youthful girls who work with enthusiasm. It was stated that all but three of them are newcomers and their fresh appearance (the adjective being used here in its common, not slangy, sense) lending proof of the statement. The costuming was original, a number in which all the flowers of a large garden were introduced, being the best. Jim Bennett bore up the entire burden of the comedy, and was equal to the occasion, which mush of his success was due to the fervor of the straight man’s work with whom he played. Ray King being said straight man, Ada Lum, who was ill here when she played last year and unable to do herself justice, comes back strong as the leading woman, and helps to keep the performance going at a lively clip. Rose Hemley, the soubrette, and Bobetta Hall, the ingenue, fill their roles satisfactorily. The eccentric dancing and instrumental work of Lew Rice are commendable. a one-act play “The Frameup,” is a novelty that is acted with high dramatic fervor by the principals of the company.
Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), September 7, 1921


Springfield Daily News (Massachusetts), September 8, 1921

 
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), September 11, 1921


Wilkes-Barre Times-Leader (Pennsylvania), October 10, 1921
“The Passing Revue”
Girls—youthful, fresh and altogether charming—are one of the especially touted features with “The Passing Review,” which, with Jim Bennett and Ada Lum as the featured members, Mr. I. H. Herk brings to the Majestic theatre for three days, starting this afternoon.

Herk’s chorus requirements were but three—youth, charm and beauty—singing and dancing could be learned by capable instructors.

And so it happened that when “The Passing Review” was put in rehearsal there was a decided absence of old and familiar faces, but there were present girls from the farm and the factory—girls from the small town ad the college campus—girls from the department store counter and from the High School—and all of them young, pretty, vivacious and ambitious.

They varied in heights, and they varied, as our mercantile friends would say, in tonnage, but they possessed Herk’s three requisites—youth, charm and beauty.

The enthusiastic advance representative of “The Passing Review”, waxes almost hysterical when mention is made of the chorus of his attraction, and it is to be noted that his advertising dwells dominantly upon the girls rather than upon the principals.

However, we are assured by the management that the show is no wise lacking in competent principals, an the names of Jim Bennett and Ada Lum are pointed to as supporting evidence. Bennett is admittedly the peer of any present day burlesque comedian, while Miss Lum may safely said to be an ideal leading lady addition to any cast.


Knickerbocker Press (New York), October 16, 1921
Schenectady Will See ‘The Frame Up’ Thursday
I. H. Herk’s “Passing Review,” with Jim Bennett and Ada Lum as featured members, comes to Van Curler Opera house, Schenectady, for three days, commencing Thursday, with daily matinees. Levity is abandoned temporarily, during the second act, and a short dramatic episode of the underworld is unfolded. “The Frame Up” it is entitled, with Mark Linder, as principal player.

Jim Bennett and Ada Lum are “the life of the party” in burlesque. Bennett, this season, has been fitted with a “bookÆ precisely to his liking. Miss Lum Is likewise cast to excellent advantage.

The Misses Rose Hemley and Bobetta Hall, two pretty and talented girls, are important factors in the performance; and there is also Ray King, a fast working and convincing “straight man,” and Lew Rice, a natty, dancing juvenile. A chorus of eighteen pretty young girls complete the ensemble.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), October 17, 1921
“The Passing Revue”
Jim Bennett and Ada Lum are the announced head-liners with I. H. Herk’s “Passing Review,” programmed for appearance in the Van Curler Thursday, Friday and Saturday with daily matinees. “The Passing Review” offers an entertainment somewhat at variance with that presented by the average burlesque organization, the “review” nature of the show permitting the taking of many liberties denied the more conventional shows. An instance is the presentation of a brief dramatic offering dealing with life in New York city’s underworld, entitled “The Frame Up.”
Schenectady Gazette (New York), October 18, 1921
Passing Revue.
Beautiful girls in brilliant array, coupled with live wire funmakers go to make up the “Passing Revue,” which will be the big card in the Van Curler opera house Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Jim Bennett, Ada Lum, and Mark Linder and company in the playlet “The Frame Up,’ a police and underworld story are features. There is also Rose Hemley, Robetta Hall, Ray King, Lew Rice, Hal Hale and a chorus of exceptional ability.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), October 19, 1921
Van Curler
The management of the Van Curler opera house will offer tomorrow Friday and Saturday with daily matinees, a company known as the “Passing Revue.” One of the funmakers of the circuit Jim Bennett, will hold the comedy reins. One of the most attractive girls to be seen will be Ada Lum. Rose Hemley will also appear. Mark Linder and company will present a playlet, “The Frame Up,’ a story of police life and a study of characters awaiting sentence. King, Lew Rice, Speed Boy and Hal Hale complete the cast. Sixteen girls comprise the chorus.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), October 20, 1921

 
Schenectady Gazette (New York), October 22, 1921
Van Curler
I. H. Herk is the owner and producer of “The Passing Review,” which, with Jim Bennett and Ada Lum as the featured stars, is now playing a three-days engagement at the Van Curler opera house, with matinee today and tomorrow. Herk has not restricted his attraction exclusively to girls, important as he knows them to bee, but has also engaged a cast, furnished an environment, and supplied a background of tunes and jokes. Jim Bennett, described on the program as “a laugh purveyor extraordinary” has been installed as principal mirth instigator. Ada Lum, leading woman, renders Bennett strong support wherever required.
Oswego Daily Palladium (New York), October 25, 1921
The Passing Review at Richardson Theatre.
I. H. Herk, the owner and producer of The Passing Review, which, with Jim Bennett and Ada Lum as the featured members, comes to the Richardson Theatre, matinee and evening, announces his attraction as “a combination of feminine curve and current topic, theatrically interwoven.” “Thirty-six of them in that chorus of mine,” says Mr. Herk, “and any individual pair of them capable of supporting almost any kind of a business.” There is an exceptionally clever cast, with an environment of tasteful and harmonious color and tone, and a back ground of tunes easy to whistle and jokes easy to laugh at and recall. Jim Bennett has been installed as principal mirth instigator. Ada Lum, a handsome and clever leading lady woman, renders Bennett strong support.

 
Niagara Falls Gazette (New York), October 26, 1921

 
Niagara Falls Gazette (New York), October 27, 1921
Burlesque—Friday
The Passing Revue with Jim Bennett and Ada Lum, will play a two-day engagement at the International starting tomorrow night. This is a new show on the American Burlesque circuit but it comes here highly recommended as a dazzling attraction with a wealth of pretty girls, wonderful costumes and excellent musical numbers together with a rare line of clever comedy.

The Saturday afternoon matinees are proving very popular this season, doubly so as the the special admission price for ladies is honored only at the Saturday mat. Tickets are now on sale.

 
Niagara Falls Gazette (New York), October 28, 1921
 

Buffalo Courier (New York), October 30, 1921


Passing Revue Is Academy’s Burlesque Show
I. H. Herk’s has been the guiding hand in the preparation of the current edition of “The Passing Review,” at the Academy’s show for the coming week.

As the title suggests, the entertainment presented is of a “review” nature, with current topics of public interest as the selected themes. Even drama and serious drama too, is permitted its inning—but the inning is a brief one. “The Frame Up,” a dramatic episode of underworld life, from the pen of Mark Linder and in which Linder assumes the leading role, is an incident of the second act.

Jim Bennett, Hebrew comedian, is the principal laugh inciter of Mr. Herk’s organization, and as he is also said to be responsible, at least in part, for the “book,” it is but natural to believe he has fitted himself with satisfactory material. Bennett’s capabilities are too well known to patrons of burlesque to require any advance eulogies.

The cast is headed by Miss Ada Lum, than whom, it is claimed, there is no cleverer woman in burlesque. Others are Ray King, a pleasing and smooth-working “straight man”; Mark Linder, a virile character actor; Lew Rice, dapper, dancing juvenile; Rose Hemley, a pretty and dashing soubrette; Bobetta Hall, a smiling, winsome ingenue, and a chorus of vivacious youngsters, warranted by the management to keep any show buzzing along at top speed.

The next attraction will be “Parisian Flirts.”
Detroit Times (Michigan), November 3, 1921
Jim Bennett, Detroit Favorite, Coming Here
“The Passing Review,” with Jim Bennett, for five years leading comedian at the Avenue theater, returns to that house Sunday afternoon for a week’s stay as leading man of “The Passing Review,” said to be one of the most popular shows of the American burlesque wheel. Ada Lum, a Detroit girl, is also in the company’s cast.
Detroit Times (Michigan), November 5, 1921


Milwaukee Journal (Wisconsin), December 18, 1921


Milwaukee Journal (Wisconsin), December 23, 1921

Only Chinese Woman in Burlesque
Miss Ada Lum, the only Chinese woman in burlesque, is playing this week with The Passing Review at the Gayety theater. Ada doesn’t look a bit Chinese, does she?
Indiana Daily Times (Indianapolis, Indiana), December 31, 1921
 
 
Cincinnati Post (Ohio), January 13, 1922
In Burlesque
Empress: Jim Bennett, comedian star; Ada Lum, Chinese-American prima donna, and Bobetta Hall, Walnut Hills beauty, are the trio of stars in the “Passing Review,” which opens for a week’s engagement at the Empress Sunday afternoon. Also in the cast are Rose Hemley, Mark Linder, Ray King and Lew Rice. “The Frame-Up” is a novelty feature. the chorus is said to be unusually attractive.
Cincinnati Post (Ohio), January 16, 1922
In Burlesque
Empress—“The Frame Up,” dramatic sketch of the underworld starring Mark Linder, stands out conspicuously in “The Passing Review,” at the Empress this week. The show is above the average in burlesque. Jim Bennett, chief fun maker, keeps the audience in an uproar. The feminine contingent is headed by Misses Rose Hemley, Barbetta Hall and Ada Lum, who are exceptionally good looking.
Minneapolis Star (Minnesota), March 11, 1922
Gayety Manager William Koenig’s Gayety stock burlesque company has completed rehearsals on the third week’s attraction and Jim Bennett, chief comedian and producer, will be assisted by a galaxy of recognized stars of burlesque. Miss Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna, who entered burlesque after several seasons in musical comedy and vaudeville, is prima donna of the company, having replaced Miss Lillian Edbrooke, while Ray King, clever straight man has replaced Ray Edbrooke, who opened the stock season as leading man with the Koenig company.
Niagara Falls Gazette (New York), March 24, 1922


Plain Dealer (Ohio), May 16, 1922
Much Talent in Star Production
“Some Show,” which reopened the Star theater Saturday night, contains more talent than is usually offered by a burlesque production. There are eight principals and a beauty chorus of twenty-four girls. For a hurriedly put together attraction it is unusually good.

Miss Ada Lum, billed as the “Chinese American” prima donna, is more than a singer. She is a comedienne of uncommonly magnetic personality. Some years ago she was engaged in stock at the same theater and gained a large following.

In addition to Miss Lum, principal parts were taken by Jessie MacDonald, a sprightly ingenue who puts pep in the chorus, and Dolly Winters, a soubrette who is also of the lively kind.

Micky Markwood, Ray Read and Lee Hickman lead the comedy. This is a really funny trio and their humor is well worked up by the efforts of George Puget, an imposing straight man. Harry Seamon has a juvenile role.

The music and costuming of the production are above par, and the chorus changes are numerous enough to please everybody. The Star, under new management, will remain open indefinitely.
Plain Dealer (Ohio), May 19, 1922

 
Plain Dealer (Ohio), May 21, 1922
Star—“Flappers’ Frolic” is the title of this week’s production at the Star. Among the principals of the company are Ada Lum, prima donna; Grace Goodale, soubrette; Mabel Clark, comedienne, and Jessie MacDonald, ingenue. Johnny Crosby, billed as the “Caruso of Burlesque,” has been engaged as an added attraction. Comedy roles will be handled by Micky Markwood, Lee Hickman and Ray Read. George Puget will play the leading straight male role. …


Plain Dealer (Ohio), May 23, 1922
“Flappers’ Frolic” is Bill at the Star
The “Flappers Frollic” at the Star this week shows the smoothing off and rounding out of one of the best stock burlesque organizations ever formed in Cleveland.

The addition of Mabel Clark and Johnny Crosby to the cast of principals has added strength both in comedy and good singing. Crosby has a good tenor voice. “Who’ll Be the Next One to Cry Over You” is one of his outstanding numbers.

Miss Clark has an excellent and especially well costumed number in “Susquehanna Shore.” Miss Clark is a comedienne of ability and has a stage personality which always makes fiends.

Included in the cast of principals are Ada Lum, prima donna. Grace Goodale is a lively ingenue, and Jessie MacDonald.

The comedy is furnished by Lee Hickman, Ray Read, a diminutive comedian who doesn’t steep to rough tactics to get the laughs, and Micky Markwood of circus fame. George Puget in the straight role brings out all the laughs possible in the production.

The chorus of twenty dancing and singing girls is well costumed and trained.
Billboard, May 27, 1922
Ada Lum Addresses Cleveland City Council
Cleveland., O., May 16.—Ada Lum, leading lady of the stock burlesque company holding forth at the Star Theater, gained wide recognition by an address before the Cleveland city council.

Miss Lum said she was interested in public affairs and asked a chance to speak. Council unanimously voted to suspend the regular order of business and the demure little lady straight-way got to her feet and said she liked Cleveland and hoped Cleveland would like her. In conclusion she invited the city solons to take in the show at the Star, and most of them availed themselves of the opportunity.

It was s corking good stunt and got a big play in all the dailies.
Plain Dealer (Ohio), May 28, 1922
Star—“Frolics of Jack and Jill” is the title of this week’s production at the Star. The beauty chorus, which has become one of the outstanding features of the entertainments presented by this summer burlesque organization, will again be seen in this week’s show.

In the cast are Ada Lum, Jessie MacDonald, Grace Goodale, Lee Hickman, Micky Markwood and Ray Read. …
Plain Dealer (Ohio), May 31, 1922
Blackface Team Makes Hit at Star Theater
If there is one outstanding feature of the bill at the Star this week it is the work of a team working in blackface, Clarence Satchell and George Grimm. They have some original stuff and some of their work, especially that of satchel recalls the days of McIntyre and Heath in “The Ham Tree.” They received a cordial reception.

The next most appreciated part of the show was the opening of the second part in which the curtain went up on a bare stage. It developed that the company was in the audience and was somewhat reluctant upon “going on.” The part might have been placed to better advantage at the opening of the first part, inasmuch as the girls go through a rehearsal scene. As it is the number goes over good.

In addition to Satchell and Grimm several other principals of merit again appear, including Ada Lum, Grace Goodale, Jessie MacDonald, Micky Markwood, Lee Hickman and George Puget. The latter, a straight man, makes his first appearance as a character man in this show and does it fairly well.

The song numbers are fast and the costuming up to the standard of summer burlesque. The Cleopatra number would probably go over better with more appropriate scene setting.

The beauty chorus continues to popular favor.
Beacon Daily Herald (New York), August 23, 1922


Paragon Theatre
To-morrow night another vaudeville triumph will be presented at the State Theatre.

One of the most pleasing announcements is that Ada Lum, the only Chinese-American dramatic actress, supported by a clever cast, will grace the bill the last half of this week with the absorbing French comedy drama, “Man and the Law,” a very clever one act playlet. …
Beacon Daily Herald (New York), August 24, 1922


Perth Amboy Evening News (New Jersey), September 2, 1922

 
Perth Amboy Evening News (New Jersey), September 5, 1922
 

The Sun (Baltimore, Maryland), November 7, 1922
Palace—
To those who appreciate the higher class of burlesque the offering this week, Al Reeves Beauty Show, is recommended. From start to finish the entire production shows the skill for which Al Reeves is famous. George Ward and Lee Hickman are comedians of unusual merit. Hilda Giles, Eleanor Marshall, Ada Lum and Edith Murray vie for honors in the leading female roles. The All-American Trio pleased with songs. In Frankie and Johnnie, a team of negro dancers, the producer has discovered an extremely clever pair of headliners. All [sic] Reeves himself presents a few minutes of light repartee over the footlights.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 8, 1922
Gayety—“Reeves’ Beauty Show.”
Thirty years a producer and twenty years heading his own show in Columbia burlesque is the record Al Reeves will celebrate with his appearances twice daily at the Gayety Theater next week, commencing Sunday afternoon.

“Reeves’ Beauty Show” is described as an all-new organization this year, with six changes of scenes and nine complete outfits of costuming for the chorus featured. George Ward is principal comedian and Hilda Giles, the soubrette. From musical comedy comes Ada Lum, Edith Murray and Elinor Marshall to display the Al Reeves idea of beauty. There will be specialties by the American Trio. Ward and Wilson, Lee Hickman and Al Reeves, with his banjo and his “Give Me Credit” songolog.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 12, 1922
Gayety—Reeves’ Beauty Show.
Al Reeves celebrates his thirties year as a producer and twentieth as an exponent of the Columbia brand of burlesque with this season’s presentation of his “Beauty Show,” which opens at the Gayety Theater with a matinee today for a week’s engagement.

While retaining the general character of burlesque, Reeves’ “Beauty Show” is heralded as new in all things but the title—new scenery, new costumes and an entire roster of principals and chorus girls new to the Columbia wheel. Vaudeville specialties, numerous ensembles in songs and dance, with pretty women in stylish garb to gladden the eye, are features.

George Ward and Hilda Giles, the featured players, in a newly devised idea of singing and dancing comedy effects; the All-American trio, who feature harmony; Ada Lum, prima donna, and Lee Hickman, character actor, will offer vaudeville specialties which include Al Reeves, with his banjo and “Give Me Credit” number. Assisting Reeves in the main elements of comedy will be George Ward. From musical comedy, Elinor Marshall, Miss Lum and Edith Murray come as leaders of the feminine contingent. Six sets of special scenery are carried and nine complete changes of costumes will be worn by the chorus girls.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 13, 1922
Gayety.
“Al Reeves’ Beauty Show”
A fair array of burlesque talent cavorts on the Gayety stage this week under the name of “Al Reeves’ Beauty Show.” Al Reeves is appearing personally in the show, doing a light repartee—as the program says.

The Beauty Show also features George Ward and Hilda Giles. Ward is a new recruit as a burlesque comedian, but he manages to do fairly well with the comedy he has to work with. As for Miss Giles, she is a peppy soubrette, sings her song numbers well and scored a decisive hit with George Ward.

It must be said that the comedy numbers of the Reeves’ show are very weak and some of them very oid. Lee Hickman does a very good comedy character and all of his scenes were good. The Marks Brothers, Lew and Bert, are well placed in the current show and although their song repertoire is rather old, they amuse as well as any other performer. Nick Vitale, too, helps the Marks boys with his voice.

Ada Lum, Edith Murray and Elinor Marshall are members of the cast and they lend their voices to the charm and beauty which Reeves has secured for his show.

Reeves does practically the same act as he did last year. He retains much of his pep and ability as a banjoist, and that part of his act is good, but his chatter could certainly be improved upon. H. K.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 14, 1922
Gayety—“Al Reeves’ Beauty Show.”
The Reeves’ show this year has a cast of performers quite new to the patrons of the Gayety Theater, but they lost very little time last night in making themselves acquainted and popular. The show itself is fairly good entertainment, being arranged in such a manner that it gradually works the audience into a syate of enthusiasm, reaching a climax with the specialty offered by Edith Murray, and then it goes “flop”—Al Reeves comes on with his long familiar chatter that may have been amusing at one time—but that was long, long ago. His chief slogan, however, has Peen adopted by the European friends of Uncle Sam—“Give Me Credit.”

The honors of the show belong, beyond question, to Edith Murray, whose songs and dances brought round after round of applause until she had to stop owing to the lack of songs. Hilda Giles is a lively soubrette with a pleasing personality. Her songs were well received, her specialty with George Ward making one of the hits of the show. Eleanor Marshall and Ada Lum complete the feminine cast.

George Ward and Bee Hickman are the comedians and their work as a whole was good, although some of their material is a little moss-grown. A trio composed of the Marks brothers, Lew and Bert, and Nick Vitale, provide the harmonizing usually looked for in a burlesque production. Arthur Putnam is a good straight man.

The chorus measures up to the Reeves’ standard of pulchritude and liveliness.
Monitor (Omaha, Nebraska), January 21, 1923
Johnnie Nit with Al Reeves
Geatest [sic] Dancer in Show Business at the Gayety Next Week.
Al Reeves celebrates his thirtieth year as a producer and his twentieth year as an exponent of the Columbia brand of burlesque with this season’s presentation of ihs [sic] “Beauty Show”. He comes to the popular Gayety theatre for the week starting Saturday matinee, with what he declares to be the best entertainment he has ever given. As the public has come to depend upon Reeves to fulfill his promise there is advance assurance of an enjoyable display twice daily with Reeves marshalling [sic] his hosts.

While retaining the general character of accepted burlesque Reeves’ Beauty Show is heralded as new in all things but the title, new scenery, new costumes and an entire roster of principals and chorus new to the Columbia wheel. Vaudeville specialties of novel character, numerous ensembles in songs and dance with pretty women in stylish garb to gladden the eye have always been features, typical of the Al Reeves’ entertainments.

George Ward and Hilda Giles, the featured players in a newly devised idea of singing and dancing comedy effects; the All-American Trio, eccentric entertainers who feature harmony; Ada Lum, prima donna, Lee Hickman, character delineator, are vaudeville features that would not be completely placed without Al Reeves with his banjo and “Give Me Credit” song.

Assisting Reeves in the main elements of comedy that flash through the burlesque scenes George Ward will be featured in his individual style of merrymaking. From musical comedy Elinore Marshall, Miss Lum and Edith Murray come to assume their station as leaders of the feminine contingent that is always an important factor in the Reeves shows.

It is declared that the “Beauty Show” has been given every possible scenic, and sartorial embellishment that the Reeves’ standard has always called for in burlesque equipment. Six sets of special scenery are carried and nine complete changes of costume will be worn by the chorus girls with the principal women going in for a proportionate show of style in dress.

Sunday’s matinee starts at 3:00.

Two of the greatest dancers in the colored race—Johnnie Nit and Mary Tuck—are strongly featured on the long program.
Omaha Bee (Nebraska), January 21, 1923
Al Reeves celebrates his 30th year as a producer and his 20th year as an exponent of burlesque with this season’s presentation of his  “Beauty Show.” He comes to the Gayety theater for the current week with daily matinee.

George Ward and Hilda Giles are the featured players in a new idea of singing and dancing comedy effects; the All-American Trio, eccentric entertainers, feature harmony; Ada Lum, prima donna, Lee Hickman, character delineator, are vaudeville features, and Al Reeves with his banjo and “Give Me Credit” song. Assisting Reeves in the elements of comedy George Ward will be featured in his individual style of merrymaking. From musical comedy Elinore Marshall, Miss Lum and Edith Murray come to assume their station as leaders of the feminine contingent that is always an important factor in the Reeves show. Six sets of special scenery are carried and nine complete changes of costume will be worn by the chorus girls. Today’s matinee starts at 3.

 
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), January 21, 1923
Gayety—Burlesque
They tell stories and dance in “Al Reeve’s Beauty Show,” current attraction at the Gayety theater. Some of the jokes are new, and others are revived for the occasion. For instance, there’s the one about the street car figuring in a military accident—running over a peanut and killing two colonels.

Edith Murray is a soubrette who appears in a number of songs which were rendered with considerable laughter—by the singer. Ada Lum, dark and attractive, was the applause hit of the production.

The chief comedian of the production is Lee Hickman, who is a Seward, Neb., boy, and who wears a red vest and red tie. One of the interlocutors says that his throat is cut.

Al Reeves is the head of the show, and this is his thirty-firth [sic] year.

Mr. and Mrs. Johnnie Nit, colored dancers, won the approbation of their auditors with soft shoe numbers that were fast, furious and capable.

The show continues the week to Friday, inclusive, with matinee today.
Omaha Bee (Nebraska), January 24, 1923
Al Reeves’ Beauty Show is on this week at “Old Man” Johnson’s popular center of mirth and melody. Arthur Putnam wants to produce burlesque on the Columbia “Wheel”; Lee Hickman’s ambition is to keep out of the Actors Fund Home for the Aged; Edith Murray would possess her own home in Florida; Elinore Marshall wants to play “Juliet’” Ada Lum would found a school of cooking. Ladies’ matinee at 2:15 daily.
Milwaukee Journal (Wisconsin), February 4, 1923
Al Reeves’ Beauty Show, which opens Sunday matinee for a week of two performances daily at the Gayety, benefits by Al’s 30 years experience in formulating popular entertainment. There is no separating Reeves from his bank, from his Give Me Credit oddities and his personal command of his chorus beauties in representations of famous paintings. Reeves will, as usual, be “all over the show.” Edith Murray, queen of jazz, Lee Hickman, character comedian, and Arthur Putnam, will be leading principals. Elinor Marshall and Ada Lum are recruits from musical comedy who will display charms as principals in various scenes. Marks, Tally and Marks, singing, talking and eccentric trio, the Reeves brand of chorus girls, nine complete changes of chorus costumes, new scenery in six sets are announced. Then, too, there will be Johnnie Nit and Mary Tuck to show their speed and class as dusky entertainers, offered as extra added attractions in a already big aggregation of talent.


Detroit Times (Michigan), March 1, 1923
Al Reeves’ “Beauty Show” for Gayety
Al Reeves comes to the Gayety theater for the week starting Sunday matinee for two daily presentations of his “Beauty Show.” Reeves has been contributing Columbia burlesque to public entertainment for 20 years and ten years earlier he was a “Free lance.” He declares that this year’s show is the best he has ever produced. With his faithful banjo and his popular “Give Me Credit” whimsies, the producer heads his won company. Edith Murray, “Queen of Jazz”; Marks, Tally and Marks eccentric comedians, singers and dancers; Ada Lum, sweet-voiced prima donna; Lee Hickman, character comedian, and Elinor Marshall, dainty ingenue are in the cast.
Morning Telegraph (New York), March 18, 1923
Where Burlesque Changes Weekly
“The Beauty Revue” will be given at the Star Theatre, Brooklyn, tomorrow afternoon. Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna, has the principal feminine part, while Jimmie Cooper leads the comedians into action.
Utica Observer-Dispatch (New York), April 1, 1923


New York Clipper, May 16, 1923
Gerard Signs Many
The cast signed so far for Barney Gerard for his “All in Fun” show on the Columbia Circuit next season includes Will Fox, Harry Kohler, Jack McSorley, Eddie Green, Murray and Irwin, and Ada Lum. He has also signed Harry Kilby for one of his shows. He will call his other new show “Vanity.” The cast will remain the same in the “Follies of the Day” as is now playing in Boston
Jewish Chronicle (Newark, New Jersey), August 17, 1923
Miner’s Empire
Sixteen musical numbers are promised as part of the many attractive features of Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” revue at Miner’s Empire Theater next week for the opening of the season Sunday evening, August 10, the author being none other than Billy Baskette, said to have written one thousand popular songs. Will Fox and Harry Koler, two headline recruits from vaudeville, head the list, which includes Ada Lum, Anna Propp, Kalama, Jack McSorley, Murray and Irwin and Eddie Green. …
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), September 16, 1923
Gayety
“All in Fun,” Barney Gerard’s new revue, is the main attraction at the Gayety Theatre this week, with Will Fox and Harry Koler as the comedians heading the list of principals. They are supported by Ada Lum, the Chinese-American singer; Anna Propp, soubrette; Kalama, the South Sea dancer who has been compared to Gilda Gray, and Murray and Irwin. The rest of the cast comprises Matty White, formerly of White and Beck; Jack McCorley [sic] and Eddie Green. Sixteen musical numbers complete the program.
Brooklyn Daily Eagle (New York), October 14, 1923


The Casino.
“All in Fun” is the attraction at the Casino. Will Fox and Harry Koler head the list of principals, which includes Ada Lum, Anna Propp, Kalama, Jack McSorley, Matty White, Murray and Irwin and Eddie Green.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 7, 1923
Gayety—“All in Fun.”
Barney Gerard, the producer, says it’s “All In Fun” next week at the Gayety, beginning with Sunday matinee, with a show of sixteen musical numbers of the jingly, haunting variety, and stage settings stupendous and magnificent. Will Fox and Harry Koler will head the cast: little “Dresden China” Anna Propp is the soubrette, Ada Lum prima donna, Jack McSorley the straight-man. and Murray and Irwin, together with Eddie Green, a blackface comedian, complete the cast. There is also a large chorus of girls, with beauty, pep and talent. An important feature will be Oriental Kalama, the shivering beauty; who comes to burlesque from vaudeville.

“All in Fun” is claimed to be a big show of many originalities pleasing to both the men and women folks looking for an enjoyable evening’s entertainment.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 11, 1923


Evening Star (Washington, DC), November 13, 1923
Gayety—“All in Fun.”
An unheralded performer stepped out and made a hit of the show at the Gayety Theater last night. It was Matty White, a comedian with an odd get-up, some new songs and a good deal of talent. He will go farther.

The show is one of Barney Gerard’s concoctions of songs, dances and nonsense, entitled “All on Fun,” and is well named. Will Fox and Harry Koler are comical as two lawyers who are dodging the police almost continually. The show carries one of the liveliest little soubrettes in burlesque in Anna Propp, a sort of vest pocket edition of femininity, but at that one who does not need the aid of the spotlight to draw attention. Momi Kalama (that might be her real name, but you can use your own judgment) puts on several dances after the fashion of a well known Broadway cabaret performer and does them well. Ada Lum is good as the prima donna. …
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), November 25, 1923


Morning Telegraph (New York), December 1, 1923
U-Notes
“All in Fun,” featuring Will Fox and Harry Koler at the Gayety, week of November 19, proved to be a very interesting show. One of the funniest scenes transpired within the law office of Jake Slotkin Fox and Abram Slitktn Koler, Hebrew attorneys, who handle cases with such swift dispatch that it makes our courts seem as slow as a snail with sore feet in comparison. Ada Lum, youthfully beautiful prima donna, was most pleasing to both eye and ear. Miss Lum, often advertised as the Chinese-American prima donna, is the daughter of Dr. Chuck Lum, a prominent Chinese physician in New Orleans. She was educated in a girl’s seminary, studying voice culture and making her debut as a chorus girl about five years ago. …
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), January 27, 1924
Gayety—“All in Fun”
Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” is at the Gayety this week.

The show is in two acts and ten scenes. The interior of a jail in one scene in [sic] transformed into an oriental palace of regal splendor before the very eyes of the astonished audience.

The cast of fun makers is headed by Will Fox and Harry Koler, who are adequately supported by such stage satellites as Anna Propp, the tiniest soubrette in Columbia burlesque; Matty White, who comes from the Keith vaudeville field; Ada Lum, Chinese-American prima donna; Momi Kalama, a dancer of South Sea evolutional Murray and Irwin, two very clever entertainers; Jack McSorley, a fashion plate straight man, and Eddie Green, a colored performer, late star of“Platation Days.”

There are sixteen jingly musical numbers written by Billy Beskette, the noted composer of hundreds of popular songs.

The smartly gowned and youthful chorus will show in its personnel the vast experience of Mr. Gerard, the producer of “All in Fun.” …

Gayety—Burlesque
So many good shows have been contributed to Columbia burlesque by Barney Bernard, that one naturally expects “All in Fun” at the Gayety this week, to be good.

“All in Fun” is more of a farce comedy than is usual in regulation burlesque offerings and the adventures of “Slitkin and Slotkin” give Will Fox and Harry Koler abundant opportunity to display their talents as comedians.

Momi Kalama, ingenue and classic dancer; Ada Lum, statuesque and beautiful prima donna, and Ann Prop [sic], comedienne and agile dancer, are leaders of a singing and dancing contingent that will win the good will and applause of any audience.

Matty White, the “Singing Humoresque,” formerly on the Keith circuit, contributes the most attractive number on the program, when he sings “I Thought I’d die.”

There is an abundance of beautiful scenery and stunning costumes and the caption “All in Fun” is well placed, for comedy and laughter predominate.

Today’s matinee begins at 3 o’clock.
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), January 28, 1924
Gayety—Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” at the Gayety presents an ensemble of youthful beauties who are arrayed in the very last word in costumes, with a pleasing array of silks and satins fashioned in the latest style. And there is a cast in which speed and ability are the watchwords. The show is headed by Will Fox and Harry Koler, and includes Anna Propp, Matty White, Ada Lum, Kalama, Jack McSorley, Murray and Irwin, Eddie Greed and Joe Murphy.
Times-Union (Albany, New York), March 5, 1924
Columbia Burlesque
A multitude of enjoyable features will make a worth while visit by local theatergoers to Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” at the Hall Thursday, Friday and saturday with daily matinees. This offering which is just as fun-laden as its title suggests, will offer splendid amusement to all who see it at either the night performance of the daily matinees now so popular with the ladies.

The array of talent is headed by Will Fox and Harry Koler, who are adequately supported by such stage satellites as Anna Propp, the tiniest and peppiest soubrette in Columbia burlesque; Ada Lum, Chinese American prima donna; Momi Kalama, a dancer of South Sea evolutions on the Gilda Grey order; Murray and Irwin, two very clever entertainers; Jack McSorley, a fashion-plate straight man, and Eddie Green, a colored performer, and a creator of a new line of song monologue, and Joe Murphy, a nifty stepper.
Buffalo Evening News (New York), March 11, 1924
Gayety—Burlesque
“All in Fun” is the production at the Gayety theater this week and it furnishes real amusement. Barney Gerard is author of the production. The show borders on musical comedy and is well presented. Will Fox and Harry Koler are still the comedian lawyers, just as they were in vaudeville. Others in the cast are: Anna Propp, Matty White, Ada Lum, Momi Kalama, Jack McSorley, Eddie Green, and the singing and dancing pair Murray and Irwin. The music is good and the chorus consists of a lively bunch of girls.
Auburn Citizen (New York), March 20, 1924
At the Auditorium
Barney Gerard says his new revue All in Fun, next Monday’s offering at The Auditorium matinee and night is really “all in fun” and, from news of the show that comes from other cities, this astute producer has only modestly described the show. While it bubbles over with bright comedy in every one of its 10 magnificent scenes, it also furnishes an abundance of songs and dances and an amazing array of gorgeous gowns. It also offers a really “all star” cast of which Will Fox and Harry Koler are the featured members, they being adequately assisted by Anna Propp as soubrette, Kalama, a South Sea Isle dancer of the Gilda Grey type; Matty White, the “Humoresque Singer;” Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna; Jack McSorley, Murray and Irwin and Eddie Green, a colored singer and dancer and Joe Murphy.

Tuesday’s Rochester papers in speaking of All in Fun, which is now appearing at the Gayety Theater in that city, says that it is the best musical comedy that has visited Rochester this season. Seats will be on sale at The Auditorium Saturday morning.


Binghamton Press (New York), March 24, 1924
“All in Fun”
Barney Gerard says, “It’s ‘All in Fan,’” and the two audiences at the Stone opera house Wednesday matinee and night will have the opportunity to take the producer of “Follies of the Day” at his word and laugh almost continually in the enjoyment of the newest Gerard, production. “All in Fun” is well titled, for comedy is the ruling motive of the adventures of “Slitkin and Slotkin” as detailed in merry moods by Will Fox and Harry Koler. Music and dance, song and story, comedy scenes and spectacular pictures and stage novelties fill the performance with appealing realism. One of the big hits is Matty White, “the singing humoresque,” who comes direct from the Keith circuit. Pretty girls are the rule and not the exception in the chorus, and in Ada Lum, prima donna, one of the most beautiful girls in burlesque is disclosed. Anna Propp, a peppy and tireless dancer, and Momi Kalama, a pretty ingenue who dances unusually well, are other girls conspicuous for their adaptability to essential roles in the many diverting scenes of mirth and melody. “All in Fun” is a good show, creditable to Barney Gerard, who has brought to Columbia Burlesque some of its best offerings.


Elmira Star-Gazette (New York), March 25, 1924
“All in Fun”
William Fox and Harry Koler, so popular as headliners in Keith and Orpheum vaudeville, head the all star cast in “All in Fun” coming to the Lyceum this afternoon and evening, while others in the big stellar aggregation worthy of special mention are Anna Propp, Matty White, Ada Lum, Kalama, Jack McSorley, Murray and Irwin, Eddie Green, and Joe Murphy. The book of the piece is a rollicking vehicle of comedy from start to finish with a laugh in every line and situation. It is also well supplied with melodies as Billy Baskette, the well-known author of countless popular songs, has furnished the sixteen musical numbers that frequently interrupt the funmaking.
Utica Observer-Dispatch (New York), March 27, 1924

 
Schenectady Gazette (New York), April 3, 1924
Van Curler
Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun”
Described as the “greatest laughing show in burlesque,” Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” will come to the Van Curler for the first three days of next week. Barney Gerard is also the producer of “Follies of the Day,” a show on the Columbia wheel which played in Schenectady earlier this season. Attractions heralded in “All in Fun” include Murray and Irwin, billed as “two nifty steppers”; Kalama, the South Sea dancer; Ada Lum, Chinese-American prima donna; Eddie Green, late star on “Plantation Days,” and a typical Gerard chorus.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), April 4, 1924
Van Curler
Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun”
There is a farce comedy plot to Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” revue coming to the Van curler theater next week. The story has to do with the adventures of two comedians, who after taking a three months’ law course, set up business without obtaining a diploma or license. This causes many funny complications ending with the embryo lawyers being thrown in jail. The judge, who is to try all the prisoners in the jail, is delayed and one of the comedians is appointed in his place. This results in many situations which are claimed to keep the audience in continuous roars of laughter. Will Fox and Harry Koler, two ex-vaudeville headliners, are the comedy lawyers, while others who contribute to the general fun are Anna Propp, Matty White, Ada Lum, Jack McSorley, Kalama, the South Sea dancer; Murray and Irwin, Eddie Green, Joe Murphy and others. Throughout the piece weaves a chorus of girls. There are ten magnificent stage settings including a transformation of a jail into an Oriental palace in full view of the audience. Barney Gerard, who produced “All in Fun,” also presents in Columbia burlesque “Vanities” and “Follies of the Day.”
Schenectady Gazette (New York), April 5, 1924
Van Curler
Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun”
Will Fox and Harry Koler, popular headliners in Keith and Orpheum vaudeville, head the cast in “All in Fun” coming to the Van Curler theater for the first three days of next week, while others in the aggregation worthy of special mention are Anna Propp, Matty White, Ada Lum, Chinese-American prima donna; Kalama, the South Sea dancer; Jack Sorley [sic], Murray and Irwin, “two nifty steppers;” Eddie Green and Joe Murphy. The book of the piece, as its name suggests, is a rollocking vehicle of comedy from start to finish. It is also well supplied with melodies as Billy Baskette, the well-known author of countless popular songs, has furnished the 16 musical numbers that frequently interrupt the fun-making. Of the ones that are most popular with the audiences the following may be mentioned: “One Little Girl,” “I Want a Husband,” “Two Kissable Lips,” “Tell the Rose,” “Office Blues,” “On Your Toes,” “Lockstep Glide,” “Dancing at the Barbecue,” “Egyptian Blues,” “Wedding Ring,” “Highball” and “Oriental Maid.” There is a host of girls in the many chorus numbers. Patrons of Columbia burlesque will identify Barney Gerard, who produced “All in Fun” as the same producer who presents “Follies of the Day” and “Vanities” in this season’s list.


Times-Union (Albany, New York), April 5, 1924
Columbia Burlesque
A multitude of enjoyable features will make a worth while visit by local theatergoers to Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun” at the Hall Thursday, Friday and Saturday with daily matinees. This offering which is just as fun-laden as its title suggests, will offer splendid amusement to all who see it at either the night performances of the daily matinees now so popular with the ladies.

The array of talent is headed by Will Fox and Harry Koler, who are adequately supported by such stage satellites as Anna Propp, the tiniest and peppiest soubrette in Columbia burlesque; Ada Lum, Chinese American prima donna; Momi Kalama, a dancer of South Sea evolutions on the Gilda Grey order; Murray and Irwin, two very clever entertainers; Jack McSorley, a fashion-plate straight man, and Eddie Green, a colored performer, and a creator of a new line of song monologue, and Joe Murphy, a nifty stepper.
Schenectady Gazette (New York), April 7, 1924

 
Schenectady Gazette (New York), April 8, 1924

 
Times-Union (Albany, New York), April 9, 1924
Hall Burlesque
A prediction is made by those who have seen “All in Fun,” next sidesplitting revue at the Hall, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with daily matinee, that the ladies who can attend the daily matinees especially designed for them, will leave the theatre in wondering admiration of the marvelous costumes and scenic effects. And it is also confidently predicted that they will rave over the pep of Anna Propp, the cultured performance of Ada Lum, the Chinese-American prima donna; the wonderful dancing of Kalama, and the comedy of Will Fox and Harry Kolen [sic].
Times-Union (Albany, New York), April 10, 1924
“All in Fun” at Hall
There are no buxom spear carriers or cotton tights in Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun,” due at the Hall today and Saturday, with daily matinees. Instead there is said to be an ensemble to youthful beauties arrayed in the last word in costumes with a pleasing array of silks and satins fashioned in the latest style. This aggregation is head by Will Fox and Harry Koler, and includes Anna Propp, Momi Kalami [sic], Ada Lum, Jack McSorley, Murray and Irwin, Eddie Green and Joe Murphy.
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), April 15, 1924
Waldron’s Casino
“All in Fun,” the burlesque show at Waldron’s Casino this week, proved itself to be well named by providing laughter for nearly two hours yesterday. The producer is Barney Gerard, creator of “Follies of the Day” and “Vanities.” Will Fox and Harry Koler delighted the audiences with their comedy and antics, performed in bewildering succession. Music was furnished by Ada Lum, Chinese prima donna, who has learned to sing American jazz. Others who contributed to the show were Matty White, singing comedian; Momi Kalama, South Sea Island dancer; Murray and irwin, Jack McSorley, Eddie Green and Joe Murphy. In addition to the burlesque the program includes vaudeville and two photo plays, “Woman Proof,” with Thomas Meighan, and “Mothers-in-Law,” with an all-star cast.
Billboard, April 26, 1924
Columbia Burlesque
“All in Fun”
A “Columbia Burlesque” attraction, featuring Will Fox and Harry Koler. Written by Barney Gerard. Songs by Billy Baskette and Edgar Dowell. Dances by Walter Brooks. Entire production produced and presented by Barney Gerard week of April 21.

The Cast—Will Fox, Harry Koler, Jack MeSorley, Marty White, Bobby Irwin, Jack Murray, Anna Propp, Nell Hall, Ada Lum. Momi Kalama, E. L. Benn, Eddie Green.

Review

Part One—Scene one was a silk drape with heads of girls protruding. The girls step forth for a footlight lineup in song prolog.

Scene two was the interior of the office of Slitkin & Slotkin, lawyers, with Jack McSorley, a classy, clear-dictioned straight, seeking lawyers without a license; Bobby Irwin and Jack Murray, as eton-jacketed office boys; diminutive Anna Propp, bobbed brunet soubrette, as stenographer, backed by ten statuesque show girls, led in song by Momi Kalama, a dazzling blond ingenue, who joined the choristers in a dancing ensemble. Into this scene comes Marty White, a somewhat eccentric Dutch boob, as an inventor, who make a trio admirable. Ada Lum, a slender brunet, then comes in relative to a lost dog for a fast and funny cross-fire patter, and then come the comics, Will Fox as Slotkin and Harry Koler as Slitkin, in modified Hebrew makeup and mannerism that is likable, as the lawyers practicing without a license. Nell Hall, a plump brunet, seeking a lost husband, is followed by Irwin and Murray as the noisy burglars, and Eddie Green, a colored actor, as a porter. Ingenue Kalama then reappears as an operatic singer leading a prettily gowned ensemble in a rose song, followed by Green with a dance and Irwin and Murray in an orchestra aisle whistling the refrain to Ingenue Kalama’s lyrics, which is supplemented on stage by a bobbed brunet chorister, who was melodiously resonant in her whistling. Prima Lum, returning to seek the lawyers’ aid in finding her dog, is mistaken for the woman seeking her husband, and herein follows a laugh-evoking scene, in which the laugh-getting honors are divided between the comics and Prima Lum, who then break into song that brings on an ensemble placarded with hearts with the lyrics of Prima Lum’s song. The principals in fast and funny dialog led up to the reappearance of Soubret Propp in a jazz number that she jazzed up for continuous applause.

Scene three was a silk drape for Irwin and Murray in a classy dancing specialty that called for encores, which brought them back in grotesque bird makeup for a whistling flirtation.

Scene four was an elaborate country club set, with lighting and costuming effects apropos for Soubret Propp to put over her Russian dance, for which »he was rewarded with repeated encores. Joe Murray followed with a corkscrew dance that was out of the ordinary. Ingenue Kalama did a Hawaiian dance that was artistically and realistically classic. Eddie Green in song and dance followed with a comedy song that went over great and held up the show. The comics then reappeared in golf attire for a funny dialog. Then Comic Fox made good with parodies on pop numbers, followed by Soubret Propp and Juveniles Irwin and Murray as a singing and dancing trio. Then came Marty White in grotesque makeup and mannerism for a singing specialty in which bis facial registration and pantomimic gestures kept the audience convulsed with laughter. He responded to repeated encores until he tied the show in a knot that was only untied when he reappeared in the subsequent scene for a new lyric of a more serious trend, which led up to a musical comedy finale.

Part Two—Scene one was an elaborate Oriental set, with lighting and costuming effects apropos for Ingenue Kalama in dance, and the appearance on the throne of Prima Lum as queen, awaiting the arrival of lovers, who come in the person of Comics Fox and Koler in street-cleaners’ clean attire as tourists, followed by Marty White in ludicrous makeup for an original Oriental song.

Scene two was a King Tut drape for Nat Mortan as an added attraction, with a new selection of lyrics and his human clarinet vocalism for encores.

Scene three was the interior of a jail, with Straight McSworley as warden guarding the prisoners. Comics Fox and Koler and Eddie Green, who are entertained by Prima Lum and Soubret Propp dancing a la Shannan and McAllister in convict attire, during which diminutive Anna caused a wow by the falling of her lower stripes, and, let it be said to the credit of both Prima Lum and Soubret Propp, that they showed remarkable acting ability by turning the accident into laugh-evoking burlesque that could be continued as part of the show for laugh-evoking purposes unless it is already part of the show, and deceived us as cleverly as it did the other auditors. Koler, made Judge, metes out punishment to defendants, Prima Lum, the sleepwalker; Eddle Green, the card trickster; Ingenue Kalama the wife of Judge Koler, and finally his partner, Comic Fox, for practicing law without a license. During this scene Irwin and Murray again demonstrate their dancing ability, and the same is applicable to Eddie Green, likewise the Misses Darrington and Blair and the reappearance of Soubret Propp in full evening dress (male attire) as one of a trio in a dancing act with Irwin and Murray.

Scene four was a silk drape for Ingenue Kalama in song to herald the next scene.

Scene five was another elaborate set of black and white, with the feminine in gorgeous gowns of white for a wedding ceremony, in which the entire company took part in closing the show.

Comment—The scenery, gowning and costuming xostly and attractive in quality and quantity, the company individually and collectively clean and clever entertainers, who kept the auditors laughing and applauding thruout the entire show, which opens with the old Slitkin and Slotkin characters and business, but with many new lines and action which make for clever comedy. Comics Fox and Koler in their makeup and mannerism are admirable. Anna Propp works like a little trojan thruout the entire show. Prima Lum, with her stately, refined beauty, is not only a vocalist of the present-day prima type but an actress of ability in comedy scenes. Ingenue Kalama is personally attractive, and for an ingenue singing and dancing can outclass the most of them. Irwin and Murray are two exceptionally clever singing and dancing juveniles who will take their place among the leaders. Marty White is in a class by himself as an individual entertainer of exceptional talent and ability. Members of the chorus are there with pretty faces and slender, symmetrical forms, and all they lack is the inclination to smile, for in the country club scene they sat like manikins; otherwise it was a clever presentation of clean burlesque. Oh, yes, one of the most realistic characterizations in the show was one uniformed cop of E. L. Benn, who deserves special mention for his realism.
Standard Union (Brooklyn, New York), April 29, 1924
Barney Gerard’s “All in Fun,” revue displayed a beauty chorus and a number of features found only in high-class musical comedies when the production appeared last night at the Empire Theatre. The costumes worn were a revelation to the audience. Among those in the cast are William Fox and Harry Koler, Anna Propp, Matty White, Ada Lum, Kalaina, Jack MeSorley and Murray and Irwin.
Billboard, May 10, 1924


Times-Union (Albany, New York), September 20, 1924
Burlesque at Hall
Barney Gerard’s New Show, starring these two famous comedians, Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, reunited after several years at the Hall all next week, is said to be one of the funniest shows ever produced. Joseph K. Watson, who deserted burlesque two years ago to appear in the Keith vaudeville houses, established himself as a headliner with a huge following, and it took considerable persuasion on one hand and a liberal display of currency by Mr. Gerard on the other hand to induce Watson to return to burlesque. Mr. Gerard realizes what a formidable team Watson and Cohan makes for burlesque. They are heralded as the Weber and Fields of the present generation.

As Slitkin and Slotkin, real estate manipulators, the two comedians are provided with a number of excruciatingly funny scenes, written by Joseph K. Watson. The two sell lots that prove to be worthless and they get into a jam with the Revenue Department over their income tax. To further involve them, a determined woman pursues Slitkin and insists he fulfill his promise of marriage.

The entire production is up to the usual Barney Gerard standard and makes an admirable background to the efforts of the comedians and the ling list of entertainers. The cast includes such favorites as Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Elsa Lang, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson. The songs were written by Owen Murphy and Jay Gorpey, composers of many Broadway successes. The chorus of 20 pretty, shapely girls is well trained in dancing and ensembles. The attention of the ladies is particularly called to the gowns and costs worn by the feminine members of the company. All were designed by one of New York’s leading modistes, who recently returned from Paris. She has embodied the Parisian style in all of the costumes.
Times-Union (Albany, New York), September 22, 1924


Burlesque at Hall.
Barney Gerard presents this week for the approval of the patons of the Hall his latest contribution to burlesque, Barney Gerard’s New Show. Replete with good comedy, clever dialogue, catchy songs, tuneful music and a host of pretty girls, the show ranks with the best burlesque productions. Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan (here they are, together again) handle the comedy. These famous flunkers, who have appeared in recent years in several Slitkin and Slotkin roles, this season are real stage manipulators. Two years ago Watson deserted burlesque to appear at Keith vaudeville houses. With him back in burlesque, playing opposite his old partner, Cohan, theater-goers have a rare treat in store for them. These funmakers are heralded as the “Weber and Fields of the present generation.” As Slitkin and Slotkin, the two comedians are provided with a number of excruciatingly funny scenes, which were written by Mr. Watson, The two sell lots that prove to be worthless and get themselves mixed up in many humorous situations. The supporting cast includes Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Elsa Lang, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson. A chorus of pretty dancing maids helps to keep the show moving along at a rapid pace. Owen Murphy and Jay Gorney wrote the music for the show. Mr. Gerard personally supervised the staging of his production.

 
Times-Union (Albany, New York), September 25, 1924
 
 
Ada Lum at Hall
They say everybody has a hobby, yet most hobbies benefit the ones who possess them. The most unselfish hobby heard of in a long while is that from which Ada Lum, prima donna of Barney Gerard’s New Show at the Hall derives much pleasure. Miss Lum spent several months traveling through the Near East a few years ago and saw the sufferings of these destitute people. She realized that here in America thousands of pieces of wearing apparel are thrown away daily, while the poor children and grownups as well, in the stricken area are almost without food or clothing. Miss Lum collects the cast-off clothing of the members of the company and from her friends in the many cities she visits. She packs the clothing in large bundles and sends it to the headquarters of the Near East Relief, from where it is shipped to the Near East sufferers. Miss Lum said last night that she derives a great deal of pleasure out of her hobby, because she realizes that every penny or garment sent across the seas may save the life of some poor child. Miss Lum has often spoken in the interest of Near East Relief work in cities where her show travels.
Billboard, October 4, 1924
Chatter from Cleveland
Vail’s Black Cat Theater will not house stock burlesque for the present, but will be confined to road shows, musical comedy being given preference. Billy Vail left for New York on business, and Frankie Noonan is house manager of the Black Cat now. Frankie has been known to burlesque for many years. At one time he was the husband of Ada Lum, prima donna, billed as the Chinese-American prima donna. Frankie had charge of the Mutual Hotel for awhile last season.
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), October 5, 1924
Gayety
Barney Gerard’s new show comes ti the Gayety this week, starring thtwo comedians, Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan. Watson has been recruited from Keith’s vaudeville. He wrote a number of the scenes of this new show which tells of the adventures of Slitkin and Slotkin, real estate manipulators. The cast includes Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Elsa Lang, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson. The songs were written by Owen Murphy and Jay Gorney.
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), October 7, 1924
Gayety
An appreciative audience at the Gayety Theatre last night gave a hearty welcome to Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, the two Hebrew comedians who are reunited after several years. Watson and Cohan are starring in Barney Gerard’s new show, a well-balanced burlesque piece. Their antics as real estate promoters kept the house in an uproar. Besides Watson and Cohan there are in the cass [sic] Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Elsa Lang, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson. Barney Gerard, the producer of the show, is noted for his ability to pick pretty girls for his productions. A big feature of the show is its catchy music and melodious songs, which were written by Owen Murphy and Jay Gorney, composers of many Broadway successes.
Jewish Chronicle (Newark, New Jersey), October 31, 1924
Miner’s Empire
Barney Gerard presents next week, beginning with a matinee on Sunday, November 2, for the approval of the patrons of Miner’s Empire Theater, his latest contribution to burlesque, Barney Gerard’s New Show. Replete with good comedy, the show ranks with the best burlesque productions. Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan (here they are, together again) handle the comedy. These famous funmakers, who have appeared in recent years in several Slitkin and Slotkin roles, this season are real estate manipulators. Two years ago Watson deserted burlesque to appear at Keith vaudeville houses. With him back in burlesque, playing opposite his old partner, Cohan, theater-goers have a rare treat in store for them. These funmakers are heralded as the Weber and Fields of the present generation. As Slitkin and Slotkin, the two comedians are provided with a number of excruciatingly funny scenes, which were written by Mr. Watson. The two sell lots that prove to be worthless and get mixed up in many humorous situations.

The supporting cast includes Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson. A chorus of pretty dancing maids helps keep the show moving along at a rapid pace. Owen Murphy and Jay Gourney wrote the music for the show. Mr. Gerard personally supervised the staging of his production.

There will be a special midnight show Election evening, November 4, in conjunction with the above attraction. Full and complete returns will be read from the stage. The midnight show stars at 11:30 P. M., Tuesday night.
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), November 30, 1924


Waldron’s
Barney Gerard’s new show comes to Waldron’s this week. The two leading comedians of the cast are Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, who team as Slitkin and Slotkin, real estate operators, ad furnish most of the fun. They are supported by Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Elsa Lang, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Watson.

Besides the regular burlesque program there will be photo plays and vaudeville to complete the bill.
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), December 2, 1924
Waldron’s
Barney Gerard’s new show owned at Waldron’s last night. The two leading comedians of the cast are Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, who team as Slitkin and Slotkin, real estate operators, and furnish most of the fun. They are supported by Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Elsa Lang, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Mirphy and Rastus Wilson.

Beside the regular burlesque program there were photo plays and vaudeville to complete the bill.
Stamford Advocate (Connecticut), December 13, 1924
Stamford Theatre
Barney Gerard presents for the approval of the patrons of the Stamford Theatre Tuesday matinee and night his latest contribution to burlesque. Barney Gerard’s new show replete with good comedy, clever dialogue, catchy dialogue, catchy songs, tuneful music and a host of pretty girls, the show ranks with the best burlesque productions. Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan (here they are, together again), funmakers who have appeared in recent years in several Slitkin and Slotkin roles, this season are real estate manipulators. Two years ago Watson deserted burlesque to appear at Keith vaudeville houses. With him back in burlesque, playing opposite his old partner Cohan, theatergoers have a rare treat in store for them. These funmakers are heralded as the “Weber and Fields of the present generation.” As Slitkin and Slotkin, the two comedians are provided with a number of excruciatingly funny scenes, which were written by Mr. Watson. The two sell lots that prove to be worthless and get themselves mixed up in many humorous situations. The supporting cast includes Walter Johnson, Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson. A chorus of pretty dancing maids helps to keep the show moving along at a rapid pace. Owen Murphy and Jay Gourney wrote the music for the show. Mr. Gerard personally supervised the staging of his production.
Philadelphia Inquirer (Pennsylvania), January 4, 1925
Vaudeville Etc.
Casino—Something different is promised in Barney Gerard’s New Show, which will be here this week. There is no heavy plot, no tiresome dialogue, but a humorous narrative which holds the attention from the rise of the curtain. Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, the comedians, are engaged in the real estate business. Their lots prove worthless and there is no end of the difficulties they encounter on this score. They flee to Mexico, followed closely by a woman who demands that one of the partners keep his promise of marriage to her. They start a revolution and are lucky to escape with their lives. The second act finds them in Turkey. Assisting the comedians are Ada Lum, Olive DeClair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson. A chorus of high-steppers round out the clever company.


Evening Star (Washington, DC), January 11, 1925
Gayety—Barney Gerard.
Barney Gerard will present next week at the Gayety Theater his latest contribution to Columbia burlesque, replete with good comedy, clever dialogue, catchy songs, tuneful music and a host of pretty girls. Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, the feature comedians, are heralded as the “Weber and fields of Columbia Burlesque.”

The company includes Ada Lum, Olive de Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson, with a chorus of pretty dancing girls.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), January 14, 1925
Gayety—Barney Gerard’s Show.
Barney Gerard’s show is announced as the attraction at the Gayety Theater. It is said to be replete with good comedy, clever dialogue, catchy songs, tuneful music and a host of pretty girls. Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, featured comedians, appeared for years in “Slitkin and Slotkin” roles, but this season they are in the “real estate business.” These comics are called the “Weber and Fields of Burlesque.” The supporting cast includes Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball and Rastus Wilson, with a chorus of pretty dancing maids. Mr. Gerard has paid considerable attention to the scenery and stage settings.
Evening Star (Washington, DC), January 18, 1925
Gayety—Barney Gerard’s Show.
This week’s attraction at the Gayety Theater will be Barney Gerard’s New Show, starring Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, reunited after several years in what is said to be one of the funniest shows ever produced. Joseph K. Watson, left burlesque two years ago to appear in Keith vaudeville and was persuaded to return by Mr. Gerard, who realizes the value of the team Watson and Cohan to burlesque. They are heralded as the Weber and Fields of the present generation.

As Slitkin and Slotkln, real estate manipulators, the two comedians are provided with a number of very funny scenes, written by Joseph K. Watson.

The cast includes Ada Lum, Olive de Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson. The songs were written by Owen Murphy and Jay Gorney, composers of many Broadway successes. The chorus of 20 pretty girls is well trained In dancing and ensembles. Special attention is invited to the gowns and costumes worn by the feminine members of the company.
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), February 1, 1925
Barney Gerard’s New Burlesque Show at Grand
Barney Gerard’s New Show, starring the well=known comedians, Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, reunited after several years, is said to be one of the funniest shows ever produced. It will be at the Grand theater Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Joseph K. Watons, who deserted burlesque two years ago to appear in Keith vaudeville houses, established him as a headliner with a huge following, and it took considerable persuasion to induce him to return to burlesque. Watson and Cohan are heralded as the Weber and Fields of the present generation.

As Slitkin and Slotkin, reals estate manipulators, the two comedians are provided with a number of excruciatingly funny scenes, written by Joseph K. Watson.

As the result of domestic complications, Slitkin and Slotkin are compelled to flee the country and go to Mexico. Once there they become embroiled in an i[rising and are the leaders in an attempt to overthrow the Mexican government. They make a hasty departure from Mexico and land in Turkey, where they get into further difficulties.

It is these situation that provide opportunities for funmaking that Watson and Cohan take full advantage of. The entire production is up to the usual Barney Gerard standard and makes an admirable background to the efforts of the comedians and the long list of entertainers. The cost [sic] includes Ada Lum, Olive DeClair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson. The songs were written by Owen Murphy and Jay Gorney, composers of many Broadway successes. The chorus of 20 shapely girls is well trained in dancing and ensembles. The attention of the ladies is particularly called to the gowns and costumes worn by the feminine members of the company. All are designed by one of New York’s leading modistes, who recently returned from Paris. She has embodied the Parisian style in all of the costumes.—(Adv.)


The Repository (Canton, Ohio), February 3, 1925
Feature Comedians
The management of the Grand Opera House says there is a real treat in store for its patrons when Barney Gerard’s new show, featuring Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, will be the attraction. There two comedians who split up several years ago when Watson accepted a lucrative contract with Keith vaudeville, are together again. In the supporting cast are Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson.
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), February 4, 1925
Old Partners Together
Barney Gerard presents for the approval of the patrons of the Grand, opening Thursday his latest contribution to burlesque.

Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan handle the comedy as real estate manipulators.

Two years ago Watson deserted burlesque to appear at Keith vaudeville houses. With him back in burlesque, playing opposite his old partner, they are heralded as the “Weber and Fields of the present generation.”

The supporting cast includes Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson.
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), February 6, 1925
Clever Comedians Are Feature of Burlesque Show
Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, the featured comedians with Barney Gerard’s Columbia burlesque which is at the Grand Opera House the last half of this week, are about the best to appear on the circuit this season. They depend almost entirely upon clever quips and puns for their laughs, and they pack them in steadily.

Taking the roles of Slitkin and Slotkin, real estate partners, this pair finds many opportunities to dispense mirth. Cohan is a foil for Watkins [sic], and both take their part well. One of the cleverest discourses heard on the circuit this season is given by Watson. It deals with Biblical history and shows his ability.

The rest of the show is good, and makes a good entertainment combined with the comedians. The action is fast, especially in the second half of the show in which the best entertainment is produced

Gladys Darling, Ada Lum, Olive declare, Bob Manning and Casey Jones are the principal singers and they give a good musical program. The dancing is above the average, with Rastus Wilson, a colored chap, the star clogger. He is an acrobatic dancer, performing many difficult tricks. Diamond and Wallman also have several dancing numbers as do other members of the company. This production is above the average and performances will be repeated Friday and Saturday matinees and evenings.
Cleveland Gazette (Ohio), February 7, 1925
Barney Gerard’s Fine, New Show
Barney Gerard’s New Show, starring those two famous comedians, Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, reunited after several years, is said to be one of the funniest shows ever produced. Joseph K. Watson, who deserted burlesque two years ago to appear in Keith vaudeville houses, established himself as a headliner with a huge following, and it took considerable persuasion on one hand and a liberal display of currency by Mr. Gerard on the other hand to induce Mr. Watson to return to burlesque. Mr. Gerard realizes what a formidable team Watson and Cohan make for burlesque. They are heralded as the Weber and Fields of the present generation.

Barney Gerard’s new show is up to the usuals Barney Gerard standard with its exceptionally talented comedians and long list of other entertainers. The cast includes such favorites as Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, a picture of whom is given herewith; Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, Joseph Murphy and Rastus Wilson, well-known Afro-American entertainer. The songs were written by Owen Murphy and Jay Gorney, composers of many Broadway successes. The shores of 20 pretty, shapely girls is well trained in dancing and ensembles. The attention of the ladies is particularly called to the growns [sic] and costumes worn by the feminine members of the company. All were designed by one of New York’s leading modistes, who recently returned from Paris. She has embodied the Parisian style in all of the costumes.
The Repository (Canton, Ohio), February 7, 1925
Comedians Make Hit
Appreciative audiences at the Grand have given a hearty welcome to Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, Hebrew comedians who are reunited after several years. Watson and Cohan are starring in Barney Gerard’s burlesque.

Besides Watson and Cohan there are in the cast such favorites as Ada Lum, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, Manning and Ball, and Rastus Wilson.
Plain Dealer (Cleveland, Ohio), February 8, 1925


Columbia Wheel Has 25th Anniversary
In thirty-eight theaters on the Columbia circuit this week the burlesque wheel’s twenty-fifth anniversary is being celebrated. The week will be observed at the Columbia theater here by special features, including a midnight “professional” performance Thursday night. Players appearing in other theaters are invited and the special performance and extra features will be open to the public. Many of the major stars of all branches of the theater have come from Columbia burlesque—including Al Jolson, Will Rogers, Sophie Tucker, Nora Bayes, Clark and McCullough and Gallagher and Shean.

Ada Lum, shown in the picture, is featured this week in the Columbia’s attraction, “Barney Gerard’s New Show.”
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), February 21, 1925
News of the Stage
Ada Lum, Chinese-American prima donna of Barney Gerard’s New Show, which will appear at the New Lyceum theater next week, is well known to patrons of burlesque. She has a charming voice and personality.
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), February 22, 1925
New Lyceum.
With Watson and Cohan.
Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohen are the famous comedy stars heading Barney Gerard’s “New Show,” which opens at the New Lyceum today. Mr. Watson who deserted burlesque several years ago to appear in big time vaudeville established himself as such a popular headliner that it required considerable persuasion to induce him to return to his first love.

As Slitkin and Slotkin, real estate manipulators, the two comedians are provided with a number of funny scenes, written by Mr. Watson himself. Slitkin is pursued by a relentless female.

The cast includes Ada Lum, the Chinese-American star, whom Columbus will remember, Olive De Clair, Gladys Darling, Casey Jones, and Manning and Ball.
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), February 24, 1925
Ada Lum Is Featured.
Ada Lum is heading the feminine contingent with Joseph K. Watson and Will H. Cohan, who are appearing at the New Lyceum this week in Barney Gerard’s new show.
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), February 25, 1925
Plays and the Like.
… Is it because Ada Lum, Chinese-American singer, the lovely Ada, is on the bill? Anyway Barney Gerard’s show at the New Lyceum, works as backwards as anything Chinese, so that the beginning is really at the finale. It keeps the audience in the seats. Tomorrow night will be another “gift night.”
Evening Star (Washington, DC), June 1, 1925
Earle—Watson’s Musical Comedy Company.
A bright, little musical comedy, doubtless built on the Rogers Brothers’ “Mexico” of long ago, is the top liner at the Earle this week, leading a good variety bill, with an exceptional picture.

Joseph K. Watson and Abe Gore, Hebrew comedians, work with such telling effect as to keep the large audience continuously laughing. Their jokes are for the most part original and the old ones are given twists to make them seem almost new. The supporting company is large and capable. Ada Lum, Gladys Darling and Olive De Claire have the leading feminine parts, and are good looking, dance well and sing fairly well, although the first named has a voice above the average. …
Schenectady Gazette (New York) , January 5, 1926
Slitkin and Slotkin at Proctor’s Amuse Large Audiences
Something unusual and a tiny bit new in the two-a-day was offered at Proctor’s yesterday and the local patrons went home talking about it. Joseph K. Watson of Slitkin and Slotkin fame brought his aggregation to the local theater for a week’s stay. The first half of the week this company will present a lively bit of musical show and the last half something entirely different. …

Stitkin and Slotkin still live and love, according to this latest offering. Slitkin always in trouble and always giving poor Slotkin “oy, such a headache.” This time they have a real estate business that goes bad, very bad and they shie
away to Mexico and become generals in the army. Not such a hard job but material for laughs aplenty. …

This offering furnished many laughs for Watson and his partner have funny stuff to hand out. The little company had four women principals who danced just a bit and who sang several times. There was a dancing team of young men who were smooth and able. Then there was the straight man who helped the comics to register and who worked hard. …

There were 12 chorines in the act. They worked hard. The scenic artist did a good job on his canvas and as a result there were some pretty effects, especially the “Lady of the Sea” number.

In the cast were Abe Gore, Ada Lum, Olive De Claire, Mildred Markle, Dave Wallman, Jules Diamond, and Casey Jones. Ada Lum is another recruit from burlesque. The other names we could not recall as having been in the ranks of the embryonic musical comedy and operetta stars of tomorrow. Many have gone up from burlesque to that rank. …
Schenectady Gazette (New York), January 6, 1926
Proctor’s
Joseph K. Watson and his musical comedy company opened a week’s engagement at proctor’s Monday at the matinee, and they were greeted by a large and well pleased audience. The musical comedy, “The Real Estaters,” proved itself to be all that had been written of it, and was a delight to the eye as well as to the ear.

There are six scenes, all the scenery for which is carried by the presenting company, and these are especially pretty. The action throughout the comedy is characterized by pep, and the funny situations crowd thick and fast.

The presenting company is a high grade one, and the comedy which is in the nature of a revue, furnished specialties. The comedy work of Mr. Watson and Abe Gore, which is on the order of Potash and Perlmutter, is put over with a bang. The singing which was furnished by Olive DeClaire, Mildred Markle, Ada Lum, Elsa Grossman, Ebba Dahlstrom, Casey Jones and Jules Diamond, was much above the ordinary, and the principals were ably assisted by a good looking and sprightly chorus of 10. Messers, Diamond and Wallman do some very clever dancing, introducing many new and novel steps.

The feature picture for the first half of the wee is “California Straight Ahead” in which Reginald Denny has a powerful part: the automobile race which forms the climax is a wonderful piece of work.

As usual the performance will be continuous al this week from 1 to 11 o’clock, and all the regular features will be seen. Matinee prices prevail until 5:30 on all days of the week except Saturday, when the time limit will be 5 o’clock.
Schenectady Gazette (New York) , January 7, 1926


Schenectady Gazette (New York), January 8, 1926
Screen Production of “Thank You” Is Shown at Proctor’s
Joseph K. Watson and Abe Gore as Slitkin and Slotkin continued their antics at Proctor’s yesterday and presented a changed bill …

Mr. Watson and his company had for their part on the program “The Two Romeos.” In it Mr. Watson did some clever comedy work. The first scene was in the Golden Dragon cabaret, and “A Lesson in Love” was presented with Casey Jones as the announcer, Joseph K. Watson, the teacher; Abe Gore, the great lover, and Ada Lum, the loved one. In this skit Olive DeClare [sic] sings “The Great Divide.” Mildred Market sings “Oh How I Love That Man,”” and Ada Lum and the chorus are heard in “Save Your Sorrows.” …

“In Turkey” gives Watson and Gore an opportunity to return to their characters of Jake Slotkln and Abe Slitkin, and with Ada Lum and Olive DeClare as the sultan’s wives. …
Springfield Republican (Massachusetts), January 30, 1927


Springfield Republican (Massachusetts), January 31, 1927


Springfield Republican (Massachusetts), February 1, 1927


Springfield Republican (Massachusetts), February 2, 1927


Democrat and Chronicle (Rochester, New York), September 29, 1927
Keith’s Theater
… Ada Lum, a Chinese girl, and Gussie White, a character comedienne, will do an act of comedy and singing. …
Knickerbocker Press (Albany, New York), October 6, 1927


At the Theatres
Proctor’s Grand
Frank McGiynn, famed on the legitimate stage as star of John Drinkwater’s drama, “Abraham Lincoln,” will be the headliner of the week end bill of vaudeville at Proctor’s Grand, in a condensed version of this play. Other acts will be Herbert Faye and company, with Bert Morrisey, Bobbie Brown and Flo Donia, in “Laughology”; the Brown and De Mont Revue, “A La Dixie”; Ada Lum and Gussie White, Oriental and Occidental, in a comedy act with songs, and the Two Daveys, comedy jugglers. Monte Blue will be the film star in “The Bush Leaguer.”
Times-Union (Albany, New York), October 6, 1927


Times-Union (Albany, New York), October 7, 1927
Proctor’s
No man of the past hundred years has appealed as strong to the hearts of the American people as Abraham Lincoln. Honest Abe, the kindly woodsman-lawyer and President, ever holds an affectionate place in the hearts of his people. Now, in a one-act playlet, Frank McGlynn, the eminent actor, appears at proctor’s as “Abraham Lincoln” in a playlet founded on an actual incident in the life of the martyred leader. He gives a wonderfully fine character portrayal. Herbert Faye and company, the latter being Bert Morrisey, Bobbie Brown and Flo Donia, make up a quartette who offer songs and patter under the title of “Laughology.” The Browne and DeMont colored revue present “A la Dixie,” a clever jazz sketch. Kipling’s boast has been shattered by Ada Lum, Oriental, and Gussie White, Occidental, who present a comedy act with song trimmings. The two Daveys, novelty comedy jugglers, complete the bill. Pathe News, Topics of the Day and a comedy are screened. The added feature is Monte Blue in “The Bush Leaguer.”
Detroit Times (Michigan), December 18, 1927
Hollywood—Vaudeville and Films
“The Main Event,” story of the prize ring, with romance always on the upper track, will be featured on the screen at the Hollywood on the bill opening today and running four days. Vera Reynolds, Charles Delaney and Rudolph Schildkraut are among the featured players. This film sweeps the spectator on to humorous and dramatic heights seldom attained in a picture.

On the stage everything will run to the Spanish, with the title of the presentation being “Espanol.” The Sunnybrook Orchestra, led by Sammy Dibert, will offer Spanish specialties in syncopation, as will the Holllywood Ballet of eight dancing girls present Spanish steps and costumes.

The vaudeville acts include Johnny Mills and Tim Shea in a salt water comedy called “Two Happy Gobs.” “Jazz Lips” Richardson in “Daily Doings in Dixie” has some melody that brings a fresh voice and some rare humor. Another act is “Oriental Occidental” in which Ada Lum and Gussie White show their combined talents for staging comic oddities. The Hollywood Girls will appear in “Castanets” as their feature number.

Beginning Thursday with the change of program me, Rin-Tin-Tin, the dog star, will be seen on the screen in “A Dog of the Regiment.”
Seattle Daily Times (Washington), April 8, 1928
Pantages Bill to Be Headed by Big Jazz Band
… Ada Lum and Gussie White are two charming misses who appear in a comedy harmony offering which provides seductive melodies and satisfying smiles for the customers.

6—Ada Lum [right] and Gussie White [left]
coming to The Pantages tomorrow in vaudeville

Seattle Daily Times (Washington), April 9, 1928
Fun, Music Feature New Pantages Show
Six Acts of Vaudeville and Motion picture Are Offered on Week’s Bill
… Ada Lum and Gussie White have an act entitled “Oriental and Occidental” that rounds out an all-fun bill. …


San Francisco Chronicle (California), May 9, 1928
Denny Film Coming Next to Pantages
… Also at Pantages Saturday is a musical offering, the “Roun-De-Lay Revue” with a cast of singers and dancers. There is also Miss Catherine Judd, the blind musician sponsored by the United States Senator Thomas D. Schall.
Winchester and  Ross are comedians; Ada Lum and Gussie White are billed as “Oriental and Occidental;” Gloria De Von brings her trained animal troop to open the bill and the Five Cardinals offer acrobatics.
Billboard, June 23, 1928
Seen and Heard
Ada Lum and Gussie White, former featured feminines of burlesque, now doing a double act on the Pan. Times, are enjoying themselves between ate at West Seaside, Long Beach, Calif.
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), June 30, 1928
Most Popular Show in Weeks at World.
It rouses the most laughter and heartiest applause, the current show at the World theater, that has been there in a long while. “Roundelay Revue” is the headline attraction. …

One of the best scoring acts of the show is the comedy skit amusingly presented, with song embellishments, by Ada Lum and Gussie White. …
Omaha World-Herald (Nebraska), July 1, 1928


World—Vaudeville.
At the World theater this week …

Ada Lum and Gussie White are two misses of mirth and melody presenting an original act by Joseph K. Watson, “Oriental and Occidental.” …
Scranton Tribune (Pennsylvania), October 5, 1928
Something most impressive and unusual has been brought by Von Brona to the Capitol Theater for three days. It is a vaudeville dancing act along altogether original lines and entitled “Roe Factory.” It pleased great audiences at the three performances. …

Ada Lum and Gussie White were given a tumultuous greeting. Ada Lum is a performer with a great insularity of road shows on the speaking tattc. She has an assistant, Miss Gussie White. [?] had a talent for Oriental roles so there no surprise in finding Her presenting [illegible] There are three other fine features to a great performance.
Greensboro Daily News (North Carolina), November 4, 1928
Gilbert Film and Vaudeville Feature New Week at National
There’s plenty of variety at the National theater this week. …

Two novelty presentations will bring Roode and Francis “On Slack Wire,” and Ada Lum and Gussie White in “Oriental-Occidental.” …
Columbus Dispatch (Ohio), December 9, 1928
Palace.
Headlining today and the first half of the week at Keith-Albee Palace theater will be the great scenic comic, El Brendel and his pretty partner, Miss Flo Bert. …

Jack Trainer and company will present a comedy sketch called “Girl Wanted,” by Jack Lait. The original Honey Boys, Tommy Hyde, Irving Karo, Dan Marshall, Bill Cawley and [illegible] Talbot, will appear in “A Beehive Full of Honey.” Lillian St. [illegible] and company will show “How Circus Riders Are Made.” This is a true bit of circus life transplanted to the stage. Ada Lum and Gussie White will represent “Oriental and Occidental.” …


Milwaukee Journal (Wisconsin), February 10, 1929
Chinese Company Headlines Novel Bill at Riverside
Headlining the new bill at the Riverside are George Wong and company, China’s most versatile artists, three of them flappers. The group of artists are balancers, equilibrists, acrobats, jugglers and contortionists, whose feats are presented with showmanship.

Roy Rice and Mary Werner in “On the Scaffold” offer one of vaudeville’s comedy classics. They are American working in black face. They have just returned to this country after engagements in Britain. They went over for a few weeks but stayed for several years.

Gene Shuler and company will provide another bit of comedy, embellished with various other elements that make it a revue of distinction. Mr. Shuler is assisted by the Caron sisters, Wally Brown and Ole Odin. Gus Bartram and Vertner Saxton, “the Kentuckians,” are considered one of vaudeville’s best singing teams.

Ada Lum, an oriental, and Gussie White, an occidental, are an unusual two-girl combination. Frank ªPeg) Jones, “the old soldier comedian,” with his monologue, dancing and harmonica, and others will appear.
Binghamton Press (New York), April 12, 1929
Capitol.
A variety bill is being presented at the Capitol theatre. Preceding the vaudeville is the photoplay, “Honeymoon Flats.” The cast includes Bryant Washburn, Kathlyn Williams, Ward Crane, Bryant Washburn, George Lewis and Dorothy Gulliver. Margolla’s bird cabaret is a novelty act. Jay Velle, in a variety of songs, pleases. His methods, his manner, his personality and his material are perfect for vaudeville. “In a Bachelor’s Apartment” is a fun riot, and a musical farce. Ada Lum and Gussie White are seen and heard in “Oriental Occidental.” They present a comedy act with song trimmings. “The Ebony Scandals” is presented by a colored company. Steps, songs and comedy are presented.

“Ebony Scandals,” with Plenty of Fast Dancing, Features Capitol Bill
“Ebony Scandals,” a miniature “blackbird” offering, headlines the Keith vaudeville program which opened at the Capitol theatre yesterday. Each member of the company is a capable artist. The revue of steps, songs and comedy is amazing because of its speed.

Ada Lum and Gussie White score in their song version of “Oriental Occidental.” It is a comedy act with song trimmings. …
 

Daily Argus (Mount Vernon, New York), May 1, 1929


… Charles Willis, lyric tenor, will entertain in a number of songs on the vaudeville bill the last half of the week; Ada Lum and Gussie White in “Oriental,” “Occidental,” will offer entertainment, and Helen and Ralph Sternard, America’s premier xylophonists, will give a musical program.
Daily Argus (Mount Vernon, New York) , May 2, 1929
New Acts on Local Vaudeville
… Ada Lum, oriental, and Gussie White, occidental, shatter Kipling’s poem of “East Is East,” for these two artists work well together, the one a comedienne, the other a straight. Both sing, Miss Lum a Chinese number and Miss White a character selection. The third number is harmony singing.


Daily Argus (Mount Vernon, New York), May 3, 1929


… The vaudeville bill will include Ada Lum and Gussie White in songs and sketches; Helen and Ralph Sternard, xylophonists; Charles, Willis, lyric tenor; and Gates and company. In addition, there will be a Mack Sennett comedy, “The Bride’s Relations.”
 Daily Argus (Mount Vernon, New York), May 4, 1929


Yonkers Statesman (New York), June 28, 1929
‘Blackbird’ Revue Is Feature of Proctor’s New Stage Bill
A miniature counterpart of the Negro revues which have been finding favor of late on Broadway will be the feature act of the new vaudeville opening tomorrow at Proctor’s. Johnny Hudgins, who had a prominent part in “Blackbirds of 1928,” which was one of the first colored productions to win success, will present his, “Blackbird Jaszmanians.”

Proctor’s stage will wear the aspect of a Harlem cabaret during the engagement of the Hudgins act, for ot is a typical Negro entertainment, even to the settings. Aside from the fact that the cast includes entertainers who have won acclaim on Broadway’s stage after serving their apprenticeship in their native quarter in New York, Hudgins himself bears a reputation international in scope.

Another feature of the stage program will be the personal appearance of William Desmond, formerly bad man of the wild and wooly Western flickers, who has been back with his first love, the stage, for several years now. Desmond and a cast which he assembled from the New York legitimate stage will present a sketch in which he has a characteristic part as a ranch hero.

Emma Raymond and Company will present a sketch which they have named “A Surprise;” Ada Lum and Gussie White will offer “Oriental and Occidental,” and Phil and Eddie Ross will appear in a number entitled “Hitting Home Rung in the Field of Songland.”


Standard Union (Brooklyn, New York), July 27, 1929
Greenpoint—First Half: “Flapper Freshies” a Revue with I. J. Irving, Ada Lum, Gussie White and others. …
Boston Herald (Massachusetts), July 28, 1929
Scollay Square
“Protection,” now running as the feature film at the Scollay Square Theatre, is a newspaper melodrama combining thrilling action, comedy, romance, and a very obvious moral. … The stage show is headlined by Tommy “Bozo” Snyder, the man who never talks, appearing in person in a comedy playlet, “Boys Will Be Boys.” Other acts comprise Marga Reta, the singing violinist; the O’Connor twins, dancers; Ada Lum and Gussie White, in a comedy skit; Harris and Pepper, in another; and Miss Raffin and her trained monkeys in remarkable stunts.
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), August 7, 1929
State Offers Comedy Bill and Richard Dix in New Talkie Film
The State Theatre “Voice of Action” sound apparatus will present Richard Dix in “The Wheel of Life” as the talking moving picture at the popular Jersey City playhouse on the Boulevard, starting this afternoon and continuing to Saturday.

Heading the vaudeville part of the program will be Fred C. Hagan and Company in πThe Bearcat,” a comedy by the noted theatrical figure, Willard Mack. …

The Vaudeville Bill

… Further enhancing the bill will be Ada Lum and Gussie White in “Oriental-Occidental.” East and West certainly met when this pair united for vaudeville. Miss Lum is an oriental and Miss White is an occidental. They present a comedy act with song trimmings. Miss White is a character comedienne, Miss Lum does a straight. They both sing. Each has a solo and they end up with harmony singing. …
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), August 8, 1929
Row G., Two Seats on the Aisle
Comedy Vaudeville Bill Being Offered Along with Richard Dix in All-Talkie, “The Wheel of Life.”
… Ada Lum and Gussie White keep things moving at a rapid pace by their line of chatter, comedy antics and songs. It would be better if both girls stuck to the singing of blue songs for they certainly scored a hit in harmonizing “Make Me Happy.” …


Times-Advertiser (Trenton, New Jersey), August 25, 1929
… A new vaudeville bill will also be given at the Capitol Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. The acts will include Miss Gracie and her boy friends, Eddie Ready, Jimmy Conahan, Carl Nettie and Lou Carroll in “Tunes, Toes and Taps.” Ada Lum and Gracie White are to have a bright skit as “Oriental” and “Occidental.” A laughmaker is also to be offered in “The Sheriff” by Jack ‘Rube’ Clifford and Mary Ludwig.
Jersey Journal (Jersey City, New Jersey), November 16, 1929
Broadway Flashes at the Central
Top Interesting Vaude Bill Which Opens Four-Day Engagement Today.
“Broadway Flashes,” a review of the world’s playground featuring Phil Seed and Katherine McConnell, Mason sisters, Jack Karney, Peggy Harvey and Elaine Seidler, top the vaudeville program which opens at the Central Theatre today.

Another feature on the same vaudeville program will be Burnett and Wheeler, Broadway’s musical comedy favorites, in a unique offering. Ray Shannon and Company, present a little musical comedy depicting life back stage in a small vaudeville theatre entitled “Oh Props.” Another set on this attractive program will be Miss Ada Lum and Gussie White. Miss Lum is an Oriental and Miss White an Occidental. They present a comedy act with song trimmings. Davids and Glass have an unusual offering calling “Saying It By Wire.”

The screen attraction is the all talking, singing and dancing picture drama, “Broadway,” reference of which is made elsewhere in these columns.

 Gallery of entertainers who shared the stage or bill with Ada.



























Gladys Darling



Further Reading
Burlesque


(Next post on Friday: Year of the Ox)

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