Friday, December 14, 2018

Media Spotlight: Peg O’Wing, Actress






















Library of Congress
Peg O’Wing  (above)
July 15, 1915, Bain News Service 
(Pennsylvania)
July 17, 1915
Perfect American Man Wanted—by Peg O’Wing
She’s Chinese, But He Must Be Well Nigh Ideal to Qualify.

New York, July 17.—Wanted—a perfect American man! Applicants may apply at the studio at 124 west Twenty-third street where sitting cross-legged on a silken prayer rug waits pretty Peg O’Wing, a Chinese miss of 17 years. Peg O’Wing, whose real name is Mai Wing, looks more like Eva Tanguay in her prime than a doll-like Chinese, according to her admirers.

“I want a perfect American man,” lisped Peg today. “He must be temperamental, but he must not boss me, nor swear, nor drink, nor smoke, and he may squeeze my hands only at proper intervals. He must be perfect and above all an American.”

The Saratogian
(Saratoga Springs, New York)
July 17, 1915
Wanted: A Perfect Man
She’s Chinese, But He Must Be Well Nigh Ideal to Qualify.
New York, July 17.—Wanted—a perfect American man! Applicants may apply at the studio at 124 west Twenty-third street where sitting cross-legged on a silken prayer rug waits pretty Peg O’Wing, a Chinese miss of seventeen years. Peg O’Wing, whose real name is Mai Wing, looks more like Eva Tanguay in her prime than a doll-like Chinese, according to her admirers.

“I want a perfect American man,” lisped Peg today. “He must be temperamental, but he must not boss me or swear, not drink nor smoke, and he may squeeze my hands only at proper intervals. He must be perfect and above all an American.”

New York Call
July 18, 1915
Pretty Chinese Maiden Waits for Perfect American Man
Wanted, a perfect American man. Applicants may apply at the studio at 124 West 23d street where sitting cross-legged on a silken prayer rug waits pretty Peg O’Wing, a Chinese miss of 17 years. Peg O’Wing, whose real name is Mai Wing, looks more like Eva Tanguay in her prime than a doll-like Chinese, according to her admirers.

“I want a perfect American man,” lisped Peg today. “He must be temperamental, but he must not boss me, nor swear, nor drink, nor smoke, and he may squeeze my hands only at proper intervals. He must be perfect—and above all, an American.”

Alexandria Times-Tribune
(Indiana)
July 19, 1915
Wanted! A Perfect American Man by Pretty Peg O’Wing
(By United Press)

New York, July 17.—Wanted: A perfect American man! Applicants may apply at the studio at 124 West Twenty-Third street where sitting cross-legged on a silken prayer rug waits pretty Peg O’Wing, a Chinese miss of 17 years. Peg O’Wing, whose real name is Mai Wing, looks more like Eva Tanguay in her prime than a doll-like Chinese, according to her admirers.

“I want a perfect American man,” lisped Peg today. “He must be temperamental, but he must not boss me, nor swear, nor drink, nor smoke, and he may squeeze my hands only at proper intervals. He must be perfect and above all, an American.”























Springfield Union
(Massachusetts)
July 19, 1915

Would Be Chinese Bernhardt
Peg O’Wing, native of Pekin, China, aspires to be known as the Chinese Sarah Bernhardt. She is a modest Chinese girl, speaks English without an accent, dances and sings charmingly and is a striking type of Chinese beauty. She was discovered in Chinatown, N. Y., where her name is Mai Wing, by Mrs. Jean White, who is the only white woman in New York who speaks Chinese.

Peg O’Wing says she has refused to marry sic young Chinese men her father picked out for her and thinks she will marry an American when she does marry. 


(In the above caption Peg O’Wing is described as “a modest Chinese girl”. The following newspaper said she is “a modern Chinese girl”.)






















Duluth Herald
(Minnesota)
July 20, 1915
Chinese Beauty Would Wed American
Peg O’Wing, native of Pekin, China, aspires to be known as the Chinese Sarah Bernhardt. She is a modern Chinese girl, speaks English without an accent, dances and sings charmingly and is a striking type of Chinese beauty. She was discovered in Chinatown, New York, where her name is Mai Wing, by Mrs. Jean White, who is the only white woman in New York who speaks Chinese. Peg O’Wing says she has refused to marry sic young Chinese men her father picked out for her and thinks she will marry an American when she does marry. 






















Kansas City Star
(Missouri)
July 23, 1915
Want a Chinese Bride?
Pretty Peg O’Wing Is Seeking an American for a Husband.
The Oriental Has His Good Points, But This Fair Young Maid Doesn’t Like His Attitude Toward Women.

From the New York Evening World.

Pretty Peg O’Wing, wistful Chinese miss of seventeen summers, has ransacked Manhattan and a part of New Jersey for a husband, and she can’t find one to suit her. She has passed up a dozen young Chinese suitors and half a dozen American men. With ruthless cruelty she turned them all down.

A Chinese husband for Peg? Well, not if she can help it. She doesn’t want much. Oh, no! She wants an American beau. He may be a hyphenated American, but he must be a suitor par excellence—more perfect than the most perfect husband any of Peg’s American sisters hope for.

Reg, whose real Chinese name is Mai Wing, is called Maudie by her papa. The Gaelic “O” in her Americanized name stands for the “Oh!” that everybody exclaims on first catching sight of the winsome Peg.

Peg Is a Suffragette.

A reporter who wished to do all he could to aid Peg in her search (but who threw up the job when he learned the requirements she imposed) found the slant eyed maid in Mrs. Jean White’s studio, 124 West Twenty-third Street.

He found a modern young Chinese woman dressed in pink satin dancing sippers and a beautiful brocaded blue silk mandarin coat. Her jet black hair was as fluffy as Eva Tanguay’s, so different from the sleek and shining hair dress of her country women.

Peg planted herself on a divan, sat there tailor fashion and recounted her experiences with the poor young fellows who hoped to, but couldn’t win her hand.

“I won’t marry a Chinese,” she said. “I am a modern Chinese girl, and, mind you, a suffragette. (She didn’t exactly say suffragette. Her pronunciation was more musical—‘suf-frey-set-tee’). Chinese men all treat women as if they were toys. I’m no toy. Chinese men are nice, but I don’t like their attitude toward women.”

Each Suitor Had Some Fault.

She told about an impulsive young Italian-American suitor who was all right until, in pressing his proposal, he told her he would kill her if she didn’t marry him. That was his cue for an exit.

“Now, just to show you how he did not keep his promise,” said the coy Peg, “I’m still alive. I don’t like men who don’t keep their promises.”

There was a gay young Frenchman. He was too explosive, too dandified and too shallow, she explained, and after he wore out the knees of his breeches proposing she dropped the curtain on him and zip!—he was shut out.

And then there was a young German-American, attentive, polite and reserved. Everything went well with Peg and him for a long time. But he had big fat hands. Also he had some strength. In his excitement during his last proposal (he had many) he squeezed poor little Peg’s tiny hand so hard that it hurt. He squeezed himself out of her heart immediately.

Here Are the Requirements.

A sad eyed young American was the last one to propose. He was too sad eyed, and one night he cried in proposing to her, and his tears washed away all of Peg’s admiration for him.

“And now,” Peg concluded, “I want a man who won’t boss me, who is temperamental, who doesn’t swear, smoke or drink, who wouldn’t object to his wife riding a horse bareback down Broadway. He may squeeze my hand, but only at the proper moment. He mustn’t fuss around the kitchen, but he must know the difference between a ham and a porterhouse steak. He must be absolutely perfect—and an American.”

“And you haven’t found him yet?’ asked the reporter.

“No,” said Peg.






















Rocky Mountain News
(Colorado)
July 23, 1915
Chinese Maid Wants a ‘Man’
Pretty Peg O’Wing Says He Must Be Perfect and an American.
New York, July 22.—Pretty Peg O’Wing, wistful Chinese miss of seventeen summers, has ransacked Manhattan and a part of New Jersey for a husband, and she can’t find one to suit her. She has passed up a dozen young Chinese suitors and half a dozen American men. With ruthless cruelty she turned them all down.

A Chinese husband for Peg? Well, not if she can help it. She doesn’t want much. Oh, no! She wants an American beau. He may be a hyphenated American, but he must be a suitor par excellence—more perfect than the most perfect husband any of Peg’s American sisters hope for.

Peg, whose real Chinese name is Mai Wing, is called Maudie by her papa. The Gaelic “O” in her Americanized name stands for the “Oh!” that everybody exclaims on first catching sight of the winsome Peg.

The reporter who wanted to do all he could to aid Peg in her search (but who threw up the job when he learned the requirements she imposed) located the slant-eyed maid in Mrs. Jean White’s studio, No. 124 West Twenty-third street, today.

He found a very modern young Chinese lady indeed, dressed in pink satin dancing sippers and a beautiful brocaded blue silk mandarin coat. Her jet black hair was as fluffy as Eva Tanguay’s—so different from the sleek and shining hairdress of her countrywomen.

Peg planted herself on a divan, sat there tailor fashion and recounted her experiences with the poor young fellows who hoped to, but couldn’t, win her hand.

“I won’t marry a Chinese,” she said. “I am a modern Chinese girl, and, mind you, a suffragette. (She didn’t exactly say suffragette. Her pronunciation was more musical—‘Suffrey-set-tee’). Chinese men all treat women as if they were toys. I’m no toy.”

West Virginian
(Fairmont, West Virginia)
July 23, 1915
What’s in a Name? Peg Is Chinese, Not Irish
Peggy O’Wing
Miss Peg O’Wing who is from China not from Ireland has come to America to make her debut on the stage. It’s Peg’s ambition to become the “Bernhardt of China.”

The Day Book
(Chicago, Illinois)
July 24, 1915
What’s in a Name? Peg Is Chinese, Not Irish
Peggy O’Wing
Miss Peg O’Wing, who is from China not from Ireland, has come to America to make her debut on the stage. It’s Peg’s ambition to become the “Bernhardt of China.”

Rock Island Argus
(Illinois)
July 24, 1915
Chinese, Wants American Husband
New York, July 24.—For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor for that matter have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans are often puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing—Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname.

Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the Oriental ways which she has not forsaken, add charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to her manner of Chinese reckoning, 18 years old, but only 17 according to the American method. Now 18, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the score have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.”

Peg O’Wing has other aspirations beside obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women.

Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success they think she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English.

The Fort Wayne News
(Indiana)
July 30, 1915
Chinese, Wants American Husband
New York, July 30.—For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor for that matter have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans are often puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing—Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname.

Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, add charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to her manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the score have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.”

Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women.

Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success they think she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as [English].

The Madison Journal
(Tallulah, LA)
August 7, 1915
Seeks Fame on the Stage
Chinese Girl Aspires to Be the Sarah Bernhardt of the Oriental Race
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans are often puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing—Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, added charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to her manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the scores have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women. Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English, and she feels that an American of her ideal type will appreciate her more as a wife, than a Chinaman.






















Buffalo Courier
(New York)
August 8, 1915
Chinese girl who aspires to be Bernhardt of her race, seeks American husband.
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans seem to be puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing—Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the Oriental ways which she had not forsaken, add charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to the manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen, according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the score have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations beside securing an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women.

Perth Amboy Evening News
(New Jersey)
August 9, 1915
Seeks Fame on the Stage
Chinese Girl Aspires to Be the Sarah Bernhardt of the Oriental Race
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans seem to be puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing, Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, added charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to the manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the scores have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women. Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English, and she feels that an American of her ideal type will appreciate her more as a wife, than a Chinaman.

Celina Democrat
(Ohio)
August 13, 1915
Seeks Fame on the Stage
Chinese Girl Aspires to Be the Sarah Bernhardt of the Oriental Race
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans seem to be puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing, Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, added charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to the manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the scores have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women. Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English, and she feels that an American of her ideal type will appreciate her more as a wife, than a Chinaman.

Dresden Enterprise and Sharon Tribune
(Tennessee)
August 20, 1915
Seeks Fame on the Stage
Chinese Girl Aspires to Be the Sarah Bernhardt of the Oriental Race
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans seem to be puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing, Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, added charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to the manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the scores have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women. Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English, and she feels that an American of her ideal type will appreciate her more as a wife, than a Chinaman.

The Republican Journal
(Belfast, Maine)
September 2, 1915
Seeks Fame on the Stage
Chinese Girl Aspires to Be the Sarah Bernhardt of the Oriental Race
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans seem to be puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing, Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, added charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to the manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the scores have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women. Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English, and she feels that an American of her ideal type will appreciate her more as a wife, than a Chinaman.






















Illustrated World
October 1915
A Style from the Chinese
“Trousers for women!” The idea brings up thoughts of the pampered and imprisoned beauties of the Oriental harem, and of the bizarre attempts of Occidental women to be different; but when worn by those who are accustomed to them, trousers acquire a beauty and charm that does not at all accord with the popular ideas. Occidental styles offer nothing more simple and graceful than the trousers worn by Miss Peg O’Wing, the talented young Chinese actress, as shown the photograph reproduced on this page. 

American adaptations, as exemplified in the picture to the left, in all probability, are responsible for the masculine smiles which greet the adoption of the idea by our women. Perhaps the comparison may not be just; but somehow it does seem to the untutored masculine mind that the style has lost in grace, utility, and charm by transplantation into alien fashions.

Bridgeport Chronicle-Union
(California)
December 4, 1915
Seeks Fame on the Stage
Chinese Girl Aspires to Be the Sarah Bernhardt of the Oriental Race
For all of her Irish name, Peggy O’Wing has never seen Ireland, nor, for that matter, have her father and mother had any Irish ancestry. Peg is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wing Bock of Newark, N. J. Of course, one wonders why, if her father’s name is Bock, she is called O’Wing. The Chinese do things which we Americans seem to be puzzled over. It is because her father and mother are Chinese that her name is O’Wing. That signifies daughter of Wing, Wing being Mr. Bock’s surname. Though she is thoroughly Americanized, some of the oriental ways which she has not forsaken, added charm to the fair Celestial maiden who is seeking a husband. Peg is, according to the manner of Chinese reckoning, eighteen years old, but only seventeen according to the American method. Now eighteen, in China, is considered an old age for an unmarried girl, and her father has endeavored in every possible way to aid Dan Cupid. Chinamen by the scores have come to the Bock home and have been captivated by the charm of the fair maid, but she would have none of them, because she has made up her mind to have none but an American husband. Her charming features resemble those of a Spanish beauty, and that is saying something, for when a Spanish girl is a beauty she is “some pippin.” Peg O’Wing has other aspirations besides obtaining an American husband, for she aspires to be the Sarah Bernhardt of her own race. It was against the wishes of her father, who is a prominent merchant, that she studied for the stage, for in China the parent of a girl frowns on any attempt of his child disporting herself for the admiration of the crowd. Consequently a stage life for the Chinese woman is never encouraged. So rare is the Chinese actress in China that men often play the roles of women. Miss O’Wing will be the only Chinese actress in the United States. Her three sisters are praying that she will meet with the success she deserves on her initial appearance in New York. She speaks Italian, Chinese, German and French as well as English, and she feels that an American of her ideal type will appreciate her more as a wife, than a Chinaman.

Friday, December 7, 2018

Hon Chew Hee, Artist

Hon Chew Hee was born on January 24, 1906, in Kahului, Maui, Hawaii.

1910 United States Federal Census
Name / Age
Jackson Hee, 40 (born in China; private school teacher)
Lee See Hee, 37 (born in China)
Chong Hee, 11
Ngu Hee, 09
Lung Hee, 7
Ku Heem 5
Chaw Hee, 4 (spelling in census)
Bew Hee, 1

Wai J. Char, Tin-Uke Char
Hawaii Chinese History Center, 1988
page 120
…Jackson School was then located on the ewa side of what is today the Smith Street parking lot in Chinatown. Its principal was Jackson HEE, a disciplinarian and academic classicist. HEE had taught Chinese in Lahaina, Hanapepe, and Honolulu, and was editor of the Hilo Sun Wan Daily News, Honolulu’s Hawaiian Chinese News, and New China Press. He retired to China in 1922 at age sixty-one after thirty years in Hawaii. His son is the internationally known artist Hon Chew HEE.
Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger List
Name: Chew Hee
Age: 15 [sic]
Ship: Siberia Maru
Port of Departure: Hong Kong, December 31, 1920
Port of Arrival: Honolulu, Hawaii, January 23, 1921

Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger List
Name: Chew Hee
Age: 22
Ship: Siberia President Madison
Port of Departure: Hong Kong, August 14, 1928
Port of Arrival: Honolulu, Hawaii, August 30, 1928

California, Passenger List
Name: Hon Chew Hee
Age: 23
Ship: President Jefferson
Port of Departure: Honolulu, Hawaii, August 15, 1929
Port of Arrival: San Francisco, California, August 21, 1929

1930 United States Federal Census
902 Clay Street, San Francisco, California
Name / Age
Hon Chew Hee, 24 (head of the household had no occupation)
Hung T. Leong, 32 (lodger was a newspaper printer)

Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger List
Name: Chew Hee
Age: 26
Ship: President Jackson
Port of Departure: San Francisco, California, July 1, 1932
Port of Arrival: Honolulu, Hawaii, July 7, 1932

Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger List
Name: Chew Hee
Age: 26
Ship: President McKinley
Port of Departure: Honolulu, Hawaii, July 21, 1932
Port of Arrival: Hongkong, August 8, 1932

Daily Worker
(New York, New York)
June 26, 1937
Art Patrons Exhibition [the second annual National Exhibition of American Art]
…In such a large show there naturally would be a fair amount of good pictures and sculpture. From the Hawaiian Islands Hon Chew Hee sends a colorful canvas of Waimea Canyon and Madge Tennent a violently flickering “The New Holoku.”…
The New York Times
June 20, 1937
The Municipal Art Committee Assembles Work From Every Part of the Union
A way out in the Hawaiian Islands Hon Chew Hee has painted the unholy splendor of color in Waimea Canyon….
1940 United States Federal Census
1011 Pawaa Lane (rear), Honolulu, Hawaii
Name / Age
Sam W Young, 31 (head of the household)
Bertha C Young, 29
Mary Ann Young, 8
Vernon Young, 5
Donna Young, 3
Chock Ying Young, 19
Yen Sau Young, 17
How Chew Hee, 32 (lodger, art teacher)

New York Sun
February 24, 1940










(New York)
March 3, 1940
New Gallery
As its premier exhibition, the Schoenemann Galleries have selected a group of 43 watercolors and drawings by Hon Chew Hee, who was born in Honolulu of Chinese parents.

Single figure studies dominate the show. “Sleeping Chinese Boy" is easily the outstanding paper here. In most of his subjects, Hon Chew Hee concerns himself chiefly with the silhouette outline characteristics of his sitters, indicating the merest suggestions of form beyond the two dimensional aspect. He is a promising young artist, with keen observing faculties and cleverness of hand. 

As a member of the Hawaiian Mural Guild, Mr. Hee does himself an injustice by omitting group compositions from this exhibit.
The New York Times
March 3, 1940
A Reviewer’s Notebook
Very indirect and dilute is the oriental influence in the water-color drawings by Hon Chew Hee, a Hawaiian-born Chinese, whose work may be seen at the Schoenemann Gallery, 605 Madison Avenue. Most of his subjects are in the figure field and they are distinguished by cleverness and fluency of line. One seated nude suggests a Daibutsu; another curiously resembles a Rodin wash-drawing. It is light and charming depiction, most of it quite personal.
World War II Draft Card
Name: Hon Chew Thomas Hee
Age: 34
Birth Place: Kahului
Birth Date: January 24, 1906
Residence Place: Honolulu, Hawaii
Registration Date: October 26, 1940
Employer: Ko Fong Lum
Weight: 120
Complexion: Light Brown
Eye Color: Brown
Hair Color: Black
Height: 5 4
Next of Kin: Ko Fong Lum

(China)
October 12, 1945
Marjorie Wong Is Bride of H.C. Hee, Honolulu Artist






























Kingston Daily Freeman
(New York)
July 11, 1949
Woodstock News
Art Exhibition Is Opened at Gallery; Will End July 20
Woodstock, July 11— One hundred and 31 painters and eight sculptors are represented in the art show which opened Friday afternoon at the Woodstock Art Gallery. Sponsored by the Woodstock Artists Association, the exhibition is said to be the most comprehensive show of the season.

Paintings by prominent artists are hung with those of students and artists who are not so well known. The unusual variety of the work on view tends toward a most interesting exhibition. It is a non-jury show and required only, that the work meet size limitation, under 30 inches including frame. The show will continue until July 20 and will be open to the public weekdays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

The exhibition includes…Farmer's Blessing, Hon Chew Hee…
Honolulu, Hawaii, Passenger List
Name: Chew Hee
Age: 43
Address: 1039 Wong Lane, Honolulu, Hawaii
Ship: Ile de France
Port of Departure: New York, New York, September 7, 1949
Port of Arrival: Le Havre, France

The Chinese in Hawaii: A Historical Sketch
Robert M. Lee
Advertiser Publishing Company, 1961
The Group, which later became affiliated with the Chinese Art Club of San Francisco, had headquarters in the studio which John C. Young, the first president, and Hon-Chew Hee, the first treasurer. It was above M’s Tavern at Fort and Merchants Sts.

August 22, 1993
Air Terminal for Hawaii
A new Interisland Terminal has opened at Honolulu International Airport on the island of Oahu in Hawaii….

The Interisland Terminal is planted with flora native to Hawaii, including lauae fern, mondo grass and palm trees. Two 180-foot-long murals depicting Hawaiian legends and cultural scenes, painted by the late Hon Chew Hee, hang in the main lobby….

Further Reading and Viewing
WikiVisually (scroll to bottom)


(Next post on Friday: Peg O’Wing, Actress)

Friday, November 30, 2018

Media Spotlight: Anna Low, Aviatrix

Daily Advocate
(Stamford, Connectocut)
November 20, 1919





















Schenectady Gazette
(New York)
November 21, 1919





















The Patriot
(Harrisburg, Pennsylvania)
November 21, 1919





















Daily Argus
(Mount Vernon, New York)
November 22, 1919





















Morning Herald
(Gloversville, New York)
November 28, 1919





















Decatur Herald
(Illinois)
November 30, 1919
Mrs. Anna Low, wife of George Low, municipal engineer of the Island of Maul. Hawaii, and a graduate of the University of California, has the distinction of being, the first Chinese woman aviator. This photograph was taken, on her return to San Francisco from her home in China, where she was taught to fly by the famous Chinese aviator Tom Gunn, her brother-in-law.

Petaluma Argus-Courier
(California)
December 1, 1919
p4: First Chinese Woman to Become an Aviator
Mrs. George Low
Mrs. Anna Low, wife of George Low, municipal engineer of the Island of Maui, Hawaii, and a graduate of the University of California, has the distinction of being the first Chinese woman aviator. This photograph was taken on her return to San Francisco from her home in China, where she was taught to fly by the famous Chinese aviator Tom Gunn, her-brother-in-law.

Evening State Journal and Lincoln Daily News
(Lincoln, Nebraska)
December 4, 1919





















Baltimore American
(Maryland)
December 28, 1919












The Green Book Magazine
May 1920






















Women of China
Foreign Language Press, 1990
page 40: Women Pioneers in Aviation

This is the first in a series of articles about the women who pioneered in China aviation

Although their numbers were not large, these strong women dedicated their energy and skill to the motherland as well as to the cause of aviation. Their noble spirit stimulated the ideals of millions of Chinese women. The heroic women fought against traditional feudal ideas to move China forward.

Women in the United States and Europe became interested in aviation before Chinese women, but Chinese women were the first in Asia to take their place in an airplane cockpit. Actually, in 1915 [sic], shortly after the outbreak of World War I, Mrs. Anna P. Low, an American-Chinese became the very first woman aviator. Her brother-in-law was the well known aviator, Tom Gun. Inspired by his example, she took flying lessons in the United States. Tom Gun went to China to fight under Dr. Sun Yat-sen, but Anna was still undergoing flight training. When she completed her training she also went to China and American newspapers hailed her as “the first Chinese woman pilot.”

* * * * *

At Ancestry.com there are two passenger lists with an “Anna Low” and “Anna T. Low” who sailed from Honolulu to San Francisco in 1919 and 1925. The 1919 passenger list (below) said she was born January 31, 1895 in San Francisco. A third passenger list recorded “Anna Low” traveling from Victoria, British Columbia to Seattle, Washington. Her identification was Form 430, a requirement of the Chinese Exclusion Act. She was five feet tall and an Oakland, California resident at 254 8th Street. I believe the woman in the passenger lists was the aviatrix, Anna Low.













(Next post on Friday: Hon Chew Hee, Artist)

Tuesday, November 27, 2018

Bruce Lee’s Birthday and Case File

Chinese Exclusion Act Case Files

National Archives Catalog
Return Certificate Application Case File of 
Chinese Departing —Bruce Lee (12017/53752)


(Next post on Friday: Anna Low, Aviatrix)

Friday, November 16, 2018

Dong Kingman at Mills College

Shanghai Evening Post and Mercury
(China)
February 25, 1944














Further Reading
Mills College

Archives of American Art
Oral history interview with Dong Kingman, 1996 Jul. 3-4

The Summer Sessions 1933–1952
Visiting Artists at the Mills College Art Museum
Dong Kingman in timeline


(Next post on Tuesday: Bruce Lee’s Birthday and Case File)




Friday, November 9, 2018

Yun Gee in the Shanghai Evening Post and Mercury

April 16, 1943
Chinese Painter Works in New York

































October 8, 1943
As a Chinese Artist Sees New York

















October 20, 1944
Yun Gee Oil Shown at Metropolitan





















April 6, 1945
New York Bridge as Seen by Chinese Artist

















September 13, 1946
Yun Gee Exhibition Scheduled in SF












(Next post on Friday: Dong Kingman at Mills College)